School Choice

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Entry
  • Reader's Guide
  • Entries A-Z
  • Subject Index

  • Prior to the 1990s, most government-funded school systems in the developed countries operated on a model giving parents limited choice over where their children should attend. The most common arrangement was for government officials to allocate children to schools on the basis of their place of residence. Many systems allowed for some limited choice within that model; for example, the English system included schools run by religious organizations, and single-sex schools, into which parents could opt. Most systems allowed for choice beyond the government system: Private schools have always been an option in most countries for those willing and able to pay for them.

    As early as 1955, the economist Milton Friedman proposed a radical alternative, removing the government entirely from allocation decisions. The underlying principle ...

    Looks like you are not subscribed to have access to full content on this book.

    Please login or subscribe to get access.

    If your Institution does not have a subscription and you cannot access the full text of content on the site, find out how your Institution can subscribe.

    • Aims of Education
    • Classic Premodern Philosophers, Theories, and Theorists
    • Curriculum
    • Educational Research, Evaluation, and Testing
    • Equity, Rights, Social Stratification, and Citizenship
    • Higher Education
    • Learners, Learning, and Teaching
    • Liberal Education
    • Moral, Religious, Spiritual, and Social/Cultural Values
    • Multiculturalism and Special Populations
    • Organization of Schooling
    • Philosophy of Education: The Analytic Tradition
    • Philosophy of Education: The Continental Traditions
    • Philosophy of Education: Feminist Perspectives
    • Philosophy of Education: Nonwestern Traditions
    • Philosophy of Education: The Political Theory Tradition
    • Philosophy of Education: The Pragmatic Tradition
    • Philosophy of Science, Sociology of Science, and Epistemology
    • Progressive Education
    • Psychological Orientation in Educational Theory
    • Social Sciences Orientation in Educational Theory
    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • I
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • P
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • T
    • U
    • V
    • W
    • X
    • Y
    • Z


      • Loading...
    Back to Top