Encyclopedia of African American Education

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Edited by: Kofi Lomotey

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    • Editorial Board

      Editor

      Kofi Lomotey, Southern University and A&M College

      Editorial Board

      Melody L. Carter, Fort Valley State University, Georgia

      Adrienne Dixson, The Ohio State University

      William A. Smith, University of Utah

      Joy Williamson-Lott, University of Washington

      Jerome E. Morris, The University of Georgia

      Copyright

      View Copyright Page

      List of Entries

      Reader's Guide

      The Reader's Guide is provided to help readers find entries on related topics. It classifies entries into 16 categories: Alternative Educational Models; Associations and Organizations; Biographies; Collegiate Education; Curriculum; Economics; Gender; Graduate and Professional Education; Historically Black Colleges and Universities; Legal Cases; Precollegiate Education; Psychology and Human Development; Publications; Public Policy; Religious Institutions and Schooling; and Segregation/Desegregation. Some entries appear in more than one category.

      About the Editor

      Kofi Lomotey is the chancellor and professor of education at Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. His passion for excellence in education and inclusion was shaped largely by his undergraduate experience at Oberlin College in Ohio. A first-generation college student, Lomotey was inspired by Oberlin College and a diverse student body that was prepared to compete and motivated to achieve. With the help of fellow students, Kofi founded a preschool/early elementary school for African American children in the city of Oberlin. He is a published national expert in the fields of urban education, character building in early learners, and educational leadership that nurtures equal opportunity and inclusion.

      Lomotey has served as executive vice president and provost at Fisk University, president of Fort Valley State University, senior vice president and provost at Medgar Evers College (CUNY), and as a member of the education faculties at Louisiana State University and the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the editor of the journal, Urban Education, published by Corwin Press. He holds a PhD from Stanford University in educational administration and policy analysis, a master's from Stanford in the same area, an MEd from Cleveland State University in curriculum and instruction, and a bachelor's degree from Oberlin College in economics.

      Lomotey has published several books, articles in professional journals, and book chapters. His research interests include urban schools, students of African descent in higher education, principals of African descent in elementary schools, and independent African-centered schools. He is an active member of the American Education Research Association (AERA), the largest professional organization of professors and students of education. He served as principal investigator on several grants totaling more than $4 million.

      Among the awards Lomotey has received are the Outstanding Scholar Award and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Educational Research Association and the President's Award for Research from Phi Delta Kappa. He serves on the board of trustees for Oberlin College and Xechem International of New Brunswick, New Jersey.

      Lomotey is married to A. Nahuja. They are the parents of three and grandparents of one.

      Contributors

      Sessi S. F. Aboh, Fisk University

      Delores P. Aldridge, Emory University

      Marcus Anthony Allen, Morgan State University

      Walter R. Allen, University of California, Los Angeles

      Molefi Kete Asante, Temple University

      Diana E. Axelsen, Sage Publications, Inc.

      Benjamin Baez, Florida International University

      Deryl F. Bailey, University of Georgia

      Ronald W. Bailey, Northeastern University

      R. Scott Baker, Wake Forest University

      Rhea Ballard-Thrower, Howard University

      W. Steven Barnett, Rutgers University

      Lezli Baskerville, National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education

      Denise Taliaferro Baszile, Miami University

      Robert A. Bennett III, The Ohio State University

      Richard D. Benson II, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Marguerite Bonous-Hammarth, University of California, Irvine

      Martha Bottia, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

      Denise Brewley-Corbin, University of Georgia

      Judith Brooks-Buck, Virginia State University

      Anthony L. Brown, The University of Texas at Austin

      Keffrelyn D. Brown, The University of Texas at Austin

      M. Christopher Brown II, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

      Shelly Lynne Brown-Jeffy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

      Arthur L. Burnett, Superior Court of the District of Columbia

      Melanie Carter, Howard University

      Melody L. Carter, Fort Valley State University, Georgia

      Thandeka K. Chapman, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

      Kefentse K. Chike, Michigan State University

      Belinda Chiu, Duke University

      Duwania D. Clark-Turner, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Jamye Coleman Williams, Tennessee State University (retired)

      Tracy Cummings, Vanderbilt University

      Stephanie M. Curenton, Rutgers University

      Luellen Curry, Wake Forest University School of Law

      Gloria M. Dabiri, New York State Supreme Court

      Pero G. Dagbovie, Michigan State University

      T. Elon Dancy II, University of Oklahoma

      Catherine Darrow, Vanderbilt University

      Adenike Marie Davidson, Fisk University

      Ryan J. Davis, University of Maryland

      George J. Sefa Dei, University of Toronto

      Jeannine E. Dingus, University of Rochester

      Richard H. Dinkins, Judge, Tennessee Court of Appeals, Middle Section

      Marc Dollinger, San Francisco State University

      Jamel K. Donnor, California State University, Fullerton

      Noah D. Drezner, University of MarylandCollege Park

      Daniel A. Espinosa, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Carlton A. G. Eversley, Winston Salem State University

      Cheryl Fields-Smith, University of Georgia

      Donna Y. Ford, Vanderbilt University

      Signithia Fordham, University of Rochester

      Janice B. Fournillier, Georgia State University

      Gary France, DDS (retired)

      Patrice A. Fulcher, Attorney at Law

      Crystal R. Gafford Muhammad, East Carolina University

      Crystal Alesia Gaines, Judge, Municipal Court of Atlanta

      Marybeth Gasman, University of Pennsylvania

      Seyoum Gelaye, Fort Valley State University

      Jesulon S. R. Gibbs, South Carolina State University

      Sheila H. Gillams, Medgar Evers College, The City University of New York

      Lathardus Goggins II, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

      Victor M. Goode, The City University of New York

      John S. Gooden, Alabama State University

      Mark A. Gooden, University of Cincinnati

      Jessica Gordon Nembhard, University of Maryland

      Jenifer Grady, The Organization for the Advancement of Library Employees

      Brett G. Grant, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Kimberly Griffin, University of California, Los Angeles

      Kelly Morgan Gunn, University of Cincinnati

      Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Spelman College

      Jon N. Hale, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Debra Newman Ham, Morgan State University

      Ivan L. Harrell II, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College

      Monica J. Harris, University of Kentucky

      Billy Hawkins, University of Georgia

      Armando Gustavo Hernandez, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Damon Todd Hewitt, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

      Adriel Adon Hilton, Greater Baltimore Committee

      Barbara Bealor Hines, Howard University

      Maurice J. Hobson, Tuskegee University

      Sonya Douglass Horsford, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

      David Horton, University of Florida

      Helen R. Houston, Tennessee State University

      Tambra O. Jackson, University of South Carolina

      Roderick Jenkins, Louisiana State University

      Jasmine Johnson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Karen A. Johnson, University of Utah

      Lauri Johnson, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

      Stanley L. Johnson Jr., University of California, Los Angeles

      Juanita Johnson-Bailey, University of Georgia

      Angela Jones, Fisk University

      Richard L. Jones, Alabama State University

      Walter M. Kimbrough, Philander Smith College

      Kanita Kimmons-Ducloux, University of Georgia

      Joyce E. King, Georgia State University

      Lonnie King Jr., Georgia State University

      M. Elizabeth Kirkland, Fisk University

      Christina M. Kirou, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Michael W. Klein, New Jersey Association of State Colleges and Universities

      Michelle G. Knight-Diop, Teachers College, Columbia University

      Brou Kouakou, Fort Valley State University

      Chamara J. Kwakye, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Olanipekun Oladotun Laosebikan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Bill E. Lawson, University of Memphis

      Russell P. Lieberman, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Eugene A. Lincoln, University of Pittsburgh

      Tondra L. Loder-Jackson, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Kofi Lomotey, Southern University and A&M College

      Vicki Vernon Lott, Lane College

      Valerie C. Lundy-Wagner, University of Pennsylvania

      Tryan L. McMickens, University of Pennsylvania

      Jeffrey Menzise, Fisk University

      Roslyn Arlin Mickelson, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

      Joyce E. Kyle Miller, Texas A&M University–Commerce

      H. Richard Milner IV, Vanderbilt Peabody College

      Laurie Mireles, University of California, Berkeley

      Reavis L. Mitchell Jr., Fisk University

      Roland W. Mitchell, Louisiana State University

      Carla R. Monroe, University of Georgia

      Alejandra S. Moreno, Florida International University Law School

      Ernest Morrell, University of California, Los Angeles

      Curtis L. Morris, Memphis City Schools

      Jerome E. Morris, University of Georgia

      Vivian Gunn Morris, University of Memphis

      Zakiyyah R. Muhammad, Institute for the Study of Muslims in America

      Athena D. Mutua, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

      Aama Nahuja, Southern University and A&M College

      Rachel B. Nall, Georgia State University

      Keri Norris, Spelman College

      Rochelle J. Nunez, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Imari Abubakari Obadele, House of Songhay, Inc.

      Robert T. Palmer, The State University of New York–Birmingham

      Lynette Parker, University of California, Berkeley

      Eileen R. Carlton Parsons, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

      Daniel Perlstein, University of California, Berkeley

      Ravi Kumar Perry, Brown University

      Sheila Renee Peters, Fisk University

      Regina Peterson, Tennessee State University

      Kristie J. R. Phillips, Brigham Young University

      Adrienne Pickett, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Abul Pitre, Fayetteville State University

      D. Zizwe Poe, Lincoln University

      Tiffany D. Pogue, Emory University

      Alton B. Pollard III, Howard University

      Luis Ponjuan, University of Florida

      Detra Price-Dennis, The Ohio State University

      Gian C. Ratnapala, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Nichole M. Ray, University of Georgia

      Chantae Recasner, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College

      Richard J. Reddick, The University of Texas at Austin

      Berlisha M. Ricard, Southern University and A&M College

      Ishwanzya D. Rivers, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Shariba Rivers, DeSable Leadership Academy, Chicago

      Brooks B. Robinson, Keller Graduate School of Management

      Tracy R. Rone, Morgan State University

      John L. Rury, University of Kansas

      Albert L. Samuels, Southern University

      Kijua Sanders-McMurtry, Agnes Scott College

      Carter Julian Savage, Boys & Girls Clubs of America

      Janelle T. Scott, University of California, Berkeley

      Clovis E. Semmes, Eastern Michigan University

      Vanessa Dodo Seriki, The Ohio State University

      Charol Shakeshaft, Virginia Commonwealth University

      Catherine J. Shaw, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Mwalimu J. Shujaa, Southern University and A&M College

      Michele Jean Sims, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Bettye P. Smith, University of Georgia

      Jessie Carney Smith, Fisk University

      Claire Smrekar, Vanderbilt University

      Peter A. Sola, Howard University

      Christopher M. Span, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

      Michael L. Spotts, Attorney, Private Practice, Atlanta, GA

      Jonathan Stadler, Fisk University

      Dorothy S. Strickland, Rutgers University

      Bianca Ayanna Suárez, University of California, Berkeley

      Jocelyn D. Taliaferro, North Carolina State University

      Thomas H. Terrill, Fort Valley State University

      Sharita Jacobs Thompson, Gettysburg College

      Dana Thompson Dorsey, University of Illinois at Springfield

      Nancy D. Tolson, Mitchell College

      Michelle Frazier Trotman, University of West Georgia

      Stephanie Marie Villavicencio, St. Thomas University School of Law

      Deborah L. Voltz, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Adah L. Ward Randolph, Ohio University

      William H. Watkins, University of Illinois at Chicago

      Andrette Watson, Green, Johnson & Landers, LLP, Atlanta, GA

      Manya Whitaker, Vanderbilt University

      Dorothy Y. White, University of Georgia

      Adair F. White-johnson, Argosy University

      Gilman W. Whiting, Vanderbilt University

      Sheneka M. Williams, University of Georgia

      Joy Williamson-Lott, University of Washington

      Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, University of Pennsylvania

      Raymond Wolters, University of Delaware

      Kristy F. Woods, Medical Consultant, State of North Carolina

      Donna A. M. Wright, Medgar Evers College, The City University of New York

      Dwayne C. Wright, Cleveland State University

      Earl Wright II, Texas Southern University

      Linda T. Wynn, Fisk University

      Jon A. Yasin, Bergen Community College

      Eboni M. Zamani-Gallaher, Eastern Michigan University

      Introduction

      The Field

      We know that Africans had both formal and informal education on the African continent prior to their arrival in the Americas. The education of Africans who were forcibly brought to the Americas continued once they arrived on these shores in the 1600s. They arrived as Africans and later came to be referred to by a number of names, including Negro, Colored, Black, Afro American, and African Americans—the designation which we have chosen to use in this encyclopedia. For enslaved Africans, upon their arrival on these shores, education took place in the woods, in the quarters of the enslaved and elsewhere—in spite of the fact that it was illegal. In the United States, Prince Hall, Richard Allen, and others started schools during the 1700s. The so-called native schools operated by African American women also operated during enslavement, as did the Sabbath Schools; both are described in this encyclopedia. More expansive formal education for African Americans followed the elimination of their legal physical bondage.

      Postenslavement education in the United States for African Americans has been both public and private, parochial and secular, segregated and integrated—and desegregated. It is primarily this formal education of the previously enslaved that we address in this two-volume collection—from preschool through professional school.

      For African Americans, to be sure, there have been challenges and successes—high points and low points—at every level of education and, indeed, in every region of the United States. There have been protests, killings, school closings, and legal battles emanating from educational issues—at every level.

      In the 21st century, the view persists that the quality of education afforded African Americans is inferior to that provided for their white counterparts. There remain questions of fiscal discrimination, teacher quality inequities, and other illegitimate barriers to quality education for African Americans. Elsewhere, I have argued that the disenfranchisement of African Americans in education has been persistent, pervasive, and disproportionate. (Lomotey, 1990).

      Rationale

      Although many books, articles, dissertations, theses, films, and journals have focused totally or in part on aspects of African American education, this encyclopedia is the first reference work to address this topic both historically and in the context of the 21st century. It is by far the most comprehensive encyclopedia on the subject, and it will have tremendous utility for a wide variety of users. Of course, librarians in academic as well as public libraries will use it as a primary reference guide available to individuals interested in education generally and African American education in particular. Scholars of education will find the topics in the encyclopedia of value in their work. Students—undergraduate and graduate—will find the volumes useful in education courses and in other social science courses. In addition, teachers at all levels should find much of value to them as they seek to facilitate the best possible teaching/learning process for their students—regardless of their racial backgrounds.

      Origin

      I was approached in 2005 by SAGE and asked to consider editing this encyclopedia. I was honored and humbled, but wondered if I had the time. I subsequently agreed and quickly began identifying my proposed editorial advisors and developing a Reader's Guide and the proposed list of entries. Twice, our staff (i.e., editor, editorial assistants, and editorial advisors) met at annual meetings of the American Educational Research Association to get updates and to fine-tune the process. The effort has been continuously supported by the staff at SAGE, and in the final analysis, I am convinced that the project has been an important and valuable one.

      The 212 contributors to these volumes are an outstanding group of distinguished students, scholars, and practitioners. I am honored to have been involved in this project with each of them. They are young and seasoned, professors and educational administrators, law students and practicing attorneys. Perhaps most important, we have taken great pains to ensure that all of the entries are accessible to readers who may be unfamiliar with the field.

      Overview

      The encyclopedia is intended to provide relatively short entries on numerous topics. It contains 247 entries, ranging from approximately 1,000 words to 4,000 words. Each of the topics is discussed as it relates to the education of African Americans. Most of the contributors have included suggested further readings should the reader be so inclined. Cross-references at the end of entries refer the reader to related entries within the encyclopedia.

      For easy access to the subject, the Reader's Guide appears in the front matter of each volume. This guide lists the entries relevant to the following 16 general subject areas, with entries sometimes appearing in more than one category:

      • Alternative Educational Models
      • Associations and Organizations
      • Biographies
      • Collegiate Education
      • Curriculum
      • Economics
      • Gender
      • Graduate and Professional Education
      • Historically Black Colleges and Universities
      • Legal Cases
      • Precollegiate Education
      • Psychology and Human Development
      • Publications
      • Public Policy
      • Religious Institutions and Schooling
      • Segregation and Desegregation

      Following the A–Z entries is the Appendix, which consists of a chronological listing of the tables of contents from each issue of the Journal of Negro Education, from its origin in 1932 through 2008. At the time of its founding, no other scholarly publication provided comprehensive coverage concerning the education of persons of African descent in the United States and elsewhere. The Appendix provides an overview of more than seven decades of work in this field.

      Language

      A word about language. I believe that words are very important and that they invariably deliver multiple lessons/messages. Generally, we have not used terms such as “slave,” “slavery,” and “ex-slave,” because these terms objectify people. That is, they suggest that these people were not people, but were, instead, things/slaves. We have used “enslaved African,” “enslaved African American,” “enslavement,” “formerly enslaved African,” or “formerly enslaved African American”—emphasizing their humanity.

      In most cases, we have used “the United States” or “U.S.” (for example, “U.S. citizen”), as opposed to “America” or “American.” There are, of course, three Americas (i.e., North America, South American and Central America). To me, it seems a bit presumptuous or even arrogant to refer to a country that is only a part of one of three Americas as “America.”

      Finally, we have attempted to distinguish between “integration” and “desegregation.” Barbara Sizemore makes the distinction, noting that desegregation is the forced placement into a diverse group, while integration is the free movement of individuals in and out of diverse groups (Sizemore, 1972).

      In each of the instances noted above, of course, quotes and common terms, such as “Black Codes” and “American Dream” are left intact.

      Acknowledgments

      I am appreciative of the editors of the Journal of Negro Education for allowing us to include their complete bibliography of all of the articles that appeared in the journal from the very beginning through 2008. That bibliography appears in the Appendix at the end of Volume II and is an invaluable addition to this encyclopedia.

      I want to acknowledge a number of other people without whom this encyclopedia would not have been done. When I first started working on the encyclopedia in 2006, Tamiko Black was my first managing editor. Her work was invaluable, as she established the encyclopedia office, made many of the initial contacts with prospective contributors, and served as a liaison between our office and the editorial advisors—and SAGE. Tamiko made many useful suggestions that ultimately benefited the encyclope-dia—and she pushed me when I could not seem to find the time to do what needed to be done.

      When I moved to Baton Rouge in 2008, I was fortunate enough to secure the services of Berlisha Ricard as my new managing editor. Berlisha is a quick study and immediately got up to speed in communication with the editorial advisors, the contributors, and SAGE. The transition from Fisk to Southern was made much smoother because of Berlisha. She was also good at pushing me to fulfill my responsibilities associated with the encyclopedia.

      My wife, A. Nahuja, was a second managing editor throughout the project, with responsibilities primarily associated with the legal entries; she also worked with me during the copyediting process. She identified the large majority of the legal contributors, edited each of the entries, and maintained regular dialogue with the contributors throughout the process. She also contributed several legal entries. As my mate for more than 30 years, our relationship is, of course, priceless and she provided much more throughout the process. I love her more than life itself.

      Each of the editorial board members—Joy Williamson-Lott, Adrienne Dixson, Jerome E. Morris, William A. Smith, and Melody L. Carter—was extremely helpful from beginning to end. They provided numerous suggestions for contributors; they offered invaluable input regarding appropriate and inappropriate entries; and, of course, they edited several of the final entries—and contributed some also. I enjoyed working with each of them and I am proud to continue to call each one of them my friend.

      The encyclopedia is made up of 247 entries, with 176 lead authors, and a total of 212 authors. Each of them carefully followed the guidelines, meticulously connected his or her topic to the education of African Americans, and provided entries that added to the strength of a great collection of entries. I am grateful to each of them.

      My good friend, Mwalimu J. Shujaa, is one of the brightest human beings I have ever known. For nearly every project with which I have been involved over the past 30 years, I have—in one way or the other—sought and received his brilliant insights and advice. This encyclopedia was no exception. I love him like a brother.

      Adenike Davidson, a colleague at Fisk and a contributor to this encyclopedia, made several useful suggestions for contributors to the volumes and read a few of the early drafts of entries for me. Her friendship is greatly appreciated.

      Diana Axelsen, development editor at SAGE, clearly is an expert at what she does. At every challenge/impasse/decision point, she quickly articulated the issue—often before I was able to—and—equally as quickly—made concrete and practical suggestions as though she had just recently addressed challenges like the ones we had. She suggested contributors; she did it all. Every issue that came up, Diana was there to help. That made the process run more smoothly and certainly brought it to a quicker conclusion.

      Carla Freeman, the production editor for this project from SAGE, was a welcome breath of fresh air from the day she first e-mailed her introductory message to me; it was a joy working with her. She is truly a professional. Also very helpful, supportive, and patient during the copyediting process were copy editors Renee Willers and Pam Suwinsky.

      Rolf Janke, publisher, and Leticia Gutierrez, systems coordinator, at SAGE were also very supportive of me and of the project. Without their support, guidance and patience, I doubt that the project would have been completed.

      Each of these individuals made invaluable contributions that added much to this encyclopedia; however, the reader should be very clear that any faults/shortcomings/limitations of this encyclopedia are my responsibility—totally.

      Enjoy.

      KofiLomoteySouthern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
      References
      Lomotey, K. (Ed.). (1990).Introduction. Going to school: The African American experience.Albany: State University of New York Press.
      Sizemore, B.Is there a case for separate schools?Phi Delta Kappan53(5)(1972)281–284.
    • Appendix: The Complete Bibliography of <span class="hi-italic">The Journal of Negro Education</span>, 1932&#8211;2008 (9.1 MB)

      Introduction

      The Journal of Negro Education is pleased to contribute the complete bibliography of our first 76 years of continuous publication to The Encyclopedia of African American Education. The bibliography was originally published in the spring 2006 issue under the leadership of Dr. Frederick D. Harper, who served as Editor-in-Chief from 2004–2008. The complete bibliography of The Journal of Negro Education from 1932–2006 commemorated our 75th volume year. Since spring 2006, we have published 11 issues, including 3 special issues: Research and Its Impact on Educational Policy and Practice in summer 2006, Looking Beyond the Digital Divide in winter 2007, and Learning Communities in the Higher Education of African Americans in summer 2008. In summer 2007, we released the Diamond Anniversary Issue of The Journal of Negro Education, coedited by Editor-in-Chief Emeritus Dr. Faustine C. Jones-Wilson and Dr. Veronica G. Thomas.

      In the summer of 2008, Dr. Ivory A. Toldson was selected to serve as the seventh Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Negro Education. As a member of Howard University's counseling psychology faculty and senior research analyst for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Dr. Toldson has led initiatives to place the Journal in a position to influence federal-level educational policy. As we follow changes in educational legislation under the Obama administration and the cultural changes as American society becomes more diverse and inclusive, presently the Journal is focused on research that provides solutions for the persistent achievement gaps between races, the education of Black people in the Diaspora, interdisciplinary educational research, and research that celebrates our legacy and builds on strengths instead of focusing on deficits. The Journal of Negro Education will continue to be “a Howard University quarterly review of issues incident to the education of Black people.”

      Ivory A.Toldson Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Negro Education

      The Journal of Negro Education is published under the auspices of the School of Education, Howard University, Washington DC 20059. The bibliography and reprinted articles in this appendix are copyrighted by Howard University and are included here by permission. Further information about the journal is available on its Web site: http://www.journalnegroed.org.

      Full-text articles from The Journal of Negro Education are available from JSTOR, at http://www.jstor.org through participating libraries. JSTOR is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to creating and preserving a digital archive of scholarly journals.

      Editor's Comments: The Complete Bibliography of The Journal of Negro Education, 1932–2006, by Frederick D. Harper (Spring 2006 Issue)

      As the spring 2006 issue, The Journal of Negro Education (JNE) is pleased to publish the complete bibliography of all articles printed in The Journal since its founding in 1932. When I assumed editorship of The Journal in 2004, one of my goals was to develop a bibliographic listing of all published JNE articles by year, volume, and issue. The major purpose of developing the bibliography was to provide a valuable reference source for research and teaching. Failing to receive a small grant to carry out the project, The Journal staff agreed to carve out time to produce the bibliography. All staff members, including the Editor-in-Chief, participated in typing, proof-reading, and formatting what has become the content of this special publication.

      To a degree, the bibliography chronicles historical and educational developments of people of African descent in the U.S. and other sectors of the world over a span of more than 74 years. During these years, JNE articles have documented events, published survey results and other research findings, promulgated theoretical and philosophical thoughts, profiled outstanding educational leaders and scholars, and discussed legislative acts and judicial decisions as related to the education and welfare of Black people. Moreover, as a significant archive and contribution to Black studies, JNE articles, over the years, have documented important events of Black history and the various conditions of race relations throughout the world (e.g., see Bunche, 1934, 1940, 1950; Du Bois, 1941, 1946; Logan, 1946, 1955; May, 1937).

      The Journal of Negro Education began publishing during a time in U.S. history when there were very few Black, scholarly journals. Furthermore, this was a time when traditionally White journals very often excluded articles related to Black people, or they tended to publish racially biased and negative articles regarding Blacks. Therefore, The Journal of Negro Education filled a void and became a major forum for articles by and/or about Black people.

      Over the decades of its existence, The Journal has published articles by some of America's eminent leaders, literary figures, and educational scholars—both Black and non-Black authors. In addition, it has published works of authors from Canada and numerous countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. Presented in Table 1 by name, year of publication, and number of articles are fine examples of distinguished Black scholars who authored or coauthored three or more articles in The Journal of Negro Education during its earlier decades (1930s through the 1960s). As noted in Table 1, these outstanding JNE authors include Horace M. Bond, Ralph J. Bunche, Kenneth B. Clark, W. Montague Cobb, W. E. B. Du Bois, John Hope Franklin, E. Franklin Frazier, Charles H. Houston, Charles S. Johnson, Alain L. Locke, Rayford W. Logan, Benjamin E. Mays, Frederick D. Patterson, Dorothy B. Porter, and Robert C. Weaver. Other notable Black scholars who authored or coauthored in the JNE during this time period include James A. Bayton (1942, 1949), Sterling A. Brown (1933, 1939), Allison Davis (1939), Arthur P. Davis (1962), Dorothy I. Height (1945), Thurgood Marshall (Marshall, 1952, 1957; Carter & Marshall, 1955), A. Philip Randolph (1936), Lucy Slowe (1933), Arthur B. Spingarn (1938), and Clemmont E. Vontress (1966, 1968, 1969).

      Table 1 Eminent Authors Who Published Multiple Times in The Journal of Negro Education by Name, Year of Publication, and Number (N) of Articles Published
      NameYear of PublicationN of Articles Published in JNE
      Horace Mann Bond(Bond, 1932, 1935a, 1935b, 1937a, 1937b, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1952, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961; Johnson & Bond, 1934)19
      Ralph J. Bunche(Bunche, 1934, 1935, 1936a, 1936b, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1950)8
      Kenneth B. Clark(Clark, 1943, 1959, 1967, 1988; Clark & Clark, 1950)5
      W. Montague Cobb(Cobb, 1934, 1939, 1949, 1951, 1958)5
      W. E. B. Du Bois(Du Bois, 1932, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1943, 1946)9
      John Hope Franklin(Franklin, 1948, 1956, 1957)3
      E. Franklin Frazier(Frazier, 1933, 1935, 1936, 1939, 1940, 1944, 1950, 1961)8
      Charles H. Houston(Houston, 1935, 1938, 1943)3
      Charles S. Johnson(Johnson, 1935, 1936, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944a, 1944b, 1944c, 1949, 1951, 1954, 1957; Johnson & Bond, 1934)15
      Alain L. Locke(Locke, 1935, 1939, 1944a, 1944b, 1945)5
      Rayford W. Logan(Logan, 1933, 1940, 1941, 1946, 1955, 1958, 1961, 1963)8
      Benjamin E. Mays(Mays, 1933, 1937, 1940, 1942, 1945, 1950, 1952, 1959, 1960)9
      Frederick D. Patterson(Patterson, 1936, 1942, 1952, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1966; Trent & Patterson, 1958)8
      Dorothy B. Porter(Porter, 1936a, 1936b, 1943, 1952, 1963)5
      Robert C. Weaver(Weaver, 1938a, 1938b, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1947, 1950, 1953, 1956, 1960a, 1960b, 1960c; Weaver & Gabel, 1957)13

      Among eminent White authors who published in The Journal of Negro Education during its early decades were Nobel Prize novelist, Pearl S. Buck (1942); former University of Chicago President, Robert M. Hutchins (1941); and former First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt (1934), who listed her authorship as Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt.

      In recent decades, since 1970, The Journal has published articles by scores of notable authors, who are too numerous to name in the space of this editorial. However, some of these JNE authors who pioneered their scholarly areas of interest or who have broad professional recognition include Molefi Kete Asante (1991), James A. Banks (1979, 1995), Andrew Billingsley (1982), A. Wade Boykin (1984), Johnnetta B. Cole (2001), James P. Comer (1989), Lisa D. Delpit (1992), Jacqueline Fleming (1981), Mary Hatwood Futrell (1999), Edmund W. Gordon (1985), Asa G. Hilliard (1983, 1992), Jacqueline Jordan Irvine (1999), Joyce A. Ladner (1987), Gloria Ladson-Billings (1991, 1998), Beverly Lindsay (1980, 1994, 2004), Harriette Pipes McAdoo (1991), John U. Ogbu (1990), Alvin F. Poussaint (Poussaint & Atkinson, 1968), Mwalimu J. Shujaa (1992), and Charles V. Willie (1987, 1994, 2000).

      Some of the classic articles published in The Journal of Negro Education, since its founding, include Clark and Clark's (1950) study of Black children's preference for White vs. Black dolls, research that contributed to the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education (1954) decision. Moreover, there is Du Bois's (1935) often-quoted article that discusses the pros and cons of “separate” Black schools versus “mixed” schools (p. 328). In addition, there is Ralph Bunche's (1940) call for Blacks in academia to be “public intellectuals” and, thus, have a positive influence on moral and political issues that are relevant to Black people. In The Journal's recent special issue on Ralph Bunche, celebrating the centenary year of his birth, Holloway (2004, p. 130) states, “ … Bunche believed that intellectuals and universities had an extremely important role to play in shaping the public's morality and politics.”

      In addition, The Journal has published numerous themed issues (special issues, special focus issues, and yearbooks) that are identified within this bibliography. A few examples of these JNE special publications, by theme, include hip-hop, rap, and oppositional culture (summer, 2005); special education and the achievement gap (fall, 2005); Ralph J. Bunche and education (spring, 2004); commercialism and youth (fall, 2003); juvenile justice (summer, 2002); recruiting, preparing, and retaining qualified teachers (summer, 1999); education in South Africa (fall, 1997); education of children in a violent society (summer, fall, 1996); Black males and education (winter, 1992; fall, 1994); racism and education (spring, 1991); mathematics, science, and technology (summer, 1990); Head Start (winter, 1989); Black language, Ebonics, and education (winter, 1983; winter, 1998); Black women and education (summer, 1982; summer, 2001); assessment and testing (summer, 1980; summer, 1986; summer, 1998); Brown v. Board of Education on its 40th and 50th anniversaries (summer, 1994; summer, 2004); Black studies (summer, 1984); Africentrism and multiculturalism (summer, 1979; summer, 1992); urban education and schools (summer, 1975; summer, 1988); international education as related to the Black Diaspora (summer, 1941; summer, 1946; summer, 1961; summer, 1987); equal educational opportunity (summer, 1968); racial desegregation (summer, 1954; winter, 1978); health status and health education (summer, 1937; summer, 1949); leadership and higher education (summer, 1933; winter, 2004).

      In developing this bibliography, we learned a number of things that are worth bringing to the attention of JNE readers. For example, upon realizing that punctuation and terminology have changed over the decades, we held in almost all cases to remain true to the actual punctuation and language of the titles as printed. For example, in publications of the early decades, authors tended to use a dash, instead of a colon, to separate the main title of an article from the subtitle. Also, in a series (seriation) of three or more items within a sentence, a comma was often omitted before “and,” which is unlike today's formal writing of U.S. English. Moreover, the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, as we know it today, did not exist during the early period of JNE publishing, and it was not adopted as the publication style for The Journal until 1990 (see the current or 5th edition of the manual, American Psychological Association, 2001).

      In several cases, while developing the bibliography, the JNE staff found that the titles and page numbers of articles printed in the table of contents did not match up precisely with those on the actual title page of the article or the actual pagination of the article. For example, a word or spelling of a name varied or a page number was off by one digit. Although such cases were very rare and expected in decades of published journal issues, the JNE staff adopted a rule to use bibliographic information from the title page of the printed article and the actual beginning and ending page numbers from the printed article. In other words, we relied on the printed text of articles and not the table of contents of issues or electronic copies of articles from the Internet.

      The development and presentation of this bibliography is only a beginning toward exploring what has been published in The Journal of Negro Education and what is available for research, teaching, and learning. It is our purpose to update this document from time to time as new articles are published. Moreover, we plan to carry out qualitative content analyses of the articles in the bibliography by various categories such as by topic, author/s, educational context, educational level, period or time of publication, geographic area of focus, and method of research, among other categories of analysis.

      I cannot conclude this editorial without mentioning that The Journal of Negro Education could not have existed in perpetuity for more than 74 years without the budgetary support of Howard University; the administrative/faculty support of its School of Education; and the dedicated, persevering, and unselfish work of The Journal's Editors-in-Chief and staff over these years. As we showcase the totality of published work in The Journal, it is appropriate to acknowledge those who toiled for years to make The Journal go and to keep it in print. Foremost, the founder and first Editor-in-Chief, Charles H. Thompson, served admirably in this capacity for 31 and one-half years (1932–1963). Faustine C. Jones-Wilson, the fifth and second-longest-tenured Editor-in-Chief, served for a total of 13-plus years (1978–1992). Other Editors-in-Chief who served unselfishly and made unique contributions to the publication of titled articles in this bibliography and the ongoing promulgation of The Journal include Walter G. Daniels (1963–1970), Earle H. West (Acting Editor-in-Chief, 1970–1973), Charles A. Martin (1973–1978), Sylvia T. Johnson (1993–2001), and Rc Saravanabhavan (2001–2004).

      It is noteworthy to acknowledge two Associate Editors who each labored for 10 years or more in the editorial production of manuscripts into articles and the perpetual assurance of JNE's scholarly integrity. These two persons are Theresa A. Rector and Kamili Anderson. Theresa Rector worked for The Journal a total of 27 years, initially as Assistant Editor and most of her years as Associate Editor/Business Manager (Jones-Wilson, 1988). Kamili Anderson served as Associate Editor/ Business Manager for 10 years. In addition, Heather H. Austin served three years as Associate Editor and the late Mahmoud Gudarzi was employed 18 years as Circulation Manager/Editorial Assistant.

      Lastly, I take this opportunity to acknowledge JNE staff members who contributed to the development of this bibliography during the 2004–2006 work period of the project. These fulltime, part-time, and graduate student contributors include Abraham Owusu-Afriyie (part-time Computer Tech Specialist, 2004–2006), Michael Guilbault (Graduate Assistant, 2005–2006), Lenda P. Hill (Associate Editor, 2004–2006), Sharlene R. Jacobs (Graduate Student Office Assistant, 2004–2005), Selena Jones (McNair Graduate Assistant, 2005–2006), Cynthia Joseph (Administrative Secretary, 2006), Yvonne N. Langdon (Graduate Assistant, 2004–2005), Octavia McGill (Graduate Student Research/Marketing Assistant, 2005–2006), Temika Michael (Research Assistant, summer, 2006), and Marjorie B. Wiltshire (Research Assistant/Office Manager, 2004–2005; Marketing Consultant, 2006).

      Further Readings
      American Psychological Association. (2001).Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.).Washington, DC: Author.
      Asante, M. K.The Afrocentric idea in education. The Journal of Negro Education60(1991). 170–180.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295608
      Banks, J. A.Shaping the future of multicultural education. The Journal of Negro Education48(1979). 237–252.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295045
      Banks, J. A.Multicultural education and curriculum transformation. The Journal of Negro Education64(1995). 390–400.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2967262
      Bayton, J. A.The psychology of racial morale. The Journal of Negro Education11(1942). 150–153.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292397
      Bayton, J. A.The guidance dilemma—With special reference to the guidance of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education18(1949). 465–473.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966157
      Billingsley, A.Building strong faculties in Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education51(1982). 4–15.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294645
      Bond, H. M.Negro education: A debate in the Alabama Constitutional Convention of 1901. The Journal of Negro Education1(1932). 49–59.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292015
      Bond, H. M.The curriculum and the Negro child. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935a). 159–168.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292330
      Bond, H. M.The extent and character of separate schools in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935b). 321–327.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291870
      Bond, H. M.The influence of personalities on the public education of Negroes in Alabama, I. The Journal of Negro Education6(1937a). 17–29.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291985
      Bond, H. M.The influence of personalities on the public education of Negroes in Alabama, II. The Journal of Negro Education6(1937b). 172–187.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292254
      Bond, H. M.Redefining the relationship of the federal government to the education of racial and other minority groups. The Journal of Negro Education7(1938). 454–459.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291905
      Bond, H. M.The position of the Negro in the American social order in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 583–586.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292653
      Bond, H. M.The educational and other social implications of the impact of the present crisis upon racial minorities. The Journal of Negro Education10(1941). 617–622.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292764
      Bond, H. M.The Negro in the armed forces of the United States prior to World War I. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 268–287.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293045
      Bond, H. M.What the San Francisco Conference means to the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education14(1945). 627–630.
      Bond, H. M.Education for political and social responsibility: Its natural history in the American college. The Journal of Negro Education16(1947). 165–171.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966184
      Bond, H. M.The evolution and present status of Negro higher and professional education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education17(1948). 224–235.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966359
      Bond, H. M.Improving the morale of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education19(1950). 408–411.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966498
      Bond, H. M.Racial integration in the United States, with especial reference to education. The Journal of Negro Education21(1952). 241–249.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293363
      Bond, H. M.Cat on a hot tin roof. The Journal of Negro Education27(1958). 519–525.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293800
      Bond, H. M.Talent—and toilets. The Journal of Negro Education28(1959). 3–14.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293386
      Bond, H. M.The origin and development of the Negro church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education29(1960). 217–226.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293637
      Bond, H. M.Some major educational problems in Africa south of the Sahara: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education30(1961). 358–364.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294324
      Boykin, A. W.Reading achievement and the social-cultural frame of reference of Afro-American children. The Journal of Negro Education53(1984). 464–473.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295126
      Brown, S. A.Negro character as seen by White authors. The Journal of Negro Education2(1933). 179–203.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292236
      Brown, S. A.The American race problem as reflected in American literature. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 275–290.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292629
      Brown v. Board of Education, Topeka, Kansas, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).
      Buck, P. S.Breaking the barriers of race prejudice. The Journal of Negro Education11(1942). 444–453.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292684
      Bunche, R. J.French educational policy in Togo and Dahomey. The Journal of Negro Education3(1934). 69–97.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292143
      Bunche, R. J.A critical analysis of the tactics and programs of minority groups. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935). 308–320.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291869
      Bunche, R. J.A critique of New Deal social planning as it affects Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936a). 59–65.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292355
      Bunche, R. J.Education in Black and White. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936b). 351–358.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292107
      Bunche, R. J.The programs of organizations devoted to the improvement of the status of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 539–550.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292650
      Bunche, R. J.The role of the university in the political orientation of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education9(1940). 571–579.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292802
      Bunche, R. J.The Negro in the political life of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education10(1941). 567–584.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292760
      Bunche, R. J.Democracy: A world issue. The Journal of Negro Education19(1950). 431–438.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2965930
      Carter, R. L.Marshall, T.The meaning and significance of the Supreme Court decree. The Journal of Negro Education24(1955). 397–404.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293469
      Clark, K. B.The morale of the Negro on the home front. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 417–428.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293061
      Clark, K. B.Color, class, personality and juvenile delinquency. The Journal of Negro Education28(1959). 240–251.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293104
      Clark, K. B.Higher education for Negroes: Challenges and prospects. The Journal of Negro Education36(1967). 196–203.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294447
      Clark, K. B.The Brown decision: Racism, education, and human values. The Journal of Negro Education57(1988). 125–132.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295443
      Clark, K. B.Clark, M. P.Emotional factors in racial identification and preference in Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education19(1950). 341–350.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966491
      Cobb, W. M.The physical constitution of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education3(1934). 340–388.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292378
      Cobb, W. M.The Negro as a biological element in the American population. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 336–348.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292634
      Cobb, W. M.Special problems in the provision of medical services for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education18(1949). 340–345.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966140
      Cobb, W. M.The Negro nurse and the nation's health. The Journal of Negro Education20(1951). 126–130.
      Cobb, W. M.Not to the swift: Progress and prospects of the Negro in science and the professions. The Journal of Negro Education27(1958). 120–126.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293731
      Cole, J. B.Epilogue. The Journal of Negro Education70(2001). 231.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3211213
      Comer, J. P.Child development and education. The Journal of Negro Education58(1989). 125–139.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295587
      Davis, A.The socialization of the American Negro child and adolescent. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 264–274.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292628
      Davis, A. P.E. Franklin Frazier (1894–1962): A profile. The Journal of Negro Education31(1962). 429–435.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293961
      Delpit, L. D.Education in a multicultural society: Our future's greatest challenge. The Journal of Negro Education61(1992). 237–249.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295245
      Du Bois, W. E. B.Education and work. The Journal of Negro Education1(1932). 60–74.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292016
      Du Bois, W. E. B.Does the Negro need separate schools?The Journal of Negro Education4(1935). 328–335.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291871
      Du Bois, W. E. B.Social planning for the Negro, past and present. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936). 110–125.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292363
      Du Bois, W. E. B.How Negroes have taken advantage of educational opportunities offered by friends. The Journal of Negro Education7(1938). 124–131.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291822
      Du Bois, W. E. B.The position of the Negro in the American social order: Where do we go from here?The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 551–570.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292651
      Du Bois, W. E. B.The future of Wilberforce University. The Journal of Negro Education9(1940). 553–570.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292801
      Du Bois, W. E. B.Neuropa: Hitler's new world order. The Journal of Negro Education10(1941). 380–386.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292742
      Du Bois, W. E. B.The Negro soldier in service abroad during the first World War. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 324–335.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293050
      Du Bois, W. E. B.Colonies and moral responsibility. The Journal of Negro Education15(1946). 311–318.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966102
      Fleming, J.Stress and satisfaction in the college years of Black students. The Journal of Negro Education50(1981). 307–318.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295160
      Franklin, J. H.Whither reconstruction historiography?The Journal of Negro Education17(1948). 446–461.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966233
      Franklin, J. H.Desegregation—The South's newest dilemma. The Journal of Negro Education25(1956). 95–100.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293567
      Franklin, J. H.“Legal” disfranchisement of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education26(1957). 241–248.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293406
      Frazier, E. F.Graduate education in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of xNegro Education2(1933). 329–341.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292203
      Frazier, E. F.The status of the Negro in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935). 293–307.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291868
      Frazier, E. F.A critical summary of articles contributed to symposium on Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936). 531–533.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292131
      Frazier, E. F.The present status of the Negro family in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 376–382.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292637
      Frazier, E. F.The Negro family and Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education9(1940). 290–299.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292600
      Frazier, E. F.The role of Negro schools in the post-war world. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944). 464–473.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292494
      Frazier, E. F.Problems and needs of Negro children and youth resulting from familyThe Journal of Negro Education19(1950). 269–277.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966484
      Frazier, E. F.Urbanization and its effects upon the task of nation-building in Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education30(1961). 214–222.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294309
      Futrell, M. H.The challenge of the 21st century: Developing a highly qualified cadre of teachers to teach our nation's diverse student population. The Journal of Negro Education68(1999). 318–334.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2668104
      Gordon, E. W.Social science knowledge production and minority experiences. The Journal of Negro Education54(1985). 117–133.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294927
      Height, D. I.The adult education program of the YWCA among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education14(1945). 390–395.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293005
      Hilliard, A. G., IIIPsychological factors associated with language in the education of the African-American child. The Journal of Negro Education52(1983). 24–34.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294745
      Hilliard, A. G., IIIBehavioral style, culture, and teaching and learning. The Journal of Negro Education61(1992). 370–377.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295254
      Holloway, J. S.Ralph Bunche and the responsibilities of the public intellectual. The Journal of Negro Education73(2004). 125–136.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3211269
      Houston, C. H.The need for Negro lawyers. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935). 49–52.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292085
      Houston, C. H.Future policies and practices which should govern the relationship of the federal government to Negro separate schools. The Journal of Negro Education7(1938). 460–462.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291906
      Houston, C. H.Critical summary: The Negro in the U.S. Armed Forces in World Wars I and II. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 364–366.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293055
      Hutchins, R. M.America and the war. The Journal of Negro Education10(1941). 435–441.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292746
      Irvine, J. J.The education of children whose nightmares come both day and night. The Journal of Negro Education69(1999). 244–253.
      Johnson, C. S.The Negro college graduate: How and where he is employed. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935). 5–22.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292081
      Johnson, C. S.On the need of realism in Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936). 375–382.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292110
      Johnson, C. S.The present status of race relations, with particular reference to the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 323–335.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292633
      Johnson, C. S.The problems and needs of the Negro adolescent in view of his minority racial status: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education9(1940). 344–353.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292605
      Johnson, C. S.The Negro and the present crisis. The Journal of Negro Education10(1941). 585–595.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292761
      Johnson, C. S.The Negro in post-war reconstruction: His hopes, fears and possibilities. The Journal of Negro Education11(1942). 465–470.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292686
      Johnson, C. S.Southern Race Relations Conference. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 133–139.
      Johnson, C. S.The American Missionary Association Institute of Race Relations. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944a). 568–574.
      Johnson, C. S.The next decade in race relations. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944b). 441–446.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292461
      Johnson, C. S.The race relations program of the American Missionary Association. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944c). 248–252.
      Johnson, C. S.The socio-economic background of Negro health status. The Journal of Negro Education18(1949). 429–435.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966151
      Johnson, C. S.American minorities and civil rights in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education20(1951). 485–493.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966020
      Johnson, C. S.Some significant social and educational implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision. The Journal of Negro Education23(1954). 364–371.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293235
      Johnson, C. S.A southern Negro's view of the South. The Journal of Negro Education26(1957). 4–9.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293316
      Johnson, C. S.Bond, H. M.The investigation of racial differences prior to 1910. The Journal of Negro Education3(1934). 328–339.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292377
      Jones-Wilson, F. C.The torch is passed. The Journal of Negro Education57(1988). 451.
      Ladner, J. A.Black teenage pregnancy: A challenge for educators. The Journal of Negro Education56(1987). 53–63.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295383
      Ladson-Billings, G.Beyond multicultural illiteracy. The Journal of Negro Education60(1991). 147–157.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295606
      Ladson-Billings, G.Teaching in dangerous times: Culturally relevant approaches to teacher assessment. The Journal of Negro Education67(1998). 255–267.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2668194
      Lindsay, B.Career aspirations of Kenyan women. The Journal of Negro Education49(1980). 423–440.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294918
      Lindsay, B.African American women and Brown: A lingering twilight or emerging dawn?The Journal of Negro Education63(1994). 430–442.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2967193
      Lindsay, B.Ralph Bunche: University and diplomatic legacies fostering innovative paradigms. The Journal of Negro Education73(2004). 105–115.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3211267
      Locke, A.The dilemma of segregation. The Journal of Negro Education4(1935). 406–411. [Locke did not use his middle initial in this publication.]http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291875
      Locke, A.The Negro's contribution to American culture. The Journal of Negro Education8(1939). 521–529. [Locke did not use his middle initial in this publication.]http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292648
      Locke, A. L.The Negro in the three Americas. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944a). 7–18.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292916
      Locke, A. L.Whither race relations? A critical commentary. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944b). 398–406.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292456
      Locke, A. L.Areas of extension and improvement of adult education among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education14(1945). 453–459.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293015
      Logan, R. W.Educational segregation in the North. The Journal of Negro Education2(1933). 65–67.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292219
      Logan, R. W.Negro youth and the influence of the press, radio, and cinema. The Journal of Negro Education9(1940). 425–434.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292614
      Logan, R. W.The crisis of democracy in the western hemisphere. The Journal of Negro Education10(1941). 344–352.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292739
      Logan, R. W.The system of international trusteeship. The Journal of Negro Education15(1946). 285–299.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966100
      Logan, R. W.The birth of African nations. The Journal of Negro Education24(1955). 157–164.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293487
      Logan, R. W.The evolution of private colleges for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education27(1958). 213–220.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293754
      Logan, R. W.Education in former French West and equatorial Africa and Madagascar. The Journal of Negro Education30(1961). 277–285.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294316
      Logan, R. W.The progress of the Negro after a century of emancipation. The Journal of Negro Education32(1963). 320–328.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294110
      Marshall, T.An evaluation of recent efforts to achieve racial integration in education through resort to the courts. The Journal of Negro Education21(1952). 316–327.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293371
      Marshall, T.The rise and collapse of the “White democratic primary.”The Journal of Negro Education26(1957). 249–254.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293407
      Mays, B. E.The education of Negro ministers. The Journal of Negro Education2(1933). 342–351.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292204
      Mays, B. E.The color line around the world. The Journal of Negro Education6(1937). 134–143.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292249
      Mays, B. E.The religious life and needs of Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education9(1940). 332–343.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292604
      Mays, B. E.The role of the Negro liberal arts college in post-war reconstruction. The Journal of Negro Education11(1942). 400–411.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292678
      Mays, B. E.Democratizing and Christianizing America in this generation. The Journal of Negro Education14(1945). 527–534.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966024
      Mays, B. E.Improving the morale of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education19(1950). 420–426.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966500
      Mays, B. E.The present status of and future outlook for racial integration in the church related White college in the South. The Journal of Negro Education21(1952). 350–351.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293375
      Mays, B. E.The role of the “Negro community” in delinquency prevention among Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education28(1959). 366–370.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293115
      Mays, B. E.The significance of the Negro private and church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education29(1960). 245–251.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293639
      McAdoo, H. P.Family values and outcomes for children. The Journal of Negro Education60(1991). 361–365.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295489
      Ogbu, J. U.Minority education in comparative perspective. The Journal of Negro Education59(1990). 45–57.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295291
      Patterson, F. D.Avenues of redirection in vocational education. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936). 495–501.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292125
      Patterson, F. D.Negro higher education's contribution to the war effort from the point of view of agriculture. The Journal of Negro Education11(1942). 314–321.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292668
      Patterson, F. D.The private Negro college in racially-integrated system of higher education. The Journal of Negro Education21(1952). 363–368.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293377
      Patterson, F. D.Education in Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education24(1955). 93–105.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293472
      Patterson, F. D.Colleges for Negro youth and the future. The Journal of Negro Education27(1958). 107–114.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293729
      Patterson, F. D.Duplication of facilities and resources of Negro church-related colleges. The Journal of Negro Education29(1960). 368–376.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293655
      Patterson, F. D.Cooperation among the predominantly Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education35(1966). 477–484.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294147
      Porter, D. B.Library sources for the study of Negro life and history. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936a). 232–244.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292160
      Porter, D. B.The organized educational activities of Negro literary societies, 1828–1846. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936b). 555–576.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292029
      Porter, D. B.Selected references on the American Negro in World War I and World War II. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 579–584.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293075
      Porter, D. B.Maria Louise Baldwin, 1856–1922. The Journal of Negro Education21(1952). 94–96.
      Porter, D. B.First International Congress of Africanists. The Journal of Negro Education32(1963). 198–204.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294407
      Poussaint, A. F.Atkinson, C. O.Negro youth and psychological motivation. The Journal of Negro Education37(1968). 241–251.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294158
      Randolph, A. P.The trade union movement and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education5(1936). 54–58.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292354
      Mrs. Roosevelt, F. D.The National Conference on the Education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education3(1934). 573–575. (Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt)http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292177
      Shujaa, M. J.Afrocentric transformation and parental choice in African American independent schools. The Journal of Negro Education61(1992). 148–159.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295412
      Slowe, L. D.Higher education of Negro women. The Journal of Negro Education2(1933). 352–358.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292205
      Spingarn, A. B.Collecting a library of Negro literature. The Journal of Negro Education7(1938). 12–18.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291771
      Trent, W. J., Jr.Patterson, F. D.Financial support of the private Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education27(1958). 398–405.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293774
      Vontress, C. E.The Negro personality reconsidered. The Journal of Negro Education35(1966). 210–217.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293940
      Vontress, C. E.Counseling Negro students for college. The Journal of Negro Education37(1968). 37–44.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294074
      Vontress, C. E.Cultural differences: Implications for counseling. The Journal of Negro Education38(1969). 266–275.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294010
      Weaver, R. C.The Public Works Administration School Building-Aid Program and separate Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education7(1938a). 366–374.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291894
      Weaver, R. C.Training Negroes for occupational opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education7(1938b). 486–497.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2291796
      Weaver, R. C.Federal aid, local control, and Negro participation. The Journal of Negro Education11(1942). 47–59.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2292948
      Weaver, R. C.The employment of the Negro in war industries. The Journal of Negro Education12(1943). 386–396.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293058
      Weaver, R. C.City of Chicago: Mayor's Committee on Race Relations. The Journal of Negro Education13(1944). 560–562.
      Weaver, R. C.A needed program of research in race relations and associated problems. The Journal of Negro Education16(1947). 130–135.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966179
      Weaver, R. C.The economic status of the Negro in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education19(1950). 232–243.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2966480
      Weaver, R. C.The relative status of the housing of Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education22(1953). 343–354.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293206
      Weaver, R. C.Some basic issues in desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education25(1956). 101–108.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293568
      Weaver, R. C.The NAACP today. The Journal of Negro Education29(1960a). 421–425.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2294212
      Weaver, R. C.The Negro private and church-related college: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education29(1960b). 394–400.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293658
      Weaver, R. C.The private Negro colleges and universities—An appraisal. The Journal of Negro Education29(1960c). 113–120.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293147
      Weaver, R. C.Gabel, H. W.Some legislative consequences of Negro disfranchisement. The Journal of Negro Education26(1957). 255–261.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2293408
      Willie, C. V.On excellence and equity in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education56(1987). 485–492.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2295346
      Willie, C. V.Black colleges are not just for Blacks anymore. The Journal of Negro Education63(1994). 153–163.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2967380
      Willie, C. V.Confidence, trust, and respect: The preeminent goals of educational reform. The Journal of Negro Education69(2000). 255–262.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2696244

      Frederick D. Harper Editor-in-Chief

      The Journal of Negro Education: A Howard University Quarterly Review of Issues Incident to the Education of Black People
      Early Charles H. Thompson Years (1932–1939)
      Volume 1Winter 1932Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1932). Why a journal of Negro education? The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 1–4.

      Articles

      Lane, D. A., Jr. (1932). The report of the National Advisory Committee on Education and the problem of Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 5–15.

      McCuistion, F. (1932). The South's Negro teaching force. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 16–24.

      Crowley, M. R. (1932). Cincinnati's experiment in Negro education: A comparative study of the segregated and mixed school. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 25–33.

      Trenholm, H. C. (1932). The accreditation of the Negro high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 34–43.

      McAlpin, A. S. (1932). Changes in the intelligence quotients of Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 44–48.

      Bond, H. M. (1932). Negro education: A debate in the Alabama Constitutional Convention of 1901. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 49–59.

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1932). Education and work. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 60–74.

      Note: In order to facilitate research and clarify titles of articles, especially where relatively unfamiliar acronyms or names are employed, a brief explanatory note is inserted within brackets. However, the bracketed information is for explanation only and not to be interpreted as a part of the title of the article. See an example below wherein the reader is informed that a high school of focus is located in the state of Illinois:

      Sims, E. R. (1988). Successful programs, policies, and practices employed at Corliss High School [IL]. The Journal of Negro Education, 57, 394–407.

      Volume 1Spring 1932Number 2

      The Present Status and Relative Progress of Preschool and Elementary Education for Negroes

      Yearbook Number 1

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1932). Editorial Note. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 99–100.

      Articles

      Thompson, C. H. (1932). Introduction. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 101–107.

      Phillips, M. R. (1932). The financial support of the Negro elementary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 108–136.

      Clark, F. G. (1932). The general administration and control. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 137–162.

      Harris, H. C. (1932). The physical equipment. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 163–195.

      Miller, C. L., & Gregg, H. D. (1932). The teaching staff. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 196–223.

      Washington, A. H. (1932). The supervision of instruction. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 224–255.

      Brooks, J. C. (1932). Student personnel. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 256–276.

      Daniel, W. G. (1932). The curriculum. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 277–303.

      Honesty, E. T. (1932). The handicapped child. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 304–324.

      Price, J. S. C. (1932). General summary and conclusions. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 325–335.

      Volume 1Summer and Fall 1932Numbers 3 and 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1932). Is there an oversupply of Negro teachers? The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 343–346.

      Articles

      Sackett, E. B. (1932). The Negro schools of the Canal Zone. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 347–353.

      Wesley, C. H. (1932). The rise of Negro education in the British Empire—I. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 354–366.

      Hudson, A. (1932). Reading achievements, interests, and habits of Negro women. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 367–373.

      Shores, L. (1932). Library service and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 374–380.

      Daniel, R. P. (1932). Personality differences between delinquent and non-delinquent Negro boys. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 381–387.

      Bousfield, M. B. (1932). The intelligence and school achievement of Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 388–395.

      Lane, R. A. (1932). Legal trends toward increased provisions for Negro education in the United States between 1920 and 1930. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 396–399.

      Oak, V. V. (1932). Commercial education in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 400–407.

      Hill, L. P. (1932). The State Teachers' College at Cheyney and its relation to segregation in the North. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 408–413.

      Phillips, M. R. (1932). The origin, development and present status of public education for Negroes in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 414–423.

      Current Events of Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1932). National meetings and conferences; Educational mergers and consolidations; Studies, investigations, and innovating practices; General educational progress and achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 1, 443–454.

      Volume 2Winter 1933Number 1

      Special Focus: Negro Education and the Depression

      Editorial Comment

      Miller, K. (1933). Negro education and the Depression. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 1–4.

      Articles

      Newbold, N. C. (1933). The public education of Negroes and the current Depression. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 5–15.

      Holmes, D. O. W. (1933). The Negro college faces the Depression. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 16–25.

      Thompson, C. H. (1933). The socio-economic status of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 26–37.

      Leavell, U. W. (1933). Trends of philanthropy in Negro education: A survey. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 38–52.

      General Articles

      Shannon, I. V. (1933). The teaching of Negro life and history in relation to some views of educators on race adjustment. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 53–64.

      Logan, R. W. (1933). Educational segregation in the North. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 65–67.

      Wesley, C. H. (1933). The rise of Negro education in the British Empire—II. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 68–82.

      Current Events of Importance in Negro Education

      Hayes, H. C. (1933). The effect of the Depression upon educational activities among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 96–120.

      Volume 2Spring 1933Number 2

      Special Focus: Race Relations and the Education of Negroes

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1933). Race relations and the education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 121–127.

      Articles

      Reckless, W. C., & Bringen, H. L. (1933). Racial attitudes and information about the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 128–138.

      Alexander, W. W. (1933). Southern White schools study race questions. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 139–146.

      Weatherford, W. D. (1933). Changing attitudes of southern students. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 147–150.

      Carmichael, M. (1933). A program for “A better understanding between the races.” The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 151–156.

      Leavell, U. W. (1933). The program of dual education and racial adjustment at George Peabody College for teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 157–164.

      General Articles

      Knox, E. O. (1933). The Negro as a subject of university research. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 165–174.

      Reavis, W. C. (1933). A critical evaluation of the yearbook on the Negro elementary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 175–178.

      Brown, S. A. (1933). Negro character as seen by White authors. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 179–203.

      Volume 2Summer 1933Number 3

      Survey of Negro Higher Education Yearbook Number 2

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1933). Editorial Note. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 255–256.

      Articles

      Thompson, C. H. (1933). Introduction: The problem of Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 257–271.

      Lane, D. A., Jr. (1933). The junior college movement among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 272–283.

      Colson, E. M. (1933). The Negro teachers' college and normal school. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 284–298.

      Davis, E. P. (1933). The Negro liberal arts college. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 299–311.

      Davis, J. W. (1933). The Negro land-grant college. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 312–328.

      Frazier, E. F. (1933). Graduate education in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 329–341.

      Mays, B. E. (1933). The education of Negro ministers. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 342–351.

      Slowe, L. D. (1933). Higher education of Negro women. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 352–358.

      Caliver, A. (1933). Negro college students and the need of personnel work. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 359–378.

      McCuistion, F. (1933). The present status of higher education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 379–396.

      Moton, R. R. (1933). Negro higher and professional education in 1943. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 397–402.

      Davis, J. (1933). The outlook for the professional and higher education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 403–410.

      Miller, K. (1933). The past, present, and future of the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 411–422.

      Volume 2Fall 1933Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1933). Why a Class “B” Negro college? The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 427–431.

      Articles

      Caliver, A. (1933). The Negro teacher and a philosophy of Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 432–447.

      Dunlap, M. E. (1933). Recreational reading of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 448–459.

      Shores, L. (1933). A comparison of the reading interests of Negro and White college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 460–465.

      Posey, T. E. (1933). The socio-economic background of freshmen at West Virginia State College. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 466–476.

      Davis, T. E. (1933). A study of Fisk University freshmen from 1928 to 1930. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 477–483.

      Johnston, J. H. (1933). Graduates of northern high schools as students at a southern Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 484–486.

      Rivers, W. N., Jr. (1933). A study of the modern foreign languages in thirty Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 487–493.

      Swanson, C. G., & Holmes, M. G. (1933). The social and economic background of the Negro in a northern metropolitan suburb. The Journal of Negro Education, 2, 494–499.

      Volume 3Winter 1934Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1934). The education of subject and underprivileged peoples. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 1–4.

      Articles

      Ickes, H. L. (1934). The education of the Negro in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 5–7.

      Beale, H. K. (1934). The needs of Negro education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 8–19.

      Cook, K. M. (1934). Education among native and minority groups in Alaska, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and Hawaii. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 20–41.

      Lane, B. B. (1934). Education in the Virgin Islands. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 42–49.

      Embree, E. R. (1934). A new school in American Samoa. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 50–56.

      Parker, H. T. (1934). The Australian Aborigine. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 57–65.

      Work, F. E. (1934). A plan for Ethiopia's educational system. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 66–68.

      Bunche, R. J. (1934). French educational policy in Togo and Dahomey. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 69–97.

      Cook, P. A. W. (1934). The education of rural Bantu peoples in South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 98–104.

      Wallbank, T. W. (1934). The educational renaissance in British tropical Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 105–122.

      Faris, E. (1934). Native education in the Belgian Congo. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 123–130.

      Volume 3Spring 1934Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1934). Are there too many Negro colleges? The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 159–167.

      Articles

      Holmes, D. O. W. (1934). The beginnings of the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 168–193.

      Baker, P. E. (1934). Negro-White adjustment in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 194–204.

      Long, H. H. (1934). The intelligence of Colored elementary pupils in Washington, D.C. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 205–222.

      Knox, E. O. (1934). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1933. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 223–244.

      Clark, F. G. (1934). Administrative control of public Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 245–256.

      Butler, J. H. M. (1934). New education in the Philippines. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 257–268.

      Volume 3Summer 1934Number 3

      The Physical and Mental Abilities of the American Negro

      Yearbook Number 3

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1934). Editorial Note. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 317–318.

      Part 1: Introduction

      Garth, T. R. (1934). The problem of race psychology: A general statement. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 319–327.

      Johnson, C. S., & Bond, H. M. (1934). The investigation of racial differences prior to 1910. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 328–339.

      Part 2: A Critical Examination of Investigations Since 1910 A. Physical

      Cobb, W. M. (1934). The physical constitution of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 340–388.

      Herskovits, M. J. (1934). A critical discussion of the “Mulatto Hypothesis.” The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 389–402.

      B. Mental

      Peterson, J. (1934). Basic considerations of methodology in race testing. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 403–410.

      Daniel, R. P. (1934). Negro-White differences in nonintellectual traits, and in special aptitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 411–423.

      Price, J. S. C. (1934). Negro-White differences in general intelligence. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 424–452.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1934). Racial differences in scholastic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 453–477.

      Klineberg, O. (1934). Cultural factors in intelligence-test performance. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 478–483.

      Rosenthal, S. P. (1934). Racial differences in the incidence of mental disease. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 484–493.

      Part 3: The Present Status of the Problem

      Thompson, C. H. (1934). The conclusions of scientists relative to racial differences. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 494–512.

      Pintner, R. (1934). Intelligence differences between American Negroes and Whites. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 513–518.

      Freeman, F. N. (1934). The interpretation of test results with especial reference to race comparisons. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 519–522.

      Smith, C. E. (1934). A new approach to the problem of racial differences. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 523–529.

      Dearborn, W. F., & Long, H. H. (1934). The physical and mental abilities of the American Negro: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 530–547.

      Volume 3Fall 1934Number 4

      Special Focus: The Federal Government and Negro Education

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1934). The federal government and Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 565–572.

      Articles

      Roosevelt, F. D. [Mrs.]. (1934). The National Conference on the Education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 573–575.

      Ickes, H. L. (1934). Why a national conference on the education of Negroes? The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 576–578.

      Chapman, O. L. (1934). A national conference on the education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 579–580.

      Zook, G. F. (1934). The National Conference on Negro Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 581–585.

      General Articles

      MidKiff, F. E. (1934). Negro education and race relations in southern United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 586–592.

      Crooks, K. B. M. (1934). Entrance examinations for Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 593–597.

      Reedy, S. J. (1934). The Negro magazine: A critical study of its educational significance. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 598–604.

      McCormick, J. S. (1934). The Julius Rosenwald Fund. The Journal of Negro Education, 3, 605–626.

      Volume 4Winter 1935Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1935). The vocational guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 1–4.

      Editorial

      Johnson, C. S. (1935). The Negro college graduate: How and where he is employed. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 5–22.

      Hill, T. A. (1935). Educating and guiding Negro youth for occupational efficiency. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 23–31.

      Callis, H. A. (1935). The need and training of Negro physicians. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 32–41.

      Massey-Riddle, E. G. (1935). The training and placement of Negro nurses. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 42–48.

      Houston, C. H. (1935). The need for Negro lawyers. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 49–52.

      Fisher, M. M. (1935). Negroes as Christian ministers. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 53–59.

      Downing, L. K. (1935). The Negro in the professions of engineering and architecture. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 60–70.

      Edwards, P. K. (1935). The need for and education of Negro business men. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 71–75.

      Washington, F. B. (1935). The need and education of Negro social workers. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 76–93.

      Curtis, F. R. (1935). Librarianship as a field for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 94–98.

      Caliver, A. (1935). Some problems in the education and placement of Negro teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 99–112.

      Daniel, W. G. (1935). Current trends and events of national importance in Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 136–147.

      Volume 4Spring 1935Number 2

      Editorial Comments

      Thompson, C. H. (1935). School money in Black and White, part 1. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 149–153.

      Thompson, C. H. (1935). Investing in Negro brains: Coordination of national organizations, part 2. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 153–158.

      Editorial

      Bond, H. M. (1935). The curriculum and the Negro child. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 159–168.

      Bryant, I. B., Jr. (1935). News items about Negroes in White urban and rural newspapers. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 169–178.

      Rothschild, R. (1935). A Belgian's view of Negro schools in southern U.S.A. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 179–184.

      Jackson, R. E. (1935). The development and present status of secondary education for Negroes in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 185–191.

      Long, H. H. (1935). Test results of third-grade Negro children selected on the basis of socio-economic status, I. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 192–212.

      Knox, E. O. (1935). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1934. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 213–229.

      Wallbank, T. W. (1935). Achimota College and educational objectives in Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 230–245.

      Canady, H. G. (1935). Individual differences among freshmen at West Virginia State College. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 246–258.

      Volume 4Summer 1935Number 3

      The Courts and the Negro Separate School

      Yearbook Number 4

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1935). Editorial Note. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 289–292.

      Part 1. The Problem of the Negro Separate School

      Frazier, E. F. (1935). The status of the Negro in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 293–307.

      Bunche, R. J. (1935). A critical analysis of the tactics and programs of minority groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 308–320.

      Bond, H. M. (1935). The extent and character of separate schools in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 321–327.

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1935). Does the Negro need separate schools? The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 328–335.

      Long, H. H. (1935). Some psychogenic hazards of segregated education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 336–350.

      Part 2. The Negro Separate School as Defined by Legislation and Court Decisions

      Peterson, G. T. (1935). The present status of the Negro separate school as defined by court decisions. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 351–374.

      Hubbard, M. W., & Alexander, R. P. (1935). Types of potentially favorable court cases relative to the separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 375–405.

      Part 3. Should Negroes Resort to the Courts?—A Symposium

      Locke, A. (1935). The dilemma of segregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 406–411.

      Kilpatrick, W. H. (1935). Resort to courts by Negroes to improve their schools: A conditional alternative. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 412–418.

      Thompson, C. H. (1935). Court action the only reasonable alternative to remedy immediate abuses of the Negro separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 419–434.

      Williams, W. T. B. (1935). Court action by Negroes to improve their schools a doubtful remedy. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 435–441.

      Part 4. A General Critical Summary of the Yearbook

      Edwards, N. (1935). A critique: The courts and the Negro separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 442–455.

      Volume 4Fall 1935Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1935). The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 465–467.

      Editorial

      Kelly, F. J. (1935). An outsider's view of Howard University. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 468–475.

      Eells, W. C. (1935). Results of surveys of Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 476–481.

      Dunlap, M. E. (1935). Special collections of Negro literature in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 482–489.

      Baumgardner, H. W. (1935). Measuring Negro self-respect. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 490–499.

      Williams, L. V. (1935). The need for the development of creative abilities among Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 500–504.

      Jackson, R. E. (1935). Reorganized secondary schools for Negroes in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 505–513.

      Oldham, E. V. (1935). The socio-economic status and personality of Negro adolescent girls. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 514–522.

      Long, H. H. (1935). Test results of third grade Negro children selected on the basis of socio-economic status, II. The Journal of Negro Education, 4, 523–552.

      Volume 5Winter 1936Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1936). The National Conference on the Economic Crisis and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 1–2.

      Editorial

      Davis, J. P. (1936). A survey of the problems of the Negro under the New Deal. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 3–12.

      Haynes, G. E. (1936). The American Negro in the changing economic order. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 13–19.

      Stone, O. M. (1936). The present position of the Negro farm population: The bottom rung of the farm ladder. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 20–31.

      Campbell, J. P. (1936). The government's farm policies and the Negro farmer. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 32–39.

      Hill, T. A. (1936). The plight of the Negro industrial worker. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 40–47.

      Myers, A. H. (1936). The Negro worker under NRA [National Recovery Administration]. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 48–53.

      Randolph, A. P. (1936). The trade union movement and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 54–58.

      Bunche, R. J. (1936). A critique of New Deal social planning as it affects Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 59–65.

      Anderson, M. (1936). The plight of Negro domestic labor. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 66–72.

      Lewis, E. (1936). The Negro on relief. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 73–78.

      Hartwell, A. (1936). The need of social and unemployment insurance for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 79–87.

      Ford, J. W. (1936). The Communist's way out for the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 88–95.

      McKinney, E. R. (1936). The Workers Party's way out for the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 96–99.

      Thomas, N. (1936). The Socialist's way out for the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 100–104.

      Dorsey, E. E. (1936). The Negro and social planning. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 105–109.

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1936). Social planning for the Negro, past and present. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 110–125.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1936). The education of the Negro in 1935. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 150–162.

      Volume 5Spring 1936Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1936). The passing of John Hope. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 163–166.

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1936). Discussion of The University of Maryland v. Donald Gaines Murray. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 166–174.

      Editorial

      Jenkins, M. D. (1936). A socio-psychological study of Negro children of superior intelligence. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 175–190.

      Doyle, B. W. (1936). The etiquette of race relations—Past, present, and future. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 191–208.

      Canady, H. G. (1936). The effect of “rapport” on the I.Q.: A new approach to the problem of racial psychology. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 209–219.

      Moses, E. R. (1936). Community factors in Negro delinquency. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 220–227.

      Doran, A. T. (1936). Retardation among Negro pupils in the junior high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 228–231.

      Porter, D. B. (1936). Library sources for the study of Negro life and history. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 232–244.

      Eells, W. C. (1936). Surveys of higher education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 245–251.

      Knox, E. O. (1936). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1935, I. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 252–262.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1936). Current trends and events of national importance in Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 300–309.

      Volume 5Summer 1936Number 3

      Does Negro Education Need Re-Organization and Re-Direction?

      Yearbook Number 5

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1936). Does Negro education need re-organization and re-direction? The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 311–313.

      Part 1. Definition of the Problem

      Holmes, D. O. W. (1936). Does Negro education need reorganization and redirection?—A statement of the problem. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 314–323.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1936). A determination of the peculiar problems of Negroes in contemporary American society. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 324–350.

      Part 2. The Symposium

      Section A: General Reorganization and Redirection

      Bunche, R. J. (1936). Education in Black and White. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 351–358.

      Horne, F. S. (1936). “Dog House” education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 359–368.

      Lanier, R. O. (1936). Reorganization and redirection of Negro education in terms of articulation and integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 369–374.

      Johnson, C. S. (1936). On the need of realism in Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 375–382.

      Heningburg, A. (1936). What shall we challenge in the existing order? The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 383–392.

      Robinson, W. A. (1936). What peculiar organization and direction should characterize the education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 393–400.

      Aery, W. A. (1936). New emphases in the education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 401–406.

      Jones, T. J. (1936). Universality of educational objectives. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 407–411.

      Bousfield, M. B. (1936). Redirection of the education of Negroes in terms of social needs. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 412–419.

      Section B: Elementary and Rural Education

      Washington, A. H. (1936). The American problem of rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 420–429.

      Favrot, L. M. (1936). How the small rural school can more adequately serve its community. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 430–438.

      Embree, E. R. (1936). Education for rural life. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 439–447.

      Carney, M. (1936). Desirable rural adaptations in the education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 448–454.

      Leavell, U. W. (1936). Needed redirection of elementary education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 455–463.

      Section C: Higher Education

      Gallagher, B. G. (1936). Reorganize the college to discharge its social function. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 464–473.

      Clement, R. E. (1936). Redirection and reorganization of the college for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 474–478.

      Daniel, R. P. (1936). One consideration of redirection of emphasis of the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 479–483.

      Miller, K. (1936). The reorganization of the higher education of the Negro in light of changing conditions. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 484–494.

      Section D: Special Phases

      Patterson, F. D. (1936). Avenues of redirection in vocational education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 495–501.

      Newbold, N. C. (1936). More money for and more emphasis upon Negro education;—Not reorganization and redirection. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 502–507.

      Caliver, A. (1936). The role of the teacher in the reorganization and redirection of Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 508–516.

      Part 3. A Critical Summary of the Yearbook

      Judd, C. H. (1936). The reorganization and redirection of Negro education: A critical comment. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 517–520.

      Lane, D. A., Jr. (1936). Some major implications of the fifth yearbook of The Journal of Negro Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 521–526.

      Payne, E. G. (1936). The reorganization and redirection of Negro education: A critical analysis. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 527–530.

      Frazier, E. F. (1936). A critical summary of articles contributed to symposium on Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 531–533.

      Volume 5Fall 1936Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1936). Discrimination in Negro teachers' salaries in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 539–542.

      Editorial

      Scott, E. J. (1936). Twenty years after: An appraisal of Booker T. Washington. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 543–554.

      Porter, D. B. (1936). The organized educational activities of Negro literary societies, 1828–1846. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 555–576.

      Rothschild, R. (1936). Trends in native policy in the Belgian Congo. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 577–590.

      Ford, N. A. (1936). The Negro junior college. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 591–594.

      Eells, W. C. (1936). The center of population of Negro higher education, 1870–1930. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 595–598.

      Douglass, H. R., & Collins, J. H. (1936). The relationship of certain factors to failure among superior pupils in a junior high school for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 599–601.

      Jackson, R. E. (1936). A proposed revision of a two-year curriculum for training elementary teachers in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 602–611.

      Knox, E. O. (1936). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1935, II. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 612–625.

      Current Trends and Events in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1936). National conferences, and general progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 648–666.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1936). Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 666–670.

      Washington, A. H. (1936). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 671.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1936). The vocational and educational guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 5, 672–676.

      Volume 6Winter 1937Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1937). The Harrison-Fletcher Bill and Negro separate schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 1–6.

      Articles

      Hill, L. P. (1937). The future of our culture. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 7–16.

      Bond, H. M. (1937). The influence of personalities on the public education of Negroes in Alabama, I. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 17–29.

      Greene, H. W. (1937). Sixty years of doctorates conferred upon Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 30–37.

      Redcay, E. E. (1937). Pioneering in Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 38–53.

      McMorries, J. C. (1937). The interests of freshmen at Lincoln University. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 54–59.

      Cooper, C. L. (1937). The vocational choices of Negro college students in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 60–69.

      Current Trends and Events in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1937). Federal activities and Negro education, and general progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 101–105.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1937). Higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 105–114.

      Washington, A. H. (1937). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 115–125.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1937). The vocational and educational guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 125–128.

      Volume 6Spring 1937Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1937). The Harrison-Black-Fletcher Bill makes its debut. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 129–133.

      Editorial

      Mays, B. E. (1937). The color line around the world. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 134–143.

      Bond, J. M. (1937). The educational program for Negroes in the TVA [Tennessee Valley Authority]. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 144–151.

      Blanchard, F. Q. (1937). A quarter century in the American Missionary Association. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 152–156.

      Davis, T. E. (1937). Some racial attitudes of Negro college and grade school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 157–165.

      Knox, E. O. (1937). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1936. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 166–171.

      Bond, H. M. (1937). The influence of personalities on the public education of Negroes in Alabama, II. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 172–187.

      Callis, H. A. (1937). The Negro teacher and the A.F.T. [American Federation of Teachers]. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 188–190.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1937). National activities, and general progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 225–240.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1937). Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 240–248.

      Washington, A. H. (1937). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 249–257.

      Volume 6Summer 1937Number 3

      The Health Status, Health Facilities, and Health Education of Negroes in the United States

      Yearbook Number 6

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1937). The health status and health education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 261–262.

      Part 1: The Health Status of Negroes

      Parran, T. (1937). A general introductory statement of the problems of the health status and health education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 263–267.

      Dublin, L. I. (1937). The problem of Negro health as revealed by vital statistics. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 268–275.

      Gover, M. (1937). Trend of mortality among southern Negroes since 1920. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 276–288.

      Holmes, S. J. (1937). The principal causes of death among Negroes: A general comparative statement. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 289–302.

      Ornstein, G. G. (1937). The leading causes of death among Negroes: Tuberculosis. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 303–309.

      Hazen, H. H. (1937). A leading cause of death among Negroes: Syphilis. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 310–321.

      Tandy, E. C. (1937). Infant and maternal mortality among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 322–349.

      Perrott, G. S. J., & Holland, D. F. (1937). The need for adequate data on current illness among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 350–363.

      Jones, R. F., & Price, K. A. (1937). The incidence of gonorrhea among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 364–376.

      Williams, E. Y. (1937). The incidence of mental disease in the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 377–392.

      Smith, A. D. G., & Owens, N. A. (1937). The incidence of physical defects in Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 393–395.

      Callis, H. A. (1937). The incidence of physical defects in Negro adults. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 396–398.

      Poindexter, H. A. (1937). Special health problems of Negroes in rural areas. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 399–412.

      Tibbitts, C. (1937). The socio-economic background of Negro health status. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 413–428.

      Doull, J. A. (1937). Comparative racial immunity to diseases. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 429–437.

      Part 2: Health Facilities Available to Negroes

      Davis, M. M. (1937). Problems of health service for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 438–449.

      Smith, A. P. (1937). The availability of facilities for Negroes suffering from mental and nervous diseases. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 450–454.

      Scott, J. A. (1937). Educational facilities available for physically handicapped Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 455–467.

      Adams, N. P. G. (1937). Sources of supply of Negro health personnel: Physicians. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 468–476.

      Dixon, R. A. (1937). Sources of supply of Negro health personnel: Dentists. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 477–482.

      Riddle, E. M. (1937). Sources of supply of Negro health personnel: Nurses. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 483–492.

      Part 3: Health Education of Negroes

      West, J. B. (1937). The present character and extent of health education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 493–498.

      Bent, M. J. (1937). Health education programs of government agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 499–505.

      Lenroot, K. F. (1937). The health-education program of the Children's Bureau, with particular reference to Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 506–512.

      Bousfield, M. O. (1937). The Negro home and the health education program. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 513–518.

      Rogers, J. F. (1937). Health work in schools for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 519–522.

      Nathan, W. B. (1937). Health education in Negro public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 523–530.

      Cornely, P. B. (1937). Health education programs in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 531–537.

      Smith, S. L. (1937). Development of a health education program for Negro teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 538–547.

      Guild, C. S. C. (1937). A five-year study of tuberculosis among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 548–552.

      Brown, R. C. (1937). The National Negro Health Week movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 553–564.

      Barnwell, F. R. (1937). Health education of Negroes provided by press, radio, and theatre. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 565–571.

      Part 4: A Critical Summary of the Yearbook

      Wilbur, R. L. (1937). The health status and health education of Negroes in the United States: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 572–577.

      Part 5: Selected, Annotated Bibliography

      Allen, E. H., Jr. (1937). A selected annotated bibliography on the health education of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 578–587.

      Volume 6Fall 1937Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson C. H. (1937). A “New Deal” in the administration of Negro colleges? The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 589–591.

      Editorial

      Smith, M. (1937). A comparison of White and Indian student attitudes toward the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 592–595.

      Outland, G. E. (1937). Educational backgrounds of transient Negro boys. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 596–600.

      Peck, L., & Hodges, A. B. (1937). A study of the eidetic imagery of young Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 601–610.

      Meenes, M. (1937). The incidence of eidetic imagery in Negro school children. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 611–616.

      McCulloch, M. C. (1937). The function of the Negro cultural college. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 617–622.

      Connor, M. W. (1937). The facilities and practices of Negro tax-supported teacher-training institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 623–627.

      Simpson, G. E. (1937). Race relations and the Philadelphia press. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 628–630.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1937). National and state activities. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 661–672.

      Washington, A. H. (1937). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 672–683.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1937). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 6, 683–690.

      Volume 7Winter 1938Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1938). A neglected phase of vocational education among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 1–4.

      Editorial

      Holmes, D. O. W. (1938). The future possibilities of graduate work in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 5–11.

      Spingarn, A. B. (1938). Collecting a library of Negro literature. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 12–18.

      Oak, V. V. (1938). Evaluation of business curricula in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 19–31.

      Ferguson, E. A. (1938). Race consciousness among American Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 32–40.

      Gregg, H. D. (1938). Non-academic and academic interests of Negro high school students in mixed and separate schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 41–47.

      Holden, P. H. (1938). After-school careers of Negro high school graduates of Houston, Texas, 1933. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 48–54.

      Eberhardt, H. G. (1938). Individual differences in reading ability among college freshmen. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 55–59.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1938). Progress in state and nation. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 90–97.

      Washington, A. H. (1938). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 97–98.

      House, G. B. (1938). A cooperative adventure in rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 98–101.

      Ransom, L. A. (1938). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 102–104.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1938). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 104–108.

      Volume 7Spring 1938Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1938). The Report of the President's Advisory Committee on Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 109–117.

      Editorial

      Jenkins, M. D. (1938). Enrollment in Negro colleges and universities, 1937–38. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 118–123.

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1938). How Negroes have taken advantage of educational opportunities offered by friends. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 124–131.

      McAllister, J. E. (1938). A venture in rural-teacher education among Negroes in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 132–143.

      Scates, D. E. (1938). Cincinnati Colored teachers set a standard. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 144–146.

      Cook, M. (1938). The teaching of French in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 147–154.

      Matheus, J. F. (1938). A Negro state college looks at foreign language. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 155–159.

      McPheeters, A. A. (1938). The Department of Education in seventeen small Negro liberal arts colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 160–164.

      Canady, H. G. (1938). Psychology in Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 165–171.

      Knox, E. O. (1938). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1937. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 172–179.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1938). General activities. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 220–224.

      Washington, A. H. (1938). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 224–231.

      Ransom, L. A. (1938). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 232–237.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1938). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 237–239.

      Volume 7Summer 1938Number 3

      A Critical Study of Past, Present, and Future Relationships of the Federal Government

      Yearbook Number 7

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1938). The purpose and scope of the seventh yearbook. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 241–243.

      Part 1: Past Relations of the Federal Government to Education

      Russell, J. D. (1938). The evolution of the present relations of the federal government to education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 244–255.

      Cook, K. M. (1938). Federal relations to education in outlying parts. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 256–266.

      Beatty, W. W. (1938). The federal government and the education of Indians and Eskimos. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 267–272.

      Lane, D. A., Jr. (1938). The development of the present relationship of the federal government to Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 273–281.

      Part 2: Participation of Negro Separate Schools in Federal Education Grants

      Davis, J. W. (1938). The participation of Negro land-grant colleges in permanent federal education funds. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 282–291.

      Florence, C. W. (1938). The federally aided program of vocational teacher-training in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 292–302.

      Thompson, C. H. (1938). The federal program of vocational education in Negro schools of less than college grade. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 303–318.

      Wilkerson, D. A., & Penn, L. A. (1938). The participation of Negroes in the federally aided program of civilian vocational rehabilitation. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 319–330.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1938). The participation of Negroes in the federally aided program of agricultural and home economics extension. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 331–344.

      Atkins, J. A. (1938). The participation of Negroes in pre-school and adult education programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 345–356.

      Daniel, W. G., & Miller, C. L. (1938). The participation of the Negro in the National Youth Administration Program. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 357–365.

      Weaver, R. C. (1938). The Public Works Administration School Building-Aid Program and separate Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 366–374.

      Oxley, H. W. (1938). The Civilian Conservation Corps and the education of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 375–382.

      Bond, J. M. (1938). The training program of the Tennessee Valley Authority. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 383–389.

      Long, H. H. (1938). The support and control of public education in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 390–399.

      Reid, C. F. (1938). Federal support and control of education in the territories and outlying possessions. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 400–412.

      Knox, E. O. (1938). Federal support of special institutions—Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Howard University. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 413–422.

      Phillips, M. R. (1938). The special educational programs of the several departments of the federal government. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 423–431.

      Part 3: Future Policies and Practices

      Johnson, G. (1938). New and/or enlarged conceptions of the relationship of the federal government to education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 432–436.

      Ryan, W. C. (1938). New and enlarged conceptions of the relationship of the federal government to education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 437–442.

      Givens, W. E. (1938). New and enlarged conceptions of the relationship of the federal government to education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 443–449.

      Grossman, M. F. (1938). Redefining the relationship of the federal government to the education of racial and other minority groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 450–453.

      Bond, H. M. (1938). Redefining the relationship of the federal government to the education of racial and other minority groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 454–459.

      Houston, C. H. (1938). Future policies and practices which should govern the relationship of the federal government to Negro separate schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 460–462.

      Part 4: Critical Summary of the Yearbook

      Klein, A. J. (1938). The federal government and Negro education: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 463–467.

      Part 5: Selected Annotated Bibliography

      Phillips, M. R., & Miller, C. L. (1938). A selected annotated bibliography on the relationship of the federal government to Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 468–474.

      Volume 7Fall 1938Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Holmes, D. O. W. (1938). Twenty-five years of Thomas Jesse Jones and the Phelps-Stokes Fund. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 475–480.

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1938). White and Negro teachers' salaries and cost of living. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 480–485.

      Editorial

      Weaver, R. C. (1938). Training Negroes for occupational opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 486–497.

      Fitchett, E. H. (1938). The occupational preferences and opportunities for Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 498–513.

      Harris, N. H. (1938). The cost of instruction for Negroes in the public high schools of North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 514–520.

      Wallbank, T. W. (1938). British colonial policy and native education in Kenya. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 521–532.

      Watson, J. B. (1938). The Negro graduate school? The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 533–534.

      McMorries, J. C. (1938). A study of new students admitted by a Negro college in 1936. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 535–539.

      Jackson, R. E. (1938). Rise of teacher-training for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 540–547.

      Evans, J. W. (1938). A brief sketch of the development of Negro education in St. Louis, Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 548–552.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1938). Organizational and institutional programs in 1938. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 582–587.

      Washington, A. H. (1938). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 587–596.

      Ransom, L. A. (1938). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 597–599.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1938). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 7, 599–608.

      Volume 8Winter 1939Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1939). Eight years of rating of Negro schools and colleges by the Southern Association: An evaluation. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 1–8.

      Editorial

      McMillan, L. K. (1939). Negro higher education as I have known it. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 9–18.

      Crooks, K. B. M. (1939). Is Negro education failing? The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 19–25.

      Harvey, O. L. (1939). Negro representation in public school enrollments. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 26–30.

      Bartholomew, R. L., & Walton, S. (1939). The Paine College children's library. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 31–33.

      Chivers, W. R. (1939). Northward migration and the health of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 34–43.

      Stewart, W. W. (1939). Factors affecting the education of Negroes in rural communities in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 44–49.

      Haynes, G. E. (1939). Negro technicians in American progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 50–57.

      Ellis, A. W. (1939). The status of health and physical education for women in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 58–63.

      Smith, M. (1939). A study of change of attitudes toward the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 64–70.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1939). Organizational and institutional programs in 1938. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 102–104.

      Washington, A. H. (1939). Rural education—The cooperative movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 104–111.

      Ransom, L. A. (1939). Education and the law: Gaines v. The University of Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 111–117.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1939). Vocational education and guidance of Negroes: A measure of the economic value of vocational education. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 118–120.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1939). Current trends in higher education: Democratic government in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 121–129.

      Volume 8Spring 1939Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1939). The Missouri decision and the future of Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 131–141.

      Editorial

      Clement, R. E. (1939). Legal provisions for graduate and professional instruction for Negroes in states operating separate school systems. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 142–149.

      McGuinn, H. J. (1939). The courts and equality of educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 150–163.

      Brewton, J. E. (1939). The status of supervision of schools for Negroes in the southeastern states. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 164–169.

      Mills, C. H. (1939). Selective annotated bibliography on the Negro and foreign languages. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 170–176.

      Reedy, S. J. (1939). English composition again. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 177–185.

      Davenport, R. K. (1939). A background study of a Negro college freshman population. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 186–197.

      Knox, E. O. (1939). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1938. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 198–204.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1939). General activities. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 235–237.

      Washington, A. H. (1939). Rural education—the cooperative movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 238–240.

      Williamson, A. O. H. (1939). The cooperative way out: A challenge to the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 240–243.

      Ransom, L. A. (1939). Education and the law: Aftermath of the Gaines Decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 244–246.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1939). Higher education: Enrollment in Negro colleges and universities, 1938–39. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 247–253.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1939). Vocational education and guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 254–259.

      Thompson, C. H. (1939). Special: Marian Anderson sings to 75,000 at the Lincoln

      Memorial. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 260.

      Volume 8Summer 1939Number 3

      The Present and Future Position of the Negro in the American Social Order

      Yearbook Number 8

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1939). The present and future position of the Negro in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 261–263.

      Part 1. The Negro as a Racial Minority Group in the American Social Order

      Davis, A. (1939). The socialization of the American Negro child and adolescent. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 264–274.

      Brown, S. A. (1939). The American race problem as reflected in American literature. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 275–290.

      Reuter, E. B. (1939). Why the presence of the Negro constitutes a problem in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 291–298.

      Roucek, J. S., & Brown, F. J. (1939). The problem of the Negro and European immigrant minorities: Some comparisons and contrasts. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 299–312.

      Seiferth, W. S. (1939). The problem of racial and minority groups in America as seen by Europeans. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 313–322.

      Johnson, C. S. (1939). The present status of race relations, with particular reference to the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 323–335.

      Part 2. The Present Status of the Negro in the American Social Order

      Cobb, W. M. (1939). The Negro as a biological element in the American population. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 336–348.

      Brown, W. O. (1939). Race prejudice as a factor in the status of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 349–358.

      Cornely, P. B., & Alexander, V. M. (1939). The health status of the Negro in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 359–375.

      Frazier, E. F. (1939). The present status of the Negro family in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 376–382.

      Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1939). Disabilities affecting suffrage among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 383–394.

      Ransom, L. A. (1939). Legal status of Negro education under separate school systems. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 395–405.

      Ming, W. R. (1939). Disabilities affecting Negroes as to carrier accommodations, property, and judicial proceedings. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 406–415.

      Butler, G. O. (1939). The Black worker in industry, agriculture, domestic and personal service. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 416–429.

      Lewis, H. G. (1939). The Negro business, professional, and white collar worker. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 430–445.

      Lewis, E. E. (1939). The economic position of the American Negro: A brief summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 446–448.

      Wesley, C. H. (1939). Organized labor and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 449–461.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1939). The vocational education, guidance, and placement of Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 462–488.

      Thompson, C. H. (1939). The status of education of and for the American Negro in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 489–510.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1939). The mental ability of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 511–520.

      Locke, A. (1939). The Negro's contribution to American culture. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 521–529.

      Mays, B. E. (1939). The American Negro and the Christian religion. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 530–538.

      Bunche, R. J. (1939). The programs of organizations devoted to the improvement of the status of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 539–550.

      Part 3. The Position of the Negro in the American Social Order in 1950

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1939). The position of the Negro in the American social order: Where do we go from here? The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 551–570.

      Gallagher, B. G. (1939). What would constitute progress? The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 571–582.

      Bond, H. M. (1939). The position of the Negro in the American social order in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 583–586.

      Odum, H. W. (1939). The position of the Negro in the American social order in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 587–594.

      Hastie, W. H. (1939). The position of the Negro in the American social order: Outlook for 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 595–602.

      Long, H. H. (1939). The position of the Negro in the American social order: A forecast. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 603–616.

      Volume 8Fall 1939Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1939). The U.S. Office of Education survey of Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 617–619.

      Editorial

      Holmes, D. O. W. (1939). The Negro chooses democracy. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 620–633.

      Lovell, J., Jr. (1939). The social implications of the Negro spiritual. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 634–643.

      Woodson, H. W. (1939). A survey of chemistry curricula in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 644–648.

      Carroll, J. C. (1939). The beginnings of public education for Negroes in Indiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 649–658.

      Atwood, R. B. (1939). Financing schools for Negro children from state school funds in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 659–665.

      Klingberg, F. J. (1939). Philip Quaque: Pioneer native missionary on the Gold Coast, 1765–1816. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 666–672.

      Cook, M. (1939). The race problem in Paris and the French West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 673–680.

      Stokes, M. S. (1939). The education of Negro children living in Emporia. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 681–687.

      Pell, C. (1939). Anthropological differences between Whites and Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 688–693.

      Gray, W. H., Jr. (1939). The growth and decline of private secondary schools in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 8, 694–701.

      World War II and Post-War Years (1940–1949)
      Volume 9Winter 1940Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1940). Progress in the elimination of discrimination in White and Negro teachers' salaries. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 1–4.

      Editorial

      Chivers, W. R. (1940). Religion in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 5–12.

      Fraser, T. P. (1940). Science surveys in accredited Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 13–21.

      Cox, O. C. (1940). Provisions for graduate education among Negroes and prospects of a new system. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 22–31.

      Parker, J. W. (1940). Current debate practices in thirty Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 32–38.

      Jones, W. H. (1940). Some theories regarding the education of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 39–43.

      Harris, N. H. (1940). In-service teacher training facilities of North Carolina Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 44–50.

      Smith, S. L. (1940). The passing of the Hampton Library School. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 51–58.

      Jackson, R. E. (1940). An evaluation of educational opportunities for the Negro adolescent in Alabama, I. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 59–72.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G., & Miller, C. L. (1940). National activities and general progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 99–104.

      Washington, A. H. (1940). Rural education: An educational program for the Southeast Cultural Region of the United States; the 1939 Rural Institute at Atlanta, Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 105.

      Lee, H. F. (1940). A democratic educational program for a socially backward cultural region. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 105–112.

      Bullock, B. F. (1940). The 1939 Rural Institute. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 112–114.

      Ransom, L. A. (1940). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 114–123.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1940). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes: Some educational implications of the survey of white-collar and skilled Negro workers. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 123–130.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1940). Higher education: The cost of attending Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 130–137.

      Volume 9Spring 1940Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1940). The educational and administrative reorganization of Hampton Institute. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 139–143.

      Editorial

      McMillan, L. K. (1940). The Negro forty-ninth state in the light of the Jewish national home. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 144–153.

      Derbigny, I. A. (1940). Selective college admission in the lower South. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 154–161.

      Badger, H. G. (1940). Finances of Negro colleges, 1929–30 to 1938–39. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 162–166.

      Parker, J. W. (1940). Problems incident to the higher education of Negroes in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 167–176.

      Blanton, R. J. (1940). The future of higher education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 177–182.

      Punke, H. H. (1940). Social democracy through vocational education. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 183–187.

      Knox, E. O. (1940). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1939. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 188–199.

      Jackson, R. E. (1940). An evaluation of educational opportunities for the Negro adolescent in Alabama, II. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 200–207.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G., & Miller, C. L. (1940). National activities and general progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 239–242.

      Washington, A. H. (1940). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 243–249.

      Earley, A. (1940). Education in rural Delaware. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 249–255.

      Ransom, L. A. (1940). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 255–259.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1940). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 259–266.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1940). Higher education: Enrollment in Negro colleges and universities, 1939–1940. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 266–273.

      Volume 9Summer 1940Number 3

      A Critical Survey of Secondary Education for Negroes

      Yearbook Number 9

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1940). The Negro adolescent and his education. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 275–277.

      Part 1. The Negro Adolescent: His Problems and His Needs

      Reid, I. D. A. (1940). General characteristics of the Negro youth population. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 278–289.

      Frazier, E. F. (1940). The Negro family and Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 290–299.

      Alexander, V. M. (1940). The health status and needs of the Negro adolescent. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 300–310.

      Diggs, M. H. (1940). The problems and needs of Negro youth as revealed by delinquency and crime statistics. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 311–320.

      Granger, L. B. (1940). Problems and needs of Negro adolescent workers. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 321–331.

      Mays, B. E. (1940). The religious life and needs of Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 332–343.

      Johnson, C. S. (1940). The problems and needs of the Negro adolescent in view of his minority racial status: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 344–353.

      Part 2. Non-school Agencies for the Education of Negro Youth

      Johnson, C. C. (1940). Negro youth and the educational program of the Y.M.C.A. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 354–362.

      Cuthbert, M. (1940). Negro youth and the educational program of the Y.W.C.A. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 363–371.

      Harris, S. A. (1940). Negro youth and scouting, a character education program. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 372–378.

      Lovell, J., Jr. (1940). Youth programs of Negro improvement groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 379–387.

      Carrington, W. E. (1940). Negro youth and the religious education program of the church. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 388–396.

      Wright, M. T. (1940). Negro youth and the federal emergency programs: CCC [Civilian Conservation Corps] and NYA [National Youth Administration]. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 397–407.

      Simmons, S. B. (1940). Negro youth and the U.S. Junior Employment Service—4-H Clubs and the New Farmers of America. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 408–415.

      Henderson, E. B. (1940). The participation of Negro youth in community and educational programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 416–424.

      Logan, R. W. (1940). Negro youth and the influence of the press, radio, and cinema. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 425–434.

      Cook, L. A. (1940). Informal and non-school agencies for the education of Negro youth: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 435–439.

      Part 3. The Negro Secondary School

      Knox, E. O. (1940). A historical sketch of secondary education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 440–453.

      Long, H. H. (1940). The Negro secondary school population. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 454–464.

      Daniel, W. G. (1940). The aims of secondary education and the adequacy of the curriculum of the Negro secondary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 465–473.

      Robinson, W. A. (1940). Some problems in the administration, support, and accreditation of Negro secondary schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 474–481.

      Phillips, M. R. (1940). The Negro secondary school teacher. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 482–497.

      Davis, T. E. (1940). Vocational education and guidance in the Negro secondary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 498–503.

      Smith, S. L. (1940). Library facilities in Negro secondary schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 504–512.

      Washington, A. H. (1940). Negro secondary education in rural areas. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 513–524.

      Elder, A. (1940). The articulation of the Negro elementary and secondary school and college. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 525–533.

      Douglass, H. R. (1940). The education of Negro youth for modern America: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 534–546.

      Volume 9Fall 1940Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1940). The American Negro and the national defense. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 547–552.

      Editorial

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1940). The future of Wilberforce University. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 553–570.

      Bunche, R. J. (1940). The role of the university in the political orientation of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 571–579.

      Clark, E. R. (1940). Music education in Negro schools and colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 580–590.

      Farmer, H. E. (1940). The revival of classical learning as the most potent force in Negro progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 591–594.

      Preston, E. D., Jr. (1940). The development of Negro education in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 595–603.

      Taylor, W. S. (1940). Some observations of marginal man in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 604–609.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Miller, C. L. (1940). General activities. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 636–649.

      Washington, A. H. (1940). Rural education “Marches On” in the Americas. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 649–650.

      Williamson, A. O. H. (1940). Housing as a vital factor in rural Negro rehabilitation. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 650–657.

      Ferguson, E., Jr. (1940). Higher education: Charles Henry Turner and his contributions. The Journal of Negro Education, 9, 657–660.

      Volume 10Winter 1941Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1941). The tenth Volume of The Journal of Negro Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 1–23.

      Editorial

      Spaulding, F. T. (1941). Some special problems in the secondary education of Negroes: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 24–33.

      McCulloch, M. C. (1941). Beyond racialism. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 34–38.

      Cox, O. C. (1941). Employment, education, and marriage of young Negro adults. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 39–42.

      Bryant, G. E. (1941). Recent trends in racial attitudes of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 43–50.

      Clarke, D. P. (1941). The role of psychology in race survival. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 51–53.

      Mason, C. T., & Wilkins, T. B. (1941). Entrance examinations and success in college. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 54–58.

      Cook, W. W., & Hartshorn, H. H. (1941). Success of Lincoln University (Mo.) graduates in graduate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 59–62.

      Gray, W. H., Jr. (1941). The present status of Negro teachers in Iberia and Jackson Parishes, Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 63–67.

      Wesley, C. H. (1941). Education for citizenship in a democracy. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 68–78.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Miller, C. L. (1941). National activities and general progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 108–113.

      Washington, A. H. (1941). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 113–120.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1941). The vocational guidance and education of Negroes: The training and employment of Negroes in national defense industries. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 121–132.

      Ransom, L. A. (1941). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 132–138.

      Volume 10Spring 1941Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1941). Rank, tenure, and retirement of teachers in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 139–150.

      Editorial

      Cornely, P. B. (1941). The status of student health programs in Negro colleges in 1938–39. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 151–167.

      Williams, R. K. (1941). A study of personnel programs in eleven accredited Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 168–177.

      Davenport, R. K. (1941). A Negro college examines its curricula by measuring improvement in reading. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 178–184.

      Farmer, H. E. (1941). Informal post-graduate education of college-bred Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 185–189.

      Watts, F. P. (1941). A comparative clinical study of delinquent and non-delinquent Negro boys. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 190–207.

      Loop, A. S. (1941). Does educational background influence the careers of Negroes? The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 208–222.

      McDougald, E. (1941). Negro youth plans its future. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 223–229.

      Clarke, D. P. (1941). Stanford-Binet Scale “L” response patterns in matched racial groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 230–238.

      Moses, E. R. (1941). Indices of inequalities in a dual system of education. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 239–244.

      Knox, E. O. (1941). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1940. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 245–257.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Miller, C. L. (1941). General activities: Trends in Negro education from 1930–1939 and prospects for the 1940s. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 280–293.

      Washington, A. H. (1941). Rural education: The “Workshop” in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 293–299.

      Ransom, L. A. (1941). Education and the law: A new deal? The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 300–303.

      Volume 10Summer 1941Number 3

      Racial Minorities and the Present International Crisis

      Yearbook Number 10

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1941). Racial minorities and the present international crisis. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 305–308.

      Part 1: The Crisis of Present-Day Democracy

      Merriam, C. E. (1941). The meaning of democracy. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 309–317.

      Knight, F. H. (1941). The meaning of democracy: Its politico-economic structure and ideals. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 318–332.

      Hugh-Jones, E. M. (1941). The crisis of democracy in the British Empire. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 333–343.

      Logan, R. W. (1941). The crisis of democracy in the western hemisphere. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 344–352.

      Herz, J. H. (1941). Alternative proposals to democracy: Nazism. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 353–367.

      Stern, B. J. (1941). Alternative proposals to democracy: The pattern of fascism. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 368–379.

      Part 2: Immediate and Long-Range Prospects and Consequences of the Present Crisis

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1941). Neuropa: Hitler's new world order. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 380–386.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1941). Russia's proposed new world order of socialism. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 387–419.

      Wirth, L. (1941). Is a Hitler defeat essential to the preservation of democracy in the western hemisphere? The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 420–425.

      Elliott, W. Y. (1941). Will a British victory achieve a democratic world order? The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 426–434.

      Hutchins, R. M. (1941). America and the war. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 435–441.

      Gallagher, B. G. (1941). The dilemma of America in the defense of democracy. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 442–452.

      Part 3: The Stake of the Negro and Other Minorities in the Present World Crisis

      Embree, E. R. (1941). The status of minorities as a test of democracy. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 453–458.

      Brown, W. O. (1941). The present international crisis and the status of the African native. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 459–465.

      Seiferth, W. S. (1941). Abstract of a history of the Jews in Europe. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 466–478.

      Strong, S. M. (1941). The future of the Jewish populations of Europe. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 479–492.

      Sanchez, L. A. (1941). On the problem of the Indian in South America. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 493–503.

      Hanke, L. (1941). The incorporation of Indians and Negroes into Latin American life. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 504–509.

      Freyre, G. (1941). Brazil and the international crisis. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 510–514.

      Ramos, A. (1941). The Negro in Brazil. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 515–523.

      Reid, I. D. A. (1941). The Negro in the British West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 524–535.

      Williams, E. (1941). The impact of the international crisis upon the Negro in the Caribbean. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 536–544.

      Lesser, A. (1941). Anti-Semitism in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 545–556.

      Meenes, M. (1941). American Jews and Anti-Semitism. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 557–566.

      Bunche, R. J. (1941). The Negro in the political life of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 567–584.

      Johnson, C. S. (1941). The Negro and the present crisis. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 585–595.

      Johnson, G. G. (1941). The impact of war upon the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 596–611.

      Part 4: Critical Summary: The Educational Implications of the Present International Crisis

      Hart, J. K. (1941). The general educational implications of the present international crisis. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 612–616.

      Bond, H. M. (1941). The educational and other social implications of the impact of the present crisis upon racial minorities. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 617–622.

      Volume 10Fall 1941Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1941). The American Negro and the national defense, II. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 623–630.

      Editorial

      Mason, C. T., & Wilkins, T. B. (1941). Entrance examinations and success in college: A follow-up study. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 631–634.

      Miller, E. I. (1941). Library service for Negroes in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 635–642.

      Leidecker, K. F. (1941). The education of Negroes in St. Louis, Missouri, during William Torrey Harris' administration. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 643–649.

      Tanser, H. A. (1941). Intelligence of Negroes of mixed blood in Canada. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 650–652.

      Derbigny, I. A. (1941). Vocational orientation among Tuskegee Institute freshmen. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 653–660.

      Sanders, K. B., & Love, L. L. (1941). Causes of failures of Negro students in a northern university. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 661–663.

      Brunschwig, L. (1941). Opportunities for Negroes in the field of psychology. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 664–676.

      Ferguson, E., Jr. (1941). Relationship between courses in high school biology and general science and the grades of students in first quarter college biology. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 677–679.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Washington, A. H. (1941). Rural education: The workshop in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 702.

      Whiting, H. A. (1941). Curriculum-planning for Georgia Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 702–711.

      Ransom, L. A. (1941). Education and the law: National legislation. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 712–718.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1941). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1940–1941. The Journal of Negro Education, 10, 718–725.

      Volume 11Winter 1942Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1942). Negro morale and World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Canady, H. G., Buxton, C., & Gilliland, A. R. (1942). A scale for the measurement of the social environment of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 4–13.

      Branson, H. (1942). Microfilm in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 14–17.

      Gray, W. H., Jr. (1942). Trends in the control of private Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 18–28.

      Strong, H. H. (1942). Qualitative aspects of Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 29–38.

      Fitchett, E. H. (1942). The relation of income to adequate educational opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 39–46.

      Weaver, R. C. (1942). Federal aid, local control, and Negro participation. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 47–59.

      Harris, N. H. (1942). Honor societies in Negro four-year colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 60–63.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1942). Educational organizations and conferences for 1941. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 92–94.

      Washington, A. H., & Kirkland, M. W. (1942). The contributions of home economics education to rural society. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 94–100.

      Ransom, L. A. (1942). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 100–103.

      Volume 11Spring 1942Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1942). The role of race relations in World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 105–112.

      Editorial

      Turner, J. A. (1942). Dental health conditions in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 113–120.

      Ford, R. N. (1942). Some major problems in the quantification of social attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 121–134.

      Good, C. V. (1942). Some problems of historical criticism and historical writing. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 135–149.

      Bayton, J. A. (1942). The psychology of racial morale. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 150–153.

      Hawkins, T. E. (1942). Some factors which made for occupational maladjustment among 38 Negro freshmen. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 154–157.

      Allen, M. E. (1942). A comparative study of Negro and White children on melodic and harmonic sensitivity. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 158–164.

      Holland, J. H. (1942). The role of the Negro church as an organ of protest. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 165–169.

      Knox, E. O. (1942). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1941. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 170–184.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1942). Selected general trends, 1932–1942. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 209–211.

      Washington, A. H. (1942). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 212–217.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1942). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1941–1942. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 217–223.

      Ransom, L. A. (1942). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 224–228.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1942). The vocational education and guidance of Negroes: The Negro and the battle of production. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 228–239.

      Volume 11Summer 1942Number 3

      Negro Higher Education and the War

      Yearbook Number 11

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1942). Negro higher education and the war. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 241–246.

      Part 1: The General Role of Higher Education in the War and Post-War Reconstruction

      Gideonse, H. D. (1942). The function of higher education in the present war crisis. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 247–256.

      Wilkins, E. H. (1942). The contribution of the liberal arts college to the war program. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 257–261.

      McAfee, M. H. (1942). The war and the higher education of women. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 262–266.

      Good, C. V. (1942). The social crisis and reconstruction in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 267–273.

      Zook, G. F. (1942). The role of higher education in post-war reconstruction. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 274–278.

      Part 2: Negro Higher Education and the War

      Clark, F. G. (1942). Negro higher education and some fundamental issues raised by World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 279–291.

      Davis, J. W. (1942). Current changes in Negro higher education to meet the immediate war emergency. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 292–296.

      Branson, H. (1942). The role of the Negro college in the preparation of technical personnel for the war effort. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 297–303.

      Evans, J. C. (1942). The contribution of Negro higher education to the war effort. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 304–313.

      Patterson, F. D. (1942). Negro higher education's contribution to the war effort from the point of view of agriculture. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 314–321.

      Golightly, C. L. (1942). Negro higher education and democratic Negro morale. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 322–328.

      Jones, D. D. (1942). The war and the higher education of Negro women. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 329–337.

      MacLean, M. S. (1942). The impact of World War II upon institutions for the higher education of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 338–345.

      Gallagher, B. G. (1942). The impact of the war upon privately controlled Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 346–358.

      Daniel, R. P. (1942). The impact of the war upon the church-related college and university. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 359–364.

      Clement, R. E. (1942). The impact of the war upon Negro graduate and professional schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 365–374.

      Part 3: Negro Higher Education and Post-War Reconstruction

      Brown, I. C. (1942). The national survey of Negro higher education and post-war reconstruction: The place of the Negro college in Negro life. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 375–381.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1942). The national survey of Negro higher education post-war reconstruction: The resources of Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 382–390.

      Atwood, R. B. (1942). The role of Negro higher education in post-war reconstruction: The Negro land grant college. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 391–399.

      Mays, B. E. (1942). The role of the Negro liberal arts college in post-war reconstruction. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 400–411.

      Trenholm, H. C. (1942). The role of the Negro teachers college in post-war reconstruction. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 412–422.

      Wesley, C. H. (1942). The outlook for the graduate and professional education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 423–434.

      Volume 11Fall 1942Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1942). India: A crucial test of the war and peace aims of the United Nations. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 435–443.

      Editorial

      Buck, P. S. (1942). Breaking the barriers of race prejudice. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 444–453.

      Thompson, C. H. (1942). The basis of Negro morale in World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 454–464.

      Johnson, C. S. (1942). The Negro in post-war reconstruction: His hopes, fears and possibilities. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 465–470.

      McCulloch, M. C. (1942). Crisis in college study of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 471–475.

      Boone, W. H. (1942). Problems of adjustment of Negro students at a White school. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 476–483.

      Hargrave, E. (1942). How I feel as a Negro at a White college. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 484–486.

      Boynton, P. L., & Mayo, G. D. (1942). A comparison of certain attitudinal responses of White and Negro high school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 487–494.

      Brawley, J. P. (1942). Social attitudes and philosophies affecting public education in the dual system of Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 495–506.

      Wilkins, T. B. (1942). Late afternoon and evening classes in colleges for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 507–516.

      Jackson, R. E. (1942). A basic program for the education of Negro secondary-school teachers in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 517–526.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1942). Negro welfare and Mabel Carney at Teachers College, Columbia University. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 560–562.

      Washington, A. H. (1942). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 563–564.

      Baker, L. (1942). Workshop in teachers' educational qualifications. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 564–568.

      Ransom, L. A. (1942). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 568–570.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1942). The Negro college fights for democracy: The Negro college versus the United States Navy. The Journal of Negro Education, 11, 570–574.

      Volume 12Winter 1943Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1943). The war and Negro higher education in 1942. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 1–6.

      Editorial

      Davis, A. P. (1943). The Negro student and world revolution. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 7–13.

      Porter, H. L. (1943). Negro women's opportunities for training and service in the field of dietetics. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 14–20.

      Porter, R. P. (1943). Negro women in the clothing, cigar, and laundry industries of Philadelphia, 1940. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 21–23.

      Martin, W. H. (1943). A study of local initiative in the education of Negro teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 24–30.

      Turner, B. A. (1943). Some problems affecting industrial education in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 31–41.

      Fitchett, E. H. (1943). The role of Claflin College in Negro life in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 42–68.

      Holmes, J. B. (1943). A study of racial attitudes found in four colleges, including a scale to measure these attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 69–75.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Daniel, W. G. (1943). Negro education progressed in 1942. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 107–111.

      Washington, A. H. (1943). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 111.

      McAllister, J. E. (1943). Jackson College (Mississippi) plans for the rural teacher. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 111–120.

      Brown, W. H. (1943). Report of two years of activity of the secondary school study. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 121–130.

      Abraham, A. A. (1943). Sick leave policies in Negro land grant colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 130–133.

      Johnson, C. S. (1943). Southern Race Relations Conference. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 133–139.

      Volume 12Spring 1943Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1943). Mr. Dabney and the “Precipice.” The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 141–143.

      Editorial

      Cox, O. C. (1943). Race relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 144–153.

      McCulloch, M. C. (1943). The Negro studies himself: A thumbnail sketch of contrast. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 154–158.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1943). Case studies of Negro children of Binet IQ 160 and above. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 159–166.

      Canady, H. G. (1943). A study of sex differences in intelligence-test scores among 1,306 Negro college freshmen. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 167–172.

      Gillum, R. H. (1943). The Negro folksong in the American culture. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 173–180.

      Robinson, A. M., & Allen, F. W. (1943). Community service of a Negro college library. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 181–188.

      Preston, E. D., Jr. (1943). The development of Negro education in the District of Columbia, 1800–1860. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 189–198.

      Knox, E. O. (1943). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1942. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 199–210.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Anderson, M. M. (1943). Warren Brown attacks the Negro press. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 239–241.

      Washington, A. H. (1943). Rural education and the war. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 241–246.

      Jenkins, M. D., & Ware, C. F. (1943). Higher education—information and suggestions from government agencies on a wartime college program for women. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 246–250.

      Ransom, L. A. (1943). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 250–253.

      Himler, L. E., & Middleton, A. B. (1943). Mental hygiene in Negro colleges of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 253–256.

      Whiting, A. N. (1943). The campus spreads. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 256–259.

      Greene, H. W. (1943). An adventure in cooperative teaching. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 259–261.

      Volume 12Summer 1943Number 3

      The American Negro in World War I and World War II

      Yearbook Number 12

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1943). The American Negro in World War I and World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 263–267.

      Part 1. The Negro in the U.S. Armed Forces in World Wars I and II

      Bond, H. M. (1943). The Negro in the armed forces of the United States prior to World War I. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 268–287.

      Scott, E. J. (1943). The participation of Negroes in World War I: An introductory statement. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 288–297.

      Johnson, C. C. (1943). The mobilization of Negro manpower for the armed forces. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 298–306.

      Long, H. H. (1943). The Negro soldier in the army of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 307–315.

      Hastie, W. H. (1943). Negro officers in two world wars. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 316–323.

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1943). The Negro soldier in service abroad during the first world war. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 324–334.

      Garvin, C. H. (1943). The Negro in the special services of the U.S. Army: Medical corps, dental corps, and nurses corps. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 335–344.

      Davis, J. W. (1943). The Negro in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 345–349.

      White, W. (1943). Race relations in the armed services of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 350–354.

      Prattis, P. L. (1943). The morale of the Negro in the armed services of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 355–363.

      Houston, C. H. (1943). Critical summary: The Negro in the U.S. Armed Forces in World Wars I and II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 364–366.

      Part 2. The Negro on the Home Front in World Wars I and II

      Roberts, T. N. (1943). The Negro in government war agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 367–375.

      Branson, H. (1943). The training of Negroes for war industries in World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 376–385.

      Weaver, R. C. (1943). The employment of the Negro in war industries. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 386–396.

      Hubert, G. A. (1943). The Negro on the agricultural front. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 397–404.

      Ransom, L. A. (1943). Combating discrimination in the employment of Negroes in war industries and government agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 405–416.

      Clark, K. B. (1943). Morale of the Negro on the home front: World Wars I and II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 417–428.

      McMillian, L. K. (1943). Light which two world wars throw upon the plight of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 429–437.

      Miller, C. L. (1943). The Negro and volunteer war agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 438–451.

      Morton, M. M. (1943). The federal government and Negro morale. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 452–463.

      Lewis, R. E. (1943). The role of pressure groups in maintaining morale among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 464–473.

      Barnett, C. A. (1943). The role of the press, radio, and motion picture and Negro morale. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 474–489.

      Daniel, W. G., & Wright, M. T. (1943). The role of educational agencies in maintaining morale among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 490–501.

      Love, E. (1943). The role of the church in maintaining the morale of the Negro in World Wars I and II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 502–510.

      Reid, I. D. A. (1943). A critical summary: The Negro on the home front in World Wars I and II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 511–520.

      Part 3. The Negro in Post-War Reconstruction in World Wars I and II

      Tate, M. (1943). The war aims of World War I and World War II and their relation to the darker peoples of the world. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 521–532.

      Clement, R. E. (1943). Problems of demobilization and rehabilitation of the Negro soldier after World Wars I and II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 533–542.

      Ware, C. F. (1943). Implications for Negro Americans of the post-war planning activities of the U.S. government. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 543–556.

      McCulloch, M. C. (1943). What should the American Negro reasonably expect as the outcome of a real peace? The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 557–567.

      Reddick, L. D. (1943). What should the American Negro reasonably expect as the outcome of a real peace? The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 568–578.

      Porter, D. B. (1943). Selected references on the American Negro in World War I and World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 579–584.

      Volume 12Fall 1943Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1943). FEPC [Fair Employment Practices Commission] hearings reduce race problem to lowest—equal economic opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 585–588.

      Editorial

      Boykin, L. L. (1943). The survival and function of the Negro college in a changing social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 589–599.

      Hill, M. C., & Ackiss, T. D. (1943). Some ideological confusion among Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 600–606.

      Pugh, R. W. (1943). A comparative study of the adjustment of Negro students in mixed and separate high schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 607–616.

      Helgerson, E. (1943). The relative significance of race, sex, and facial expression in choice of playmate by the preschool child. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 617–622.

      Hulbert, J. A. (1943). The Negro college library. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 623–629.

      Tanser, H. A. (1943). Josiah Henson, the Moses of his people. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 630–632.

      Roucek, J. S. (1943). American Japanese, Pearl Harbor, and World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 633–649.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1943). Enrollment in institutions of higher education for Negroes, 1942–1943. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 687–693.

      Washington, A. H., & Williamson, A. O'H. (1943). Rural education: Wartime 1943–1944. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 693–700.

      Ransom, L. A. (1943). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 700. Quarles, B. (1943). One shortcoming in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 700–702.

      Scott, J. I. E. (1943). Educational improvement of the teaching personnel in Negro schools of Duval County [FL]. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 702–705.

      Lyells, R. E. S. (1943). The special book collection of the George C. Hall Branch Library [Chicago]. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 705–709.

      Myers, I. M. A. (1943). A study of anti-Negro prejudice. The Journal of Negro Education, 12, 709–714.

      Volume 13Winter 1944Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1944). Race relations in the United States: The need for effective leadership. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 1–6.

      Editorial

      Locke, A. L. (1944). The Negro in the three Americas. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 7–18.

      Daniel, V. E. (1944). Negro classes and life in the church. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 19–29.

      Jackson, R. E. (1944). Financial aid given by southern states to Negroes for out-of-state study. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 30–39.

      Richards, E. S. (1944). Migration and the social education of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 40–46.

      Lee, M. A. (1944). Improving the reading of the Negro rural teacher in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 47–56.

      Marcson, S. (1944). Ethnic and class education. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 57–63.

      Long, H. H. (1944). Tested personality adjustment in Jewish and non-Jewish groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 64–69.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Chivers, W. R. (1944). Trend of race relations in the South during war times. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 104–111.

      Washington, A. H. (1944). Rural education: Wartime 1944–1945. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 111–112.

      Williams, M. T. (1944). Geography teaching and the rural teacher. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 113–115.

      Weatherford, A. E. E. (1944). A study in graduate placement as an aid to Negro deans and advisers in their personnel work. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 115–120.

      Morgan, M. R. (1944). Chicago school curriculum includes Negro achievements. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 120–123.

      Byas, V. W. (1944). A Negro travels in Mexico. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 123–128.

      Ransom, L. A. (1944). Education and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 128–130.

      Volume 13Spring 1944Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1944). Some initial observations on the Carnegie Corporation's study of the Negro in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 131–138.

      Editorial

      Cox, O. C. (1944). Class and caste: A definition and a distinction. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 139–149.

      Conrad, E. (1944). The philology of Negro dialect. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 150–154.

      Lee, G. C., & Lee, M. A. (1944). “For health's sake—write it in basic English.” The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 155–161.

      Lash, J. (1944). Educational implications of the Negro college radio program. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 162–168.

      Scott, J. I. E. (1944). The professional functions of Negro principals in the public schools of Florida in relation to status. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 169–173.

      Jackson, W. V. (1944). Building our future with books. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 174–179.

      Knox, E. O. (1944). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1943. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 180–190.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1944). Enrollment in institutions of higher education for Negroes, 1943–1944. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 227–233.

      Washington, A. H. (1944). Rural education: Wartime 1944–1945. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 233–237.

      Poole, C. C. (1944). The National Non-Partisan Council of Public Affairs of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 238–242.

      Stokes, A. P. (1944). Committee on the American Negro in defense industries. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 242–248.

      Johnson, C. S. (1944). The race relations program of the American Missionary Association. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 248–252.

      Long, H. H. (1944). Federal-aid-to-education legislation. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 252–254.

      The Negro and the Democratic Primary in the South—Smith v. Allwright et al. (1944). The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 254–264.

      Volume 13Summer 1944Number 3

      Education for Racial Understanding

      Yearbook Number 13

      Editorial Comment

      Jenkins, M. D. (1944). Education for racial understanding. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 265–269.

      Part I: Bases of Education for Racial Understanding

      Thompson, E. T. (1944). Race in the modern world. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 270–279.

      Brown, I. C. (1944). Race relations in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 280–286.

      Hartley, E. L. (1944). Psychological investigations and the modification of racial attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 287–294.

      Powdermaker, H. (1944). The anthropological approach to the problem of modifying race attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 295–302.

      Part II: Educational Programs for the Improvement of Race Relations

      McCulloch, M. C. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Seven religious agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 303–315.

      Clement, R. E. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Interracial committees. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 316–328.

      Brownlee, F. L. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Philanthropic foundations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 329–339.

      Davis, J. A. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Organized labor and industrial organizations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 340–348.

      Wright, M. T. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Negro advancement organizations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 349–360.

      Smith, A. E. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Government agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 361–366.

      Reddick, L. D. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: Motion pictures, radio, the press, and libraries. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 367–389.

      Bond, J. M. (1944). Educational programs for the improvement of race relations: The schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 390–397.

      Locke, A. L. (1944). Whither race relations? A critical commentary. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 398–406.

      Part III: Next Steps in Education for Racial Understanding

      Lindeman, E. C. (1944). Next steps in education for racial understanding: A philosophical approach. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 407–413.

      Weaver, G. L. P. (1944). The role of organized labor in education for racial understanding. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 414–420.

      Ware, C. F. (1944). The role of the schools in education for racial understanding. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 421–431.

      Wilkins, R. (1944). Next steps in education for racial understanding. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 432–440.

      Johnson, C. S. (1944). The next decade in race relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 441–446.

      Volume 13Fall 1944Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1944). The Negro and his immediate post-war prospects. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 447–451.

      Editorial

      Cox, O. C. (1944). The racial theories of Robert E. Park and Ruth Benedict. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 452–463.

      Frazier, E. F. (1944). The role of Negro schools in the post-war world. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 464–473.

      Tomlinson, H. (1944). Differences between pre-school Negro children and their older siblings on the Stanford-Binet scales. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 474–479.

      Totty, S. V. (1944). Business education in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 480–487.

      Brown, A. (1944). An evaluation of the accredited secondary schools for Negroes in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 488–498.

      Weatherford, A. E. E. (1944). Recreation in the Negro church in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 499–508.

      McKinney, R. I. (1944). Religion in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 509–519.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      McPheeters, A. L. W. (1944). An educational program for the blind as conducted by a public library. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 549–552.

      Washington, A. H. (1944). Rural education: Wartime 1944–45. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 552–554.

      Kittrell, F. P. (1944). A nutrition workshop. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 554–557.

      Troup, C. V. (1944). A program of functional education at Fessenden Academy [FL]. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 557–560.

      Weaver, R. C. (1944). City of Chicago: Mayor's Committee on Race Relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 560–562.

      Embree, E. E. (1944). The American Council on Race Relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 562–564.

      Gamble, J. D. (1944). Interracial Code of the Council of Social Agencies of Metropolitan Detroit. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 564–565.

      Williams, E. (1944). Establishment of a university of the West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 565–568.

      Johnson, C. S. (1944). The American Missionary Association Institute of Race Relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 13, 568–574.

      Volume 14Winter 1945Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1945). Postwar prospects of equitable educational opportunity for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 1–5.

      Editorial

      Townsend, W. S. (1945). Full employment and the Negro worker. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 6–10.

      Jenkins, M. (1945). The impact of African music upon the western hemisphere. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 11–17.

      Lash, J. S. (1945). Current opinion on the teaching of the literature of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 18–27.

      Woolridge, N. B. (1945). The slave preacher—Portrait of a leader. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 28–37.

      Grossley, R. S. (1945). The Negro college and its public relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 38–47.

      Brown, W. H. (1945). An experimental study of workshop-type professional education for Negro teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 48–58.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Hamilton, W. A. (1945). The returning soldier. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 93–97.

      Washington, A. H. (1945). Rural education—Wartime 1944–1945: The White House conference on rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 98–102.

      Nichols, F. O., & Pierce, J. A. (1945). A project to study business and business education among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 102–105.

      Johnston, J. H. (1945). The Virginia Conference for College and Public School Personnel. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 105–109.

      Lane, L. (1945). Report of the Committee on Cultural Minorities of the American Federation of Teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 109–112.

      Edwards, G. F. (1945). Post-war industrial status of Negroes discussed at Howard University. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 112–115.

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1945). The United Negro College Fund. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 115–117.

      Lane, F. T. (1945). An educational program for the adjustment of Negroes to urban living. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 117–122.

      Tate, M. (1945). The twenty-ninth annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 122–125.

      Volume 14Spring 1945Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1945). Peacetime compulsory military training and the Negro's status in the armed forces. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 127–131.

      Editorial

      Cox, O. C. (1945). An American dilemma: A mystical approach to the study of race relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 132–148.

      Murray, W. I. (1945). A study of an aspect of social sensitivity of some Negro high school pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 149–152.

      Lyells, R. E. S. (1945). The library in Negro land-grant colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 153–165.

      Whitehead, M. J. (1945). Origin and establishment of the Negro college deanship. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 166–173.

      Walker, D. R. (1945). The need of sex education in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 174–181.

      Knox, E. O. (1945). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1944. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 182–196.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1945). Enrollment in institutions of higher education for Negroes, 1944–1945. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 238–244.

      Washington, A. H. (1945). Rural education: Wartime 1945–46. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 244–247.

      Walker, G. H., Jr. (1945). A remedial reading clinic workshop. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 247–251.

      Catterns, C. M. (1945). Teacher training in the British colonies. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 251–253.

      Woods, L. L. (1945). Chemistry in the Negro college curriculum. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 254–255.

      Reedy, S. J. (1945). Graduate work in selected White and Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 256–258.

      Kidd, R. (1945). Toward a saner philosophy of business education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 258–262.

      Haynes, G. E. (1945). The interracial clinic. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 262–267.

      Wedge, E. (1945). Honor roll in race relations, 1944. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 267–268.

      Volume 14Summer 1945Number 3

      Adult Education for Negroes in the United States

      Yearbook Number 14

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1945). Adult education for Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 269–271.

      Part 1: The Need For and Philosophy of Adult Education

      Johnson, E. S. (1945). The need for a philosophy of adult education. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 272–282.

      Cartwright, M. A. (1945). The history of adult education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 283–292.

      Witty, P. (1945). What the war has taught us about adult education. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 293–298.

      Reid, I. D. A. (1945). The development of adult education for Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 299–306.

      Part 2: Adult Education Programs among Negroes

      Cooper, W. M. (1945). Adult education programs of Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 307–311.

      Redd, G. N. (1945). Adult education for Negroes under public school auspices. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 312–321.

      Williams, D. G. (1945). Adult education in public libraries and museums. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 322–330.

      McAllister, J. E., & McAllister, D. M. (1945). Adult education for Negroes in rural areas: The work of the Jeanes teachers and home and farm demonstration agents. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 331–340.

      Hubert, G. A. (1945). Some recent developments in adult education among Negroes in agriculture. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 341–346.

      Lindsay, I. B. (1945). Adult education programs for Negroes in settlement houses. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 347–352.

      Horne, F. S., & Robinson, C. K. (1945). Adult educational programs in housing projects with Negro tenants. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 353–362.

      Mitchell, E. C. (1945). Adult health education and recreational programs: National, state, and local. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 363–373.

      Partridge, D. C. (1945). Adult education projects sponsored by Negro college fraternities and sororities. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 374–380.

      Gandy, S. L. (1945). The Negro church and the adult education phases of its program. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 381–384.

      Bullock, R. W. (1945). The adult education program of the YMCA among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 385–389.

      Height, D. I. (1945). The adult education program of the YWCA among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 390–395.

      Heningburg, A. (1945). Adult education and the National Urban League. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 396–402.

      Wilkins, R. (1945). Adult education program of the NAACP. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 403–406.

      Hall, W. A. (1945). Adult education programs of labor unions and other workers groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 407–411.

      Menchan, W. M. (1945). Adult education programs of Negro parent-teacher associations. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 412–417.

      Cooke, A. M. (1945). The little theatre movement as an adult education project among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 418–424.

      Wormley, M. J. (1945). Adult education in federal prisons. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 425–430.

      Lawson, M. M. (1945). The adult education aspects of the Negro press. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 431–436.

      Evans, J. C. (1945). Adult education for Negroes in the armed forces. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 437–442.

      Part 3: Extension and Improvement of Adult Educational Activities Among Negroes

      Blackwell, G. W. (1945). Evaluation of present programs of adult education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 443–452.

      Locke, A. L. (1945). Areas of extension and improvement of adult education among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 453–459.

      Ridley, W. N. (1945). Wider use of audio-visual aids in adult education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 460–466.

      Caliver, A., & Wilkins, T. (1945). Neglected areas of adult education among Negroes: Teacher-training programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 467–476.

      Jackson, L. P. (1945). Citizenship training—a neglected area in adult education. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 477–487.

      Reddick, L. D. (1945). Adult education and the improvement of race relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 488–493.

      Atkins, J. A. (1945). Resource materials and agencies for adult education. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 494–508.

      Volume 14Fall 1945Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1945). Some critical aspects of the problem of the higher and professional education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 509–526.

      Editorial

      Mays, B. E. (1945). Democratizing and Christianizing America in this generation. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 527–534.

      Stokes, A. P. (1945). American race relations in war time. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 535–551.

      Mason, L. R. (1945). The CIO [Congress of Industrial Organizations] and the Negro in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 552–561.

      McCulloch, M. C. (1945). Race relations and age. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 562–565.

      Barnett, C. A. (1945). The post-war outlook for the southern rural Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 566–575.

      Cox, O. C. (1945). Lynching and the status quo. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 576–588.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance

      Boardman, H. (1945). Elementary propaganda. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 619–622.

      Washington, A. H. (1945). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 622–624.

      Carney, M. (1945). Rural education in American universities, 1944–1945. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 624–627.

      Bond, H. M. (1945). What the San Francisco Conference means to the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 627–630.

      Parker, M. H. (1945). The English language program in the public elementary schools of Puerto Rico. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 631–635.

      Pipes, W. H. (1945). Mend your speech, professor, lest you mar your students. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 635–642.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1945). A listing of the significant programs in institutions of higher education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 642–644.

      Norris, E. M. (1945). Prairie View State College and community relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 644–648.

      Pecot, S. (1945). The Conference of Southern Students. The Journal of Negro Education, 14, 648–651.

      Volume 15Winter 1946Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1946). Booker T. Washington is elected to the Hall of Fame. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Jones, C. R. (1946). Social stratification in the Negro population: A study of social classes in South Boston, Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 4–12.

      Parrish, C. H. (1946). Color names and color notions. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 13–20.

      Young, M. N. E. (1946). Some sociological aspects of vocational guidance of Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 21–30.

      Dummett, C. O. (1946). Improving dentistry in the Negro population. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 31–35.

      Turner, T. W. (1946). Science teaching in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 36–42.

      Brigham, R. I. (1946). Trends in Negro education: A reader's view. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 43–54.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Ransom, L. A. (1946). Education and the law—The Newport News [VA] case. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 92–95.

      Washington, A. H., & Carney, M. (1946). Rural education: Rural education in American universities, 1944–1945. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 95–102.

      Duncan, C. W. (1946). Teacher education at Fort Valley State College. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 102–108.

      Voorhees, L. W. (1946). A program of speech education for Talladega College. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 109–116.

      Alston, R., & Fitchett, E. H. (1946). Study conference on the twelve-year program of the public schools of South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 117–118.

      Walker, G. H., Jr. (1946). Remedial reading programs in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 119–121.

      Funkhouser, W. D. (1946). Conferences on graduate work in Negro institutions in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 122–127.

      Volume 15Spring 1946Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1946). The Fair Employment Practice Act temporarily shelved. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 129–133.

      Editorial

      Savage, W. S. (1946). Early Negro education in the Pacific Coast states. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 134–139.

      Clift, V. A. (1946). Criteria for teacher education in Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 140–145.

      Walker, A. J. (1946). Vocational choices of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 146–152.

      Nyabongo, V. S. (1946). Achievement in modern foreign languages in Negro colleges of America. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 153–160.

      Redd, G. N. (1946). Resources for graduate work for Negroes in the states of Alabama, Kentucky, and Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 161–171.

      Cotton, G. R. (1946). Collegiate technical education for Negroes in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 172–180.

      Kentworthy, L. S. (1946). James K. Aggrey: Reconciler of races. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 181–190.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1946). Enrollment in institutions of higher education for Negroes 1945–1946. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 231–239.

      Washington, A. H. (1946). Rural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 239–246.

      Whiting, H. A. (1946). The teaching practice program of the Atlanta Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 246–251.

      Spellman, C. L. (1946). Some phases of the plan for post-war education in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 251–255.

      Phelps-Stokes Fund names southerner president and Negro director. (1946). The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 255–256.

      Winston, E. B. (1946). The day care program for children in Hartford, Connecticut. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 257–261.

      Volume 15Summer 1946Number 3

      The Problem of Education in Dependent Territories

      Yearbook Number 15

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1946). The problem of education in dependent territories. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 263–266.

      Editorial

      Part 1. Some General Problems of Education in Dependent Territories

      Turner, R. E. (1946). The modern imperial process: The present phase and its significance. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 267–284.

      Logan, R. W. (1946). The system of international trusteeship. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 285–299.

      Benson, W. (1946). International organization and non-self-governing territories. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 300–310.

      Du Bois, W. E. B. (1946). Colonies and moral responsibility. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 311–318.

      Ross, E. (1946). The role of Christian missions in education and development in dependent territories. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 319–335.

      Tax, S. (1946). The education of underprivileged peoples in dependent and independent territories. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 336–345.

      Mead, M. (1946). Professional problems of education in dependent countries. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 346–357.

      Part 2. The Problem of Education in Dependent Territories

      Section A—Africa

      Davis, J. (1946). Education in British West Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 358–369.

      Wrong, M. (1946). Education in British Central and South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 370–381.

      Wieschhoff, H. A. (1946). Education in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and British East Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 382–395.

      De La Roche, J. (1946). Education in French equatorial and French West Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 396–409.

      Harris, J. S. (1946). Education in the Belgian Congo. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 410–426.

      Section B—America

      Hammond, S. A. (1946). Education in the British West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 427–449.

      Einaar, J. F. E. (1946). Education in the Netherlands and French West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 450–461.

      Blauch, L. E. (1946). Education in the territories and outlying possessions of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 462–479.

      Section C—Asia

      Cleisz, G. (1946). The problem of education in French Asia, Oceania and Australasia. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 480–493.

      Emerson, R. (1946). Education in the Netherlands East Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 494–507.

      McLean, W. (1946). Education in Malaya. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 508–512.

      Sundaram, M. S. (1946). Education in British India. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 513–525.

      Hillman, O. (1946). Education in Burma. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 526–533.

      Part 3. A General Critical Appraisal of Education in Dependent Territories

      Williams, E. (1946). Education in dependent territories in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 534–551.

      Siegel, M. (1946). Educational opportunity in dependent territories in Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 552–563.

      Vandenbosch, A. (1946). The provision of education in dependent territories. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 564–570.

      Embree, E. R. (1946). Education for one world. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 571–578.

      Volume 15Fall 1946Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1946). The critical situation in Negro higher and professional education. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 579–584.

      Editorial

      Davenport, R. K. (1946). Implications of military selection and classification in relation to universal military training. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 585–594.

      Aptheker, H. (1946). Literacy, the Negro, and World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 595–602.

      Cox, O. C. (1946). The nature of the anti-Asiatic movement on the Pacific coast. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 603–614.

      Martin, W. H. (1946). Practices utilized in promoting the in-service professional improvement of Negro techniques. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 615–620.

      Saundle, J. S. (1946). The rise of the Negro Assistant County Superintendent in West Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 621–627.

      Williams, H. H. (1946). A study of landscaping in Negro communities of the southeastern states. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 628–637.

      Knox, E. O. (1946). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1945. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 638–646.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Catchings, L. M. (1946). The participation of racial and nationality minority peoples in Congregational-Christian Churches. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 681–689.

      Dorey, F. D. (1946). Negro college graduates in schools of religion. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 689–694.

      Colbert, R. E. (1946). The attitude of older Negro residents toward recent Negro migrants in the Pacific Northwest. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 695–703.

      Fitchett, E. H. (1946). The new program for the recertification of teachers in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 703–716.

      Ransom, R. C., III. (1946). Jamaican workers in the state of Connecticut. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 717–721.

      Lash, J. S. (1946). The American Negro in American literature: A selected bibliography of critical materials. The Journal of Negro Education, 15, 722–730.

      Volume 16Winter 1947Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1947). The improvement of the Negro college faculty. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 1–9.

      Editorial

      Lyman, J. L. (1947). Jefferson and Negro slavery. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 10–27.

      Gresham, L. W. (1947). Colonization proposals for free Negroes and contrabands during the Civil War. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 28–33.

      Winton, R. M. (1947). Negro participation in southern expositions, 1881–1915. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 34–43.

      Anderson, W. E. (1947). The personality characteristics of 153 Negro pupils, Dunbar High School, Okmulgee, Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 44–48.

      Bayton, J. A., & Byoune, E. F. (1947). Racio-national stereotypes held by Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 49–56.

      Hughes, W. H. (1947). What about human equality? The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 57–60.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Baker, O. J. (1947). The improvement of the Negro college library. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 91–100.

      Washington, A. H. (1947). Rural education—To the teachers of rural America. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 100–104.

      Robinson, J. R. (1947). The developmental reading program at Talladega College. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 104–107.

      Larsen, C. E. (1947). The challenge of intercultural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 108–111.

      Posey, T. E. (1947). Workers' education: A challenge to Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 112–115.

      Boulware, M. H. (1947). Speech training in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 115–122.

      Volume 16Spring 1947Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1947). “Best practices in race relations in the South.” The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 123–129.

      Editorial

      Weaver, R. C. (1947). A needed program of research in race relations and associated problems. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 130–135.

      Robinson, M. L., & Meenes, M. (1947). The relationship between test intelligence of third grade Negro children and the occupations of their parents. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 136–141.

      Allen, L. B. (1947). Religious attitudes of a selected group of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 142–147.

      Bradley, G. H. (1947). Some health education implications of the physical examinations of Negroes in World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 148–154.

      Cox, O. C. (1947). Modern democracy and the class struggle. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 155–164.

      Bond, H. M. (1947). Education for political and social responsibility: Its natural history in the American college. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 165–171.

      Chick, C. A. (1947). Some recent United States Supreme Court decisions affecting the rights of Negro workers. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 172–179.

      Knox, E. O. (1947). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1946. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 180–189.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1947). Enrollment in institutions of higher education for Negroes, 1946–47. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 224–232.

      Walker, G. H., Jr. (1947). Negro educators consider problem of reading on college level—With statement of future institutional plans. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 233–235.

      Coleman, A. F. (1947). The salary equalization movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 235–241.

      Brigham, R. I. (1947). Provisions for graduate work for Negroes in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 242–246.

      Cochran, A. S. (1947). The development of teacher education at Morris Brown College. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 246–251.

      Ford, J. W. (1947). The vital problem of the right of trade unions in countries of Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 251–256.

      Washington, A. H. (1947). Selected 1946 references on rural life and education. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 256–261.

      Volume 16Summer 1947Number 3

      The Availability of Education in the Negro Separate School

      Yearbook Number 16

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1947). The availability of education in the Negro separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 263–268.

      Editorial

      Part 1. The General Character and Extent of Separate Schools

      Knox, E. O. (1947). The origin and development of the Negro separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 269–279.

      Johnson, G. M., & Lucas, J. M. (1947). The present legal status of the Negro separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 280–289.

      Reddick, L. D. (1947). The education of Negroes in states where separate schools are not legal. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 290–300.

      Jackson, R. E. (1947). The development and character of permissive and partly segregated schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 301–310.

      Part 2. Availability of Education in the Several States

      Anderson, W. E. (1947). The education of Negroes in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 311–316.

      Martin, W. H. (1947). The education of Negroes in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 317–324.

      Morton, M. A. (1947). The education of Negroes in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 325–339.

      Bracey, H. H. (1947). The education of Negroes in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 340–346.

      Brown, A. (1947). The education of Negroes in Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 347–353.

      Parrish, C. H. (1947). The education of Negroes in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 354–360.

      Cade, J. B. (1947). The education of Negroes in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 361–369.

      Bradley, G. H. (1947). The education of Negroes in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 370–374.

      Alexander, F. O. (1947). The education of Negroes in Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 375–380.

      Reedy, S. J. (1947). The education of Negroes in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 381–386.

      Harris, N. H. (1947). The education of Negroes in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 387–396.

      Perry, T. A. (1947). The education of Negroes in Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 397–404.

      DeCosta, F. (1947). The education of Negroes in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 405–416.

      Roberts, S. O. (1947). The education of Negroes in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 417–424.

      Bullock, H. A. (1947). The availability of education in the Texas Negro separate school. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 425–432.

      Greene, H. W. (1947). The education of Negroes in West Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 433–438.

      Part 3. The Availability of Education for Negroes in the United States

      Washington, A. H. (1947). Availability of education for Negroes in the elementary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 439–449.

      Daniel, W. G. (1947). Availability of education for Negroes in the secondary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 450–458.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1947). The availability of higher education for Negroes in the southern states. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 459–473.

      Long, H. H. (1947). Availability of special educational services to Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 474–479.

      Volume 16Fall 1947Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1947). Negro higher education in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 481–490.

      Editorial

      Levin, H. O. (1947). The legal basis for segregated schools in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 491–505.

      Cox, O. C. (1947). The nature of race relations: A critique. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 506–510.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1947). The Negro press. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 511–521.

      Tatum, E. L. (1947). The changed political thoughts of Negroes of the United States 1915–1940. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 522–533.

      Siegel, M. (1947). Felix Eboué and colonial policy. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 534–544.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Woodson, G. I. (1947). Community related programs at West Virginia State College. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 594–596.

      Nyabongo, V. S. (1947). Modern foreign languages in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 596–600.

      Ferguson, I. L. (1947). Education in Jamaica, British West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 600–603.

      Gray, W. H., Jr. (1947). Recommendation of an out-of-state scholarship fund for Negroes in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 604–609.

      Whiting, A. N. (1947). Clay, starch, and soot eating among southern rural Negroes in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 16, 610–612.

      Volume 17Winter 1948Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1948). The Report of the President's Committee on Civil Rights. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 1–9.

      Editorial

      Bustard, J. L. (1948). Administrative experiences of the New Jersey Division Against Discrimination. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 10–17.

      Marcuse, F. L. (1948). Some attitudes toward employing Negroes as teachers in a northern university. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 18–26.

      Cook, L. A. (1948). The college study in intergroup relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 27–41.

      Boykin, L. L. (1948). The vocational education and guidance of Negro youth in changing social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 42–49.

      Brigham, R. I. (1948). Negro public colleges in St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 50–57.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jensen, N. (1948). A survey of segregation practices in the New Jersey Public School System. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 84–87.

      Smythe, H. H. (1948). The N.A.A.C.P. petition on the denial of human rights and the United Nations. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 88–90.

      Harris, N. H. (1948). Student teaching in the Negro colleges of North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 91–97.

      Lockwood, G. P. (1948). I participated in a workshop in human relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 97–99.

      Volume 17Spring 1948Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1948). Extension of segregation through regional schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 101–105.

      Editorial

      Himes, J. S., & Manley, A. E. (1948). Guidance in Negro secondary schools in the south-eastern region. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 106–113.

      Smith, B. F. (1948). The school librarian and the reading process. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 114–119.

      Canady, H. G. (1948). The social psychology of youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 120–123.

      Abraham, A. A. (1948). Juvenile delinquency in Buffalo and its prevention. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 124–133.

      Clift, V. A. (1948). The role of higher education in transmitting democratic ideals into behavior patterns. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 134–140.

      Atkins, J. A. (1948). Negro educational institutions and the Veterans' Educational Facilities Program. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 141–153.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Kittrell, F. P. (1948). Some observations on life and education in West Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 192–194.

      Cochrane, H. S. (1948). The visiting teacher in the Atlanta Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 195–200.

      Carnegie, M. E. L. (1948). Nurse training becomes nursing education at Florida A & M College. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 200–204.

      Lloyd, R. G. (1948). Are remedial writing programs needed in Negro colleges and universities? The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 204–206.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1948). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1947–48. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 206–215.

      Washington, A. H., & Dunlap, I. E. (1949). Selected 1947 references on rural life and education. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 215–220.

      Volume 17Summer 1948Number 3

      Negro Higher and Professional Education in the United States

      Yearbook Number 17

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 221–223.

      Editorial

      Part 1. Evolution and Present Status

      Bond, H. M. (1948). The evolution and present status of Negro higher and professional education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 224–235.

      Reddick, L. D. (1948). How much higher and professional education does the Negro need? The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 236–239.

      Caliver, A. (1948). The education of Negro leaders. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 240–248.

      Part 2. Negro Higher and Professional Education in the Several States

      Anderson, W. E. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 249–254.

      Martin, W. H. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 255–264.

      Wright, M. T. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Delaware. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 265–271.

      Bracey, H. H. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 272–279.

      Brown, A. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 280–288.

      Parrish, C. H., Jr. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 289–295.

      Cade, J. B., & Hebert, E. L. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 296–302.

      Bradley, G. H. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 303–311.

      Alexander, F. O., & Whiteside, M. G. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 312–320.

      Reedy, S. J. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 321–334.

      Harris, N. H. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 335–340.

      Richards, E. S. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 341–349.

      DeCosta, F. A. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 350–360.

      Roberts, S. O. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 361–372.

      Bullock, H. A. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Texas. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 373–381.

      Daniel, W. G. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 382–392.

      Greene, H. W. (1948). Negro higher and professional education in West Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 393–399.

      Part 3. Looking Ahead

      Redd, G. N. (1948). Present status of Negro higher and professional education: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 400–409.

      Reid, H. O., & Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1948). Remedies under statutes granting federal aid to land grant colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 410–425.

      Bonds, A. B., Jr. (1948). The President's Commission on Higher Education and Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 426–436.

      Volume 17Fall 1948Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1948). Administrators of Negro colleges and the color line in higher education in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 437–445.

      Editorial

      Franklin, J. H. (1948). Whither reconstruction historiography? The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 446–461.

      Butcher, P. (1948). George W. Cable and Booker T. Washington. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 462–468.

      Blue, J. T., Jr. (1948). The relationship of juvenile delinquency, race, and economic status. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 469–477.

      Roberts, H. W. (1948). The rural Negro minister: His educational status. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 478–487.

      Knox, E. O. (1948). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1947. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 488–496.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Chick, C. A., Sr. (1948). Some economic and social implications of court decisions affecting the rights of Negroes on public conveyances. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 537–544.

      Clark, E. R. (1948). Negro stereotypes. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 545–549.

      Smythe, H. H., & Smith, R. (1948). Race policies and practices in selected public school systems of Pennsylvania. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 549–554.

      Partridge, D. C. (1948). Directives for designing the curriculum of Negro rural schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 554–555.

      Palmer, L. F., Jr. (1948). Public relations—A new development in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 17, 556–561.

      Volume 18Winter 1949Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1949). Why Negroes are opposed to segregated regional schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 1–8.

      Editorial

      Bryant, I. B. (1949). Vocational education in Negro high schools in Texas. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 9–15.

      Abramowitz, J. (1949). Common distortions in the textbook treatment of slavery. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 16–21.

      Schiffman, J. (1949). The education of Negro soldiers in World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 22–28.

      Farrison, W. E. (1949). William Wells Brown, social reformer. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 29–39.

      Boykin, L. L. (1949). The status and trends of differentials between White and Negro teachers' salaries in the southern states, 1900–1946. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 40–47.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Martin, W. H. (1949). Recent developments in the education of Negro teachers in Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 77–80.

      Murray, W. I. (1949). The reading workshop at Jackson College. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 81–83.

      Green, R. F. (1949). The critical position of the “Colored people” in South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 84–87.

      Lawrence, P. F. (1949). A progress report on Negro Pepsi-Cola scholarship winners. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 88–91.

      Volume 18Spring 1949Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1949). Keeping up the fight for civil rights. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 93–94.

      Editorial

      Cooke, P. (1949). The cost of segregated public schools in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 95–103.

      Mundy, P. (1949). The young Negro worker in Washington, D.C. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 104–113.

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1949). The problems of financing private Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 114–122.

      Bustard, J. L. (1949). The operation of the New Jersey law against discrimination, 1947–48. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 123–133.

      Miller, P. S. (1949). Racial and nationalistic hurdles in the teaching of literature. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 134–137.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Three Virginia public school cases. (1949). The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 173–179.

      School officials held in contempt of court for failure to equalize schools. (1949). The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 179–186.

      Second National Conference on Intergroup Relations. (1949). The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 186–191.

      Report of the Connecticut Interracial Commission, 1947–1948. (1949). The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 191–196.

      Volume 18Summer 1949Number 3

      Survey of the Health Status, Facilities and Education of Negroes

      Yearbook Number 18

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1949). The health status and health education of Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 197–199.

      Editorial

      Part 1. A General Introductory Statement

      Scheele, L. A. (1949). The health status and health education of Negroes—A general introductory statement. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 200–208.

      Part 2. The Health Status of Negroes

      Dublin, L. I. (1949). The problem of Negro health as revealed by vital statistics. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 209–214.

      Gover, M. (1949). A survey of Negro mortality: Vital statistics of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 215–224.

      Payne, H. M. (1949). Leading causes of death among Negroes: Tuberculosis. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 225–234.

      Callis, H. A. (1949). Leading causes of death among Negroes: The degenerative diseases. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 235–239.

      Schwartz, E. E. (1949). Infant and maternal mortality among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 240–250.

      Grover, M. (1949). Physical defects of White and Negro families examined by the Farm Security Administration, 1940. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 251–265.

      Jones, R. F., & Price, K. A. (1949). Trends in venereal diseases. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 266–275.

      Williams, E. Y., & Carmichael, C. P. (1949). The incidence of mental disease in the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 276–282.

      McLean, H. V. (1949). The emotional health of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 283–290.

      Nutrition Branch and Program Analysis Branch, Division of Chronic Disease, Public Health Service, FSA. (1949). The nutritional status of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 291–304.

      Part 3. Health Facilities Available to Negroes

      Davis, M. M., & Smythe, H. H. (1949). Providing adequate health service to Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 305–317.

      Roemer, M. I. (1949). Special health problems of Negroes in rural areas. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 318–325.

      Dent, A. W. (1949). Hospital services and facilities available to Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 326–332.

      Boas, E. P. (1949). The cost of medical care as a factor in the availability of health facilities for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 333–339.

      Cobb, W. M. (1949). Special problems in the provision of medical services for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 340–345.

      Johnson, J. L. (1949). The supply of Negro health personnel—Physicians. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 346–356.

      Dixon, R. A., & Byrd, G. E. (1949). The supply of Negro health personnel—Dentists. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 357–363.

      Osborne, E. M. (1949). Status and contribution of the Negro nurse. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 364–369.

      Part 4. The Health Education of Negroes

      Cornely, P. B. (1949). The nature and extent of health education among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 370–376.

      Brown, R. C. (1949). The health education programs of government and voluntary agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 377–387.

      Lenroot, K. (1949). The Children's Bureau and health education. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 388–397.

      Phipard, E. F. (1949). The participation of government agencies in a nutrition program. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 398–408.

      Davis, C. W. (1949). Health education programs in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 409–417.

      Maxwell, C. H., & Pennell, M. Y. (1949). Health services in Negro schools of less than college grade. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 418–421.

      Kittrell, F. P. (1949). The Negro family as a health agency. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 422–428.

      Part 5. Some General Implications and Suggestions

      Johnson, C. S. (1949). The socio-economic background of Negro health status. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 429–435.

      Ewing, O. R. (1949). The president's health program and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 436–443.

      Volume 18Fall 1949Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1949). Federal aid to education and Negro separate public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 445–451.

      Editorial

      Codwell, J. E. (1949). Motor function and the hybridity of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 452–464.

      Bayton, J. A. (1949). The guidance dilemma—With special reference to the guidance of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 465–473.

      Johnson, O. C. (1949). Preventive remedial English in the Negro secondary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 474–483.

      Faggett, H. L. (1949). The Shepard tradition. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 484–488.

      Knox, E. O. (1949). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1948. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 489–497.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Atwood, R. B., Smith, H. S., & Vaughan, C. O. (1949). Negro teachers in northern colleges and universities in the United States, 1940–49. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 559–567.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1949). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1948–49. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 568–575.

      Troup, C. V. (1949). Some significant programs initiated at Negro colleges and universities during the school year 1948–49. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 576–582.

      Allman, R. W. (1949). A study of general education with emphasis on teacher education in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 18, 582–588.

      Desegregation Years (1950–1959)
      Volume 19Winter 1950Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1950). Some progress in the elimination of discrimination in higher education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 1–6.

      Editorial

      Fleming, G. J. (1950). Educational aspects of FEPC [Massachusetts Fair Employment Practices Commission] laws. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 7–15.

      Eusebius, M. (1950). A modern Moses: Harriet Tubman. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 16–27.

      Jones, L. W. (1950). The agent as a factor in the education of Negroes in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 28–37.

      Harrison, E. C. (1950). An evaluation of industrial education in secondary schools for Negroes in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 38–46.

      Lawrence, P. F. (1950). Vocational aspirations of Negro youth of California. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 47–56.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Silverman, M. (1950). Report of activities of the Connecticut State Inter-Racial Commission, 1948–1949. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 83–93.

      Zeligs, R. (1950). Growth in intergroup attitudes during Brotherhood Week [OH]. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 94–102.

      Singletary, J. D. (1950). Individualized education in college? The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 103–107.

      Bowen, H. A. (1950). Orientation services in the Negro land grant colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 108–114.

      American Council on Education. (1950). Conference on discrimination in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 115–117.

      Dombrowski, J. A. (1950). Attitudes of southern university professors toward the elimination of segregation in graduate and professional schools in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 118–133.

      Volume 19Spring 1950Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1950). The South's legal defense of segregated schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 135–141.

      Editorial

      Buggs, C. W. (1950). Problems in the premedical education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 142–151.

      Goff, R. M. (1950). Problems and emotional difficulties of Negro children due to race. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 152–158.

      Duncan, C. J. W. (1950). Pre-service teacher education for Negroes in Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 159–166.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1950). Enrollment in institutions of higher education for Negroes, 1949–50. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 197–208.

      McGinnis, F. A. (1950). Negro students in Ohio colleges, school year, 1948–49. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 209–210.

      Butcher, M. J. (1950). Exchange teaching for professional growth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 211–214.

      Volume 19Summer 1950Number 3

      The Negro Child in the American Social Order

      Yearbook Number 19

      Editorial Comments

      Thompson, C. H. (1950). The Negro child in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 215–218.

      Editorial

      Part 1. The Status of the Negro Minority in the American Social Order

      Walker, H. J. (1950). The nature and characteristics of the Negro community. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 219–231.

      Weaver, R. C. (1950). The economic status of the Negro in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 232–243.

      Redd, G. N. (1950). The educational and cultural level of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 244–252.

      Reid, I. D. (1950). The socialization of the Negro in the American social order. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 253–260.

      Part 2. Some General Problems and Needs of Negro Children and Youth

      Valien, P. (1950). The Negro child and youth population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 261–268.

      Frazier, E. F. (1950). Problems and needs of Negro children and youth resulting from family disorganization. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 269–277.

      Taylor, R. B. (1950). Health problems and needs of Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 278–289.

      Diggs, M. H. (1950). Some problems and needs of children as revealed by comparative delinquency and crime statistics. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 290–297.

      Lee, J. O. (1950). The religious life and needs of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 298–309.

      Wright, M. T. (1950). Some educational and cultural problems and needs of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 310–321.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1950). Intellectually superior Negro youth: Problems and needs. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 322–332.

      Clift, V. A. (1950). Recreational and leisure-time problems and needs of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 333–340.

      Clark, K. B., & Clark, M. P. (1950). Emotional factors in racial identification and preference in Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 341–350.

      Roberts, S. O. (1950). Some mental and emotional health needs of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 351–362.

      Part 3. Improvement of the Life of Negro Children and Youth in the American Social Order

      Gibbons, I. L. (1950). Character building agencies and the needs of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 363–371.

      Lindsay, I. B., & Ware, C. F. (1950). Welfare agencies and the needs of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 372–383.

      Brown, I. C. (1950). The role of education in preparing children and youth to live in a multiracial society. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 384–387.

      Daniel, W. G. (1950). The responsibility of education for the preparation of children and youth to live in a multi-racial society. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 388–398.

      Goodman, M. E. (1950). The education of children and youth to live in a multi-racial society. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 399–407.

      Bond, H. M. (1950). Improving the morale of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 408–411.

      Long, H. H. (1950). Improving the morale of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 412–419.

      Mays, B. E. (1950). Improving the morale of Negro children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 420–425.

      Volume 19Fall 1950Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1950). Southern intransigence and the Sweatt and McLaurin decisions. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 427–430.

      Editorial

      Bunche, R. J. (1950). Democracy: A world issue. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 431–438.

      Parker, G. G. (1950). A summary of British native policy in Kenya and Uganda, 1885–1939. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 439–448.

      Perry, S. P., Jr. (1950). India's second year of independence. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 449–458.

      Cox, O. C. (1950). The new crisis in leadership among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 459–465.

      Himes, J. S., Jr., & Manley, A. E. (1950). The success of students in a Negro liberal arts college. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 466–473.

      Knox, E. O. (1950). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1949. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 474–482.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1950). Decision of Heman Marion Sweatt v. Theophilis Shickel Painter et al. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 512–515.

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1950). Decision of McLaurin v. University of Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 516–518.

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1950). The University of Delaware decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 519–529.

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1950). Decision of Browne Junior High School P.T.A. v. Board of Education, District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 530–554.

      Lee, M. B. (1950). We train our leaders. The Journal of Negro Education, 19, 555–556.

      Volume 20Winter 1951Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1951). The Southern Association and Negro schools in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 1–7.

      Editorial

      Bayton, J. A., & Bell, E. (1951). An exploratory study of the role of the Negro press. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 8–15.

      Murray, W. I. (1951). The concept of social class and its implications for teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 16–21.

      Morris, J. R. (1951). The social-economic background of Negro youth in California. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 22–31.

      Zeligs, R. (1951). Your child's good-will depends on you. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 32–38.

      Wallace, E. H. (1951). A study of Negro elementary education in North Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 39–49.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1951). A brief history of Mercy-Douglass Hospital in Philadelphia. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 50–66.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Cox, O. C. (1951). Vested interests involved in the integration of schools for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 112–114.

      Cartwright, M. (1951). The Ives-Quinn Bill—Legislative and social background. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 115–118.

      Williams, E. K. (1951). Degrees earned by social science teachers in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 119–121.

      Hawkins, T. E. (1951). A guidance program to aid students to fully appreciate college life. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 122–125.

      Cobb, W. M. (1951). The Negro nurse and the nation's health. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 126–130.

      Matthew, E. S. (1951). Launching a program of in-service professional growth for Jeanes supervisors. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 131–134.

      Volume 20Spring 1951Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1951). Negro teachers and the elimination of segregated schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 135–139.

      Editorial

      Beittel, A. D. (1951). Some effects of the “separate but equal” doctrine of education. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 140–147.

      Walker, D. E. (1951). Some realistic aspects of the progress of Jamaica, 1895–1947. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 148–159.

      Butcher, P. (1951). Creative writing in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 160–163.

      Ireland, R. R. (1951). An exploratory study of minority group membership. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 164–168.

      Smith, P. M. (1951). Head librarians in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 169–173.

      Townes, R. E. (1951). Professional education in physical education in selected Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 174–180.

      Fenderson, L. H. (1951). The Negro press as a social instrument. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 181–188.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Jenkins, M. D. (1951). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1950–51. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 207–222.

      Langhorne, J. L. (1951). The use of audio-visual aids with Negro themes. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 223–227.

      Eaton, J. A. (1951). The effect of the college “atmosphere” on the personality of the student. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 228–232.

      Gill, R. L. (1951). Impressions of a Negro college professor in a mixed university. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 233–236.

      Hargrett, A. J. (1951). Religious attitudes as expressed by students of Savannah State college. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 237–240.

      The appeal of the Louisville Municipal College faculty to the board of trustees (1951). The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 241–248.

      Volume 20Summer 1951Number 3

      The American Negro and Civil Rights in 1950

      Yearbook Number 20

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1951). The American Negro and civil rights in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 249–255.

      Editorial

      Part 1. The International Character of Human Rights

      Benjamin, H. (1951). The United Nations' Human Rights Program. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 256–260.

      Drake, S. C. (1951). The international implications of race and race relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 261–278.

      Part 2. America's Disadvantaged Minorities

      Malin, P. M. (1951). The status of civil rights in the United States in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 279–289.

      Schermerhorn, R. A. (1951). America's disadvantaged minorities: The American Indian. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 290–300.

      McWilliams, C. (1951). America's disadvantaged minorities: Mexican-Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 301–309.

      Forster, A. (1951). America's disadvantaged minorities: The American Jew. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 310–319.

      Rose, A. M., & Rose, C. B. (1951). America's disadvantaged minorities: The American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 320–332.

      Part 3. Some Organized Efforts to Obtain and Protect the Civil Rights of Minorities

      Washington, J. A. (1951). The program of the civil rights section of the Department of Justice. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 333–345.

      Myer, D. S. (1951). The program of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 346–353.

      Cox, O. C. (1951). The programs of Negro civil rights organizations. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 354–366.

      Epstein, H. (1951). The programs of Jewish civil rights organizations. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 367–377.

      Brazeal, B. R. (1951). The present status and programs of fair employment practices commissions—federal, state and municipal. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 378–397.

      Dodson, D. W. (1951). Public intergroup relations agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 398–407.

      Giles, H. H. (1951). The present status and programs of private intergroup relations agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 408–424.

      Part 4. Segregation and the Civil Rights of Negroes

      Konvitz, M. R. (1951). The extent and character of legally enforced segregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 425–435.

      Reid, H. O. (1951). Efforts to eliminate legally enforced segregation through federal, state, and local legislation. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 436–449.

      Browne, V. J. (1951). The elimination of segregation by executive orders and federal administrative policies. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 450–459.

      Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1951). Resort to the courts as a means of eliminating “legalized” segregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 460–474.

      Henderson, E. W. (1951). The elimination of segregation through protest, propaganda and education. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 475–484.

      Part 5. Critical Summary

      Johnson, C. S. (1951). American minorities and civil rights in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 485–493.

      Volume 20Fall 1951Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1951). How imminent is the outlawing of segregation? The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 495–498.

      Editorial

      Lee, M. A. (1951). Nature and the causes of the difficulties of high school pupils in reading and interpreting four kinds of materials. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 499–513.

      Stodola, Q. C. (1951). The teaching of English in secondary schools for Negroes in Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 513–519.

      Groves, H. E. (1951). A re-examination of the “Separate But Equal” doctrine in public education. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 520–534.

      Cobb, H. E. (1951). Salary, rank and tenure practices in thirty-six Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 535–546.

      Kaplan, S. (1951). The Octoroon: Early history of the drama of miscegenation. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 547–557.

      Ireland, R. R. (1951). Auguste Comte's views on slavery. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 558–561.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Greenberg, J. (1951). Racial integration of teachers—A growing problem. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 584–587.

      Cooke, P. (1951). Safeguards for Negro teachers in an integrated school system in Washington, D.C. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 588–590.

      Saundle, J. S. (1951). Along the horizon as one educator sees it. The Journal of Negro Education, 20, 591–595.

      Volume 21Winter 1952Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1952). The courts and racial integration in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 1–7.

      Editorial

      Long, H. H. (1952). Cultural and racial tensions. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 8–19.

      Snowden, F. M., Jr. (1952). The Italian press views America's attitude toward civil rights and the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 20–26.

      Carter, E. M. (1952). College entrance requirements as they are related to life adjustment education in the Negro secondary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 27–37.

      Knox, E. O. (1952). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 38–46.

      Current Trends and Events of National Importance in Negro Education

      Badger, H. G. (1952). Negro colleges and universities: 1900–1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 89–93.

      Porter, D. B. (1952). Maria Louise Baldwin, 1856–1922. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 94–96.

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1952). Decision of Harry Briggs, Jr. et al. v. R. W. Elliott, Chairman et al. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 97–115.

      Loescher, F. S. (1952). How Philadelphia got its FEPC [Fair Employment Practices Commission]. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 116–119.

      Smythe, H. H. (1952). Japanese GARIOA [Government Aid for the Rehabilitation of Individuals in Occupied Areas] scholarship students and Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 120–122.

      Volume 21Spring 1952Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1952). Southern Association abandons “B” class rating for Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 123–124.

      Editorial

      Amos, R. T. (1952). The accuracy of Negro and White children's predictions of teachers' attitudes toward Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 125–135.

      Pittman, J. A. (1952). A study of the suitability of an attitude-gauging instrument for assaying the attitude-toward-schooling of a group of sixth-grade Negro pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 136–147.

      Nesbitt, G. B. (1952). The Negro race relations expert and Negro community leadership. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 148–160.

      Neal, E. E. (1952). Two Negro problems instead of one: A challenge to Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 161–166.

      Robinson, W. H. (1952). The Negro college faces the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 167–172.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Jenkins, M. D. (1952). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1950–51. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 205–219.

      Weatherford, A. E., II. (1952). The status of graduate offerings in health education, physical education, and recreation education in Negro colleges and universities, 1950–51. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 220–223.

      Lloyd, R. G. (1952). Practices of American Negro colleges and universities regarding graduate training of faculty members within the employing institution. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 224–225.

      Couch, W., Jr. (1952). Rural education in Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 226–228.

      Volume 21Summer 1952Number 3

      Proceedings of the National Conference on “The Courts and Racial Integration in Education”

      Yearbook Number 21

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1952). The courts and racial integration in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 229–230.

      Editorial

      I. The Present Status of and Future Outlook for Racial Integration in Education in the United States

      Johnson, M. W. (1952). Welcome address and explanation of the general purposes of the conference. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 233–241.

      Bond, H. M. (1952). The present status of racial integration in the United States, with especial reference to education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 241–250.

      Ashmore, H. S. (1952). Racial integration, with special reference to education in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 250–255.

      II. Some Problems Incident to Racial Integration in the Public Schools

      Ming, W. R., Jr. (1952). The elimination of segregation in the public schools of the North and West. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 265–275.

      Bustard, J. L. (1952). The New Jersey story: The development of racially integrated public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 275–285.

      Miller, W. I. (1952). Anticipated problems incident to racial integration in public schools and some suggested approaches. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 285–292.

      III. Court Action as a Means of Achieving Racial Integration in Education

      Frank, J. P. (1952). Can the courts erase the color line? The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 304–316.

      Marshall, T. (1952). An evaluation of recent efforts to achieve racial integration in education through resort to the courts. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 316–327.

      IV. Some Tactics Which Should Supplement Resort to the Courts in Achieving Racial Integration in Education

      White, W. (1952). Some tactics which should supplement resort to the courts in achieving racial integration in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 340–344.

      Granger, L. B. (1952). Some tactics which should supplement resort to the courts in achieving racial integration in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 344–349.

      V. Problems Incident to Racial Integration in Higher Education

      Mays, B. E. (1952). The present status of and future outlook for racial integration in the church related White colleges in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 350–352.

      Atwood, R. B. (1952). The public Negro college in a racially integrated system of higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 352–363.

      Patterson, F. D. (1952). The private Negro college in a racially integrated system of higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 363–369.

      VI. Court Action and Other Means of Achieving Racial Integration in Education

      Court action and other means of achieving racial integration in education. (1952). The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 383–410.

      VII. The Courts and Racial Integration in Education—A Critical Summary

      Jenkins, M. D. (1952). Problems incident to racial integration and some suggested approaches to these problems—A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 411–421.

      Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1952). An appraisal of court action as a means of achieving racial segregation in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 421–430.

      Lafarge, J. S. J. (1952). The development of cooperative acceptance of racial integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 430–433.

      Thompson, C. H., Prattis, P. L., Dent, A. W., Horne, F. C., & Johnson, M. W. (1952). Discussion of papers and closing remarks. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 434–444.

      Volume 21Fall 1952Number 4

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1952). Some issues in the segregated school cases. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 445–447.

      Editorial

      Nicholson, L. E. (1952). The Urban League and the vocational guidance and adjustment of Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 448–458.

      Gorham, T. T. (1952). Negro newsmen and practices of pressure groups in the Middle West. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 459–468.

      Hoyt, E. E. (1952). Higher education in British East Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 469–477.

      Brown, W. H. (1952). Financial support of secondary education for Negroes in Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 478–483.

      Knox, E. O. (1952). The Negro as a subject of university research in 1951. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 484–491.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Seitz, C. J. (1952). The decision in the Wilmington, Delaware case. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 513–521.

      Huxman, W. A., Mellott, A. J., & Hill, D. C. (1952). The Topeka, Kansas case decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 522–527.

      Dobie, A. M., Hutcheson, S., & Bryan, A. V. (1952). The Prince Edward County, Virginia case decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 528–531.

      Smythe, M. M. (1952). A broader base for Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 532–534.

      Powell, A. S. (1952). Group identity and book interests of college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 535–540.

      Rinder, I. D. (1952). Some observations on the “rank order of discriminations” hypothesis. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 541–545.

      Gibbs, W. T. (1952). Engineering education in Negro land grant colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 21, 546–550.

      Volume 22Winter 1953Number 1

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1953). The Supreme Court examines “separate but equal” schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Murray, P. (1953). The historical development of race laws in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 4–15.

      Lee, J. O. (1953). Racial inclusion in church-related colleges in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 16–25.

      Jans, R. T. (1953). Racial integration at Berea College, 1950–1952. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 26–37.

      Jones, L. W. (1953). The South's Negro farm agent. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 38–45.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Carter, R. L. (1953). The effects of segregation and the consequences of desegregation: A social science statement (1953). The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 68–76.

      Rand, E. W. (1953). The Negro private and church college at mid-century. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 77–79.

      Payne, J. A., Jr. (1953). The role of the Negro college in the light of integrative trends. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 80–83.

      Walker, G. H., Jr. (1953). The English Proficiency Test in fifteen Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 84–87.

      Hargrett, A. J. (1953). The teaching of religion in state colleges for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 88–90.

      Ferguson, I. L. (1953). Modernizing health education in tuberculosis among Negroes in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 91–94.

      Volume 22Spring 1953Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1953). The Negro teacher and the desegregation of the public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 95–101.

      Editorial

      Crane, R. I. (1953). The development of educational facilities in the non-self-governing territories. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 102–114.

      Waters, E. W. (1953). Problems of rural Negro high school seniors on the eastern shore of Maryland: A consideration for guidance. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 115–125.

      Sisk, G. N. (1953). Negro education in the Alabama Black Belt, 1875–1900. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 126–135.

      Allman, R. W. (1953). A study of selected competencies of prospective teachers in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 136–144.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Jenkins, M. D. (1953). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1952–53. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 188–200.

      Lloyd, R. G. (1953). Retirement and annuity plans in Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 201–204.

      Barnett, A. E. (1953). Youth and racial unity through educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 205–207.

      Marshall, J. W. (1953). The dilemma of southern youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 208–211.

      Long, H. H. (1953). Integration in education: A look forward. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 212–215.

      Neal, E. E. (1953). The education of the southern Negro in a changing economy. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 216–220.

      Volume 22Summer 1953Number 3

      The Relative Status of the Negro Population in the United States

      Yearbook Number 22

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1953). The relative status of the Negro population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 221–231.

      Editorial

      Burgess, R. W. (1953). Census data: Summary of types available, limitations, and possibility of extension. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 232–241.

      Valien, P. (1953). The growth and distribution of the Negro population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 242–249.

      Lorimer, F. (1953). The demographic characteristics of the Negro population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 250–254.

      Siegel, J. S. (1953). Natality, mortality, and growth prospects of the Negro population of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 255–279.

      Edwards, G. F. (1953). Marital status and general family characteristics of the non-White population of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 280–296.

      Bailer, L. H. (1953). The Negro in the labor force of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 297–306.

      Hope, J., II. (1953). The employment of Negroes in the United States by major occupation and industry. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 307–321.

      Jones, L. W. (1953). The Negro farmer. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 322–332.

      Mitchell, G. S. (1953). Money income of Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 333–342.

      Weaver, R. C. (1953). The relative status of the housing of Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 343–354.

      Sheldon, H. D. (1953). A comparative study of the non-White and White institutional population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 355–362.

      Martin, R. E. (1953). The relative political status of the Negro in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 363–379.

      Reddick, L. D. (1953). The relative status of the Negro in the American armed forces. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 380–387.

      Miller, C. L. (1953). The relative educational attainment of the Negro population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 388–404.

      Houchins, J. R. (1953). The Negro in professional occupations in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 405–415.

      DeCosta, F. A. (1953). The relative enrollment of Negroes in the common schools in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 416–431.

      Thompson, C. H. (1953). The relative enrollment of Negroes in higher educational institutions in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 432–441.

      Reid, I. D. A. (1953). The relative status of the Negro in the United States—A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 442–451.

      Volume 22Fall 1953Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1953). Reargument of the educational segregation cases. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 453–454.

      Editorial

      Roberts, H. W. (1953). Prior-service attitudes toward Whites of 219 Negro veterans. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 455–465.

      Luchterhand, E., & Kent, D. P. (1953). Relieving dysphoric reactions of students to minorities courses. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 466–470.

      Harrison, E. C. (1953). A study of occupational attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 471–475.

      Chick, C. A., Sr. (1953). Recent southern industrialization and its implications for Negroes living in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 476–483.

      Scott, J. I. E., & Scott, H. R. (1953). Foreign students in Negro colleges and universities in the United States of America, 1951–1952. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 484–492.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Cartwright, M. (1953). Chinese stereotype. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 518–521.

      Burr, S. E., Jr. (1953). The progress of racial integration in the public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 522–526.

      Weatherford, A. E., II. (1953). Professional health, physical education, and recreation education in Negro colleges 1948–1949. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 527–533.

      Zeligs, R. (1953). Children explain their intergroup attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 22, 534–548.

      Volume 23Winter 1954Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1954). The impending Court decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 1–2.

      Editorial

      Cooke, P. (1954). The Negro teacher in the Washington, D.C. integrated school system. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 3–8.

      Parker, M. H. (1954). Some educational activities of the Freedmen's Bureau. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 9–21.

      Templeton, F. L. (1954). The admission of Negro boys to the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute “A” course. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 22–29.

      Bradley, G. H. (1954). Education in Africa—The problem of the twentieth century. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 30–39.

      Miller, K. C. (1954). Modern foreign languages in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 40–50.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Moran, R. E. (1954). Education for Negroes in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 82–84.

      Templeton, F. L. (1954). An integrated parent-teacher association organization. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 85–87.

      Hamilton, C. E. (1954). Problems of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 88–91.

      Troup, C. V. (1954). Building construction on Negro college campuses. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 92–96.

      Frumkin, R. M. (1954). Race and major mental disorders: A research note. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 97–98.

      Rice, P. (1954). A legislative attack on educational discrimination. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 99–101.

      Volume 23Spring 1954Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1954). After the U.S. Supreme Court decision—what? The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 107–108.

      Editorial

      Fishel, L. H., Jr. (1954). Can segregated schools be abolished? The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 109–116.

      Moore, P. L. (1954). Factors involved in student elimination from high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 117–122.

      Pittman, J. A. (1954). A study of the prediction of academic achievement in publicly supported colleges for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 123–132.

      Wilkinson, R. D. (1954). Goals for alumni relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 133–138.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1954). Enrollment in institutions of higher education of Negroes, 1953–1954. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 139–151.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Hofmann, H. (1954). Illegitimate Negro children in German elementary schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 180–182.

      Powell, A. S. (1954). Reading interests of 366 college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 183–185.

      Wattenberg, W. W. (1954). Factors linked to race among boys in trouble with Detroit police, 1948. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 186–189.

      Morris, J. R. (1954). The equality of educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 190–192.

      Condell, J. F. (1954). The Negro patient and professional worker in the state-supported southern mental hospitals. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 193–196.

      Frumkin, R. M., & Brandyburg, M. S. (1954). Expected versus actual social behavior of Negro adolescent girls in a southern rural community. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 197–200.

      Volume 23Summer 1954Number 3

      Next Steps in Racial Desegregation

      Yearbook Number 23

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1954). Next steps in racial desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 201–202.

      Part 1. An Evaluation of Recent Experience in Desegregation Section A: Nonschool Desegregation

      Mitchell, C. (1954). The status of racial integration in the armed forces. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 203–213.

      Long, H. H. (1954). Racial desegregation in railroad and bus transportation. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 214–221.

      Clement, R. E. (1954). Racial integration in the field of sports. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 222–230.

      Lee, J. O. (1954). The status of racial integration in religious institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 231–241.

      Browne, V. J. (1954). Racial desegregation in the public service, with particular reference to the U.S. government. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 242–248.

      Rabkin, S. (1954). Racial desegregation in places of public accommodation. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 249–261.

      Hope, J., II. (1954). Efforts to eliminate racial discrimination in industry, with particular reference to the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 262–272.

      Osborne, I. (1954). Toward racial integration in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 273–281.

      Section B: Desegregation in Education—Case Studies

      Wright, M. T. (1954). Racial integration in the public schools of New Jersey. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 282–289.

      Knox, E. O. (1954). Racial integration in the schools of Arizona, Kansas, and New Mexico. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 290–295.

      Culver, D. W. (1954). Racial desegregation in education in Indiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 296–302.

      Valien, B. H. (1954). Racial desegregation of the public schools in southern Illinois. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 303–309.

      Plaut, R. L. (1954). Racial integration in higher education in the North. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 310–316.

      Johnson, G. B. (1954). Racial integration in public higher education in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 317–329.

      Shagaloff, J. (1954). A study of community acceptance of desegregation in two selected areas. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 330–338.

      Clark, K. B. (1954). Some principles related to the problem of desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 339–347.

      Reid, I. D. A. (1954). Integration: Ideal, process, and situation. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 348–354.

      Part 2. Next Steps in Racial Desegregation in Education

      Indritz, P. (1954). The meaning of the school decisions: The break-through on the legal front of racial segregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 355–363.

      Johnson, C. S. (1954). Some significant social and educational implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 364–371.

      Walker, H. J. (1954). Some basic factors involved in the development of community acceptance of desegregated schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 372–383.

      Mitchell, G. S. (1954). Next steps in racial desegregation in education in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 384–389.

      Granger, L. B. (1954). Some suggested next steps in furtherance of racial desegregation in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 390–399.

      Volume 23Fall 1954Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1954). Between court decision and decree. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 401–405.

      Editorial

      Valien, P., & Horton, C. (1954). Some demographic characteristics of outstanding Negro women. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 406–420.

      Lloyd, R. G., & Walker, G. H. (1954). Teacher supply and demand in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 421–427.

      Clift, V. A. (1954). Needed changes in higher education for the decades ahead. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 428–435.

      Brazeal, B. R. (1954). Some processes of strengthening civil rights. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 436–442.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Matheson, A. (1954). Overcoming tribal prejudices against educating girls in Kenya. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 481–482.

      Cooke, P. (1954). Problems of school integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 483–486.

      Wilkins, W. D. (1954). A college education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 487–491.

      Frumkin, R. M. (1954). Race, occupation, and social class in Ohio. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 492–495.

      Deutsch, M. E. (1954). Equality in life as well as in death. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 496–501.

      Waters, E. W. (1954). Vocational aspirations, intelligence, problems and socio-economic status of rural Negro high school seniors on the eastern shore of Maryland, their implications for vocational guidance. The Journal of Negro Education, 23, 502–505.

      Volume 24Winter 1955Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1955). Recent briefs submitted in the segregation cases. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 1–5.

      Editorial

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1955). Cooperative fund raising for higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 6–15.

      Williams, C. (1955). Some current problems in African education. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 16–25.

      Doddy, H. H., & Edwards, G. F. (1955). Apprehensions of Negro teachers concerning desegregation in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 26–43.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Stanley, E. (1955). Educational desegregation in Baltimore: A status report. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 71–77.

      Osborne, I. (1955). Desegregation of Washington schools: The first sixty days. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 78–86.

      Daves, J. H. (1955). TVA [Tennessee Valley Authority] and Negro employment. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 87–90.

      Volume 24Spring 1955Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1955). Some significant by-products of the May 17th decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 91–92.

      Editorial

      Patterson, F. D. (1955). Education in Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 93–105.

      Record, W. (1955). Negro intellectuals and Negro movements: Some methodological notes. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 106–112.

      Browne, V. J. (1955). Economic development in Liberia. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 113–119.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Parker, J. W. (1955). The status of debate in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 146–153.

      Lovell, J., Jr. (1955). The ways of racial art. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 154–156.

      Logan, R. W. (1955). The birth of African nations. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 157–160.

      Volume 24Summer 1955Number 3

      The Desegregation Decision—One Year Afterward

      Yearbook Number 24

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1955). The desegregation decision—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 161–164.

      Editorial

      Jones, L. W. (1955). Desegregation of education in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 165–171.

      Stephan, A. S. (1955). Introduction and segregation in Arkansas—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 172–187.

      Shagaloff, J. (1955). Desegregation of public schools in Delaware. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 188–204.

      Cooke, P. (1955). Present status of integration in the public schools of the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 205–218.

      Puryear, R. W. (1955). Desegregation of public education in Florida—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 219–227.

      Johnson, R. O. (1955). Desegregation of public education in Georgia—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 228–247.

      Coleman, A. L. (1955). Desegregation of public schools in Kentucky—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 248–257.

      Taylor, J. T. (1955). Desegregation in Louisiana—One year after. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 258–274.

      Grant, G. C. (1955). Desegregation in Maryland since the Supreme Court decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 275–286.

      Bender, W. A. (1955). Desegregation in the public schools of Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 287–292.

      Brantley, G. D. (1955). Present status of integration in the public schools of Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 293–309.

      Harris, N. H. (1955). The implementation of the desegregation decision in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 310–317.

      Perry, T. D. (1955). Desegregation of public education in Oklahoma—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 318–326.

      Solomon, W. E. (1955). Desegregation in public education in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 327–332.

      Redd, G. N. (1955). Educational desegregation in Tennessee—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 333–347.

      Jones, W. H. (1955). Desegregation of public education in Texas—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 348–360.

      Picott, J. R. (1955). Desegregation of public education in Virginia—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 361–370.

      Jordan, L. V. (1955). Educational integration in West Virginia—One year afterward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 371–381.

      Parrish, C. H. (1955). Desegregation in public education—A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 382–387.

      Valien, P. (1955). The desegregation decision—One year afterward—A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 388–396.

      Carter, R. L., & Marshall, T. (1955). The meaning and significance of the Supreme Court decree. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 397–404.

      Volume 24Fall 1955Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Doddy, H. H. (1955). Desegregation and the employment of Negro teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 405–408.

      Editorial

      Rauch, J. S. (1955). Area institute programs and African studies. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 409–425.

      Eells, W. C. (1955). Higher education of Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 426–434.

      Boykin, L. L. (1955). The reading performance of some Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 435–461.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      McCulloch, M. C. (1955). Facing forward: An open letter to the colleges in the United Negro College Fund in reply to their message to contributors of November 22, 1954. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 493–497.

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1955). A reply to facing forward. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 498–500.

      Decker, P. (1955). A study of “White” teachers in selected “Negro” colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 501–505.

      Frumkin, R. M. (1955). Race of men serving life sentences in the Ohio State Penitentiary: A research note. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 506–508.

      Robinson, W. A. (1955). Libraries of integrated schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 24, 509–514.

      Volume 25Winter 1956Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1956). The twenty-fifth volume of The Journal of Negro Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Nesbitt, G. B. (1956). Non-White residential dispersion and desegregation in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 4–14.

      Lindsay, I. B. (1956). Some contributions of Negroes to welfare services, 1865–1900. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 15–24.

      Capps, M. P. (1956). The Virginia Out-of-State Graduate Aid Program, 1936–1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 25–35.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Grossack, M. M. (1956). Psychological effects of segregation on buses. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 71–74.

      Bayton, J. A., McAlister, L. B., & Hamer, J. (1956). Race-class stereotypes. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 75–78.

      Rand, E. W. (1956). Selection of board members in Negro church-related colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 79–82.

      Lloyd, R. G. (1956). Some problems of graduate schools operated primarily for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 83–86.

      Kolaja, J., & Buford, L. (1956). Some contributions in the roles of teachers of languages and social sciences. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 87–90.

      Volume 25Spring 1956Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1956). Some lessons of history and common sense. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 91–94.

      Editorial

      Franklin, J. H. (1956). Desegregation—The South's newest dilemma. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 95–100.

      Weaver, R. C. (1956). Some basic issues in desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 101–108.

      Reid, H. O. (1956). The Supreme Court decision and interposition. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 109–117.

      Weaver, E. K. (1956). Development of science curricula in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 118–129.

      Evans, J. C., & Parker, A. J. (1956). ROTC programs and Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 130–138.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Cozart, L. S. (1956). Critical problems in the education of Negroes in the southern region. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 169–174.

      Malzberg, B. (1956). Mental disease among native and foreign-born Negroes in New York State. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 175–181.

      Davis, J. W. (1956). Protecting the Negro teacher. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 182–184.

      Scales, E. E. (1956). Grading practices at Fort Valley State College. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 185–190.

      Sisk, G. (1956). The educational awakening in Alabama and its effect upon the Black Belt, 1900–1917. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 191–196.

      Resolution of the faculty and staff of the South Carolina State College. (1956). The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 197–199.

      The problem of college entrance requirements for the state universities of Florida. (1956). The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 200–202.

      Volume 25Summer 1956Number 3

      Educational Desegregation, 1956

      Yearbook Number 25

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1956). Educational desegregation, 1956. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 203.

      Editorial

      Jones, L. W. (1956). Two years of desegregation in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 205–211.

      Stephan, A. S. (1956). The status of integration and segregation in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 212–220.

      Shagaloff, J. (1956). Public school desegregation in Delaware. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 221–236.

      Cooke, P. (1956). Racial integration in education in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 237–245.

      Porter, G. L. (1956). The status of educational desegregation in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 246–253.

      Coleman, A. L. (1956). Desegregation of the public schools in Kentucky—The second year after the Supreme Court's decision. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 254–261.

      Taylor, J. T. (1956). Desegregation in Louisiana—1956. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 262–272.

      Fleming, G. J. (1956). Racial integration in education in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 273–284.

      Bender, W. A. (1956). The status of educational desegregation in Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 285–288.

      Marshall, A. P. (1956). Racial integration in education in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 289–298.

      Harris, N. H. (1956). Desegregation in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 299–306.

      Perry, T. D., & Hughes, J. H. (1956). Educational desegregation in Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 307–314.

      Solomon, W. E. (1956). The problem of desegregation in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 315–323.

      Redd, G. N. (1956). The status of educational desegregation in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 324–333.

      Jones, W. H. (1956). The status of educational desegregation in Texas. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 334–344.

      Picott, J. R. (1956). The status of educational desegregation in Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 345–351.

      Jordan, L. V. (1956). Racial desegregation in education in West Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 352–358.

      Valien, P. (1956). The status of educational desegregation, 1956: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 359–368.

      Volume 25Fall 1956Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1956). The dilemma of Negro voters. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 369–370.

      Editorial

      Robinson, W. A. (1956). The progress of integration in the Phoenix schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 371–379.

      Annella, S. M. (1956). Some aspects of interracial marriage in Washington, D.C., 1940–47. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 380–391.

      Record, W. (1956). Sociological theory, intra-racial color differentiation and the Garvey movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 392–401.

      Noble, J. L. (1956). Future educational emphasis: Psychological or sociological? The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 402–409.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Berry, C. A., & Jones, A. L. (1956). Factors involved in the withdrawal of students from Grambling College at or before the end of their freshman year. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 445–447.

      Thompson, M. L. (1956). Attitudes of twenty Negro graduate students toward education in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 448–451.

      Smith, A. P., Jr. (1956). The role of teacher-counselor as psychotherapist. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 452–455.

      Brown, A. (1956). The Phelps-Stokes fund and its projects. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 456–462.

      Liles, S. B. (1956). Language arts instruction in the junior high schools in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 25, 463–466.

      Volume 26Winter 1957Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. Desegregation, 1956; prospects, 1957. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Johnson, C. S. (1957). A southern Negro's view of the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 4–9.

      Larsen, C. E. (1957). I am not what I once was. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 10–14.

      Noble, J. L. (1957). Negro women today and their education. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 15–21.

      Stephan, A. S. (1957). Population ratios, racial attitudes, and desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 22–29.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      A Statement by Members of the Bar. (1957). Recent attacks upon the Supreme Court of the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 56–58.

      Ahmed, L. N. (1957). Indian students in America and acceptance of Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 59–62.

      Rosenthal, J. O. (1957). Negro teachers' attitudes toward desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 63–71.

      D'Amico, L. A. (1957). Problem behavior in Negro schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 72–74.

      Boykin, L. L. (1957). The adjustment of 2,078 Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 75–79.

      Mitchell, L. E. (1957). Aspiration levels of Negro delinquent, dependent, and public school boys. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 80–85.

      Ostlund, L. A. (1957). Occupational choice patterns of Negro college women. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 86–91.

      Virginia school desegregation affirmed. (1957). The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 92–96.

      Volume 26Spring 1957Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1957). The Gold Coast revolution. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 97–98.

      Editorial

      English, W. H. (1957). Minority group attitudes of Negroes and implications for guidance. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 99–107.

      Amerman, H. E. (1957). Perspective for evaluating intergroup relations in a public school system. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 108–120.

      Long, H. H. (1957). The relative learning capacities of Negroes and Whites. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 121–134.

      Shannon, L. W. (1957). A re-examination of the concept “capacity for self-government.” The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 135–144.

      Jefferson, R. B. (1957). Some obstacles to racial integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 145–154.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Bardolph, R. (1957). Negro religious and educational leaders in Who's Who in America, 1936–1955. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 182–192.

      Boykin, L. L. (1957). Trends in American higher education with implications for the higher education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 193–199.

      Bradley, G. H. (1957). Teacher education and desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 200–203.

      Williams, L. A. (1957). The interracial conference of the National Council of Negro Women. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 204–206.

      Rand, E. W. (1957). The cost of board, room and student fees in a selected group of Negro publicly supported colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 207–211.

      Volume 26Summer 1957Number 3

      The Negro Voter in the South

      Yearbook Number 26

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1957). The Negro voter in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 213–218.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Introduction

      Moon, H. L. (1957). The Negro vote in the presidential election of 1956. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 219–230.

      Section 2. Historical Background

      Woodward, C. V. (1957). The political legacy of reconstruction. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 231–240.

      Franklin, J. H. (1957). “Legal” disfranchisement of the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 241–248.

      Marshall, T. (1957). The rise and collapse of the “White democratic primary.” The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 249–254.

      Weaver, R. C., & Gabel, H. W. (1957). Some legislative consequences of Negro disfranchisement. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 255–261.

      Section 3. The Negro Voter Outside of the South

      Miller, L. (1957). The Negro voter in the far West. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 262–272.

      Kesselman, L. C. (1957). Negro voting in a border community: Louisville, Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 273–280.

      Section 4. The Negro Voter in the South

      Gomillion, C. G. (1957). The Negro voter in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 281–286.

      Cothran, T. C., & Phillips, W. M., Jr. (1957). Expansion of Negro suffrage in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 287–296.

      Roady, E. E. (1957). The expansion of Negro suffrage in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 297–306.

      Bacote, C. A. (1957). The Negro voter in Georgia politics, today. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 307–318.

      Fenton, J. H. (1957). The Negro voter in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 319–328.

      Lewis, E. M. (1957). The Negro voter in Mississippi. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 329–350.

      Newton, I. G. (1957). Expansion of Negro suffrage in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 351–358.

      McCain, J. T. (1957). The Negro voter in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 359–361.

      Valien, P. (1957). Expansion of Negro suffrage in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 362–368.

      Bullock, H. A. (1957). The expansion of Negro suffrage in Texas. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 369–377.

      McGuin, H. J., & Spraggins, T. L. (1957). Negro politics in Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 378–389.

      Irving, F. B. (1957). The future of the Negro voter in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 390–399.

      Strong, D. S. (1957). The future of the Negro voter in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 400–407.

      Lubell, S. (1957). The future of the Negro voter in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 408–417.

      Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1957). The future of the Negro voter in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 418–423.

      Wilkins, R. (1957). The future of the Negro voter in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 424–431.

      Volume 26Fall 1957Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1957). “The Civil Rights Bill of 1957.” The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 433–434.

      Editorial

      Weinberger, A. D. (1957). A reappraisal of the constitutionality of miscegenation statutes. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 435–446.

      Bell, H. H. (1957). Free Negroes of the North 1830–1835: A study in national cooperation. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 447–455.

      Smuts, R. W. (1957). The Negro community and the development of Negro potential. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 456–465.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1957). W. E. B. Du Bois and the Atlanta University studies on the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 466–476.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Hilliard, R. L. (1957). Desegregation in educational theatre. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 509–513.

      Jackson, E. G. (1957). Some tendencies in demographic trends in Maryland, 1950–1956. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 514–519.

      Chilver, E. M. (1957). Makerere: The University College of East Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 520–524.

      Palmer, R. R. (1957). Colonial statutes and present-day obstacles restricting Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 525–529.

      Miller, K. C. (1957). Take them where you find them. The Journal of Negro Education, 26, 530–531.

      Volume 27Winter 1958Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1958). The Southern Association and Negro college membership. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Pasamanick, B., & Knobloch, H. (1958). The contribution of some organic factors to school retardation in Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 4–9.

      Broderick, F. L. (1958). The academic training of W. E. B. Du Bois. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 10–16.

      Record, W. (1958). Racial integration in California schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 17–23.

      Guild, J. P. (1958). Why choose Virginia? The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 24–33.

      Bell, H. H. (1958). The American Moral Reform Society, 1836–1841. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 34–40.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Frumkin, R. M. (1958). Race, occupation, and social class in New York. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 62–65.

      Blalock, H. M., Jr. (1958). A note on adjusting discrimination rates for per cent non-White. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 66–68.

      Carter, M. E. (1958). Human relations in the course offerings of the District of Columbia Teachers College. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 69–78.

      Brazziel, W. F., Jr. (1958). Meeting the psychosocial crises of Negro youth through a coordinated guidance service. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 79–83.

      Saundle, J. S. (1958). Non-resident students and non-resident fees. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 84–89.

      Howell, E. J. (1958). Student activities in twenty-five high schools in Alabama, 1955–56. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 90–93.

      Haynes, G. E. (1958). Americans look at Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 94–100.

      Volume 27Spring 1958Number 2

      Special Focus: The Role of the Negro College

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1958). The 125th anniversary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 101–102.

      Articles

      Cranford, C. W. (1958). The furnishings of a healthy mind. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 103–106.

      Patterson, F. D. (1958). Colleges for Negro youth and the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 107–114.

      Thurman, H. (1958). The new heaven and the new earth. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 115–119.

      Cobb, W. M. (1958). Not to the swift: Progress and prospects of the Negro in science and the professions. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 120–126.

      Thompson, C. H. (1958). The Negro college: In retrospect and in prospect. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 127–131.

      Manley, A. E. (1958). The role of the Negro college in retrospect and prospect. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 132–135.

      Henderson, T. H. (1958). The role of the Negro college in retrospect and prospect. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 136–140.

      Moron, A. G. (1958). Maintaining the solvency of the private college through efficient management. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 141–144.

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1958). Solvency of the private colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 145–150.

      Hastie, W. H. (1958). Some pains of progress. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 151–158.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Clinard, M. B., & Noel, D. L. (1958). Role behavior of students from Negro colleges in a non-segregated university situation. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 182–188.

      Kiehl, R. (1958). Negro engineers and students report on their profession. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 189–194.

      Cunningham, G. E. (1958). Reasons for belated education: A study of the plight of older Negro teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 195–200.

      Sisk, G. (1958). Morehouse College. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 201–208.

      Volume 27Summer 1958Number 3

      Desegregation and the Negro College

      Yearbook Number 27

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1958). Desegregation and the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 209–211.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Historical Background of the Negro College

      Logan, R. W. (1958). The evolution of private colleges for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 213–220.

      Clark, F. G. (1958). The development and present status of publicly supported higher education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 221–232.

      Brown, A. (1958). Graduate and professional education in Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 233–242.

      Section 2. The Present Status of Desegregation in Higher Education in the South

      Stephan, A. S. (1958). Desegregation of higher education in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 243–252.

      Redding, L. L. (1958). Desegregation in higher education in Delaware. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 253–259.

      Parrish, C. H. (1958). Desegregated higher education in Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 260–268.

      Gandy, S. L. (1958). Desegregation of higher education in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 269–274.

      Fleming, G. J. (1958). Desegregation in higher education in Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 275–283.

      Reedy, S. J. (1958). Higher education and desegregation in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 284–294.

      Harris, N. H. (1958). Desegregation in North Carolina institutions of higher learning. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 295–299.

      Moon, F. D. (1958). Higher education and desegregation in Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 300–310.

      Long, H. H. (1958). The status of desegregated higher education in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 311–317.

      Kirk, W. A., & King, J. Q. T. (1958). Desegregation of higher education in Texas. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 318–323.

      Picott, J. R. (1958). Desegregation of higher education in Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 324–331.

      Jordan, L. V. (1958). Desegregation of higher education in West Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 332–341.

      Cooke, P. (1958). Desegregated higher education in the District of Columbia. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 342–351.

      Brazeal, B. R. (1958). Some problems in the desegregation of higher education in the “hard core” states. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 352–372.

      Valien, P. (1958). Desegregation in higher education: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 373–380.

      Section 3. The Future of the Desegregated Negro College

      Atwood, R. B. (1958). The future of the Negro land-grant college. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 381–391.

      Henderson, T. H. (1958). The future of the non-land-grant Negro public college. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 392–397.

      Trent, W. J., Jr., & Patterson, F. D. (1958). Financial support of the private Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 398–405.

      Wright, S. J. (1958). The future of the Negro private college: Philosophy and program. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 406–413.

      Nabrit, S. M. (1958). Desegregation and the future of graduate and professional education in Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 414–418.

      Jenkins, M. D. (1958). The future of the desegregated Negro college: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 419–429.

      Johnson, G. B. (1958). Desegregation and the future of the Negro college: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 430–435.

      Volume 27Fall 1958Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1958). “With all deliberate speed.” The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 437–439.

      Editorial

      Parsons, H. L. (1958). Integration and the professor. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 439–450.

      Moss, J. A. (1958). Negro teachers in predominantly White colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 451–462.

      Grant, G. C. (1958). An approach to democratizing a phase of college education. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 463–475.

      Williams, L. (1958). The Civil War and intellectuals of the North. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 476–485.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Bond, H. M. (1958). Cat on a hot tin roof. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 519–525.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1958). Du Bois's last year as Crisis editor. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 526–533.

      Payne, J. A., Jr. (1958). The role of the association of colleges and secondary schools for Negroes from 1934 to 1954. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 534–538.

      Hargrett, A. J. (1958). Feelings of depression among students of Savannah State College 1957–1958. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 539–543.

      Blalock, H. M., Jr. (1958). Educational achievement and job opportunities: A vicious circle. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 544–548.

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1958). Opinion of William G. Cooper et al. v. John Aaron et al. The Journal of Negro Education, 27, 549–557.

      Volume 28Winter 1959Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1959). The moral issue in desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 1–2.

      Editorial

      Bond, H. M. (1959). Talent—and toilets. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 3–14.

      Record, W. (1959). Racial diversity in California public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 15–25.

      Pittman, J. A. (1959). The effectiveness of teaching and learning in the fundamentals of English usages. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 26–34.

      Pennington, S., & Mitchell, L. E. (1959). Sex differences in reactions to minority group status. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 35–41.

      Boykin, L. L., & Brazziel, W. F., Jr. (1959). Occupational interests of 1741 teacher education students as revealed on the Lee-Thorpe inventory. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 42–48.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      The Catholic Bishops of the United States. (1959). Discrimination and the Christian conscience. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 66–69.

      Palmer, R. R. (1959). The South and its human relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 70–73.

      Russell, J. W. (1959). Counseling Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 74–75.

      Walker, L. T. (1959). Performance level of Negro teachers of physical education in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 76–80.

      Means, J. H. (1959). Contributions of Negroes to national mathematics magazines. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 81–83.

      Volume 28Spring 1959Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1959). Mr. Huntley's astounding proposal. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 85–91.

      Editorial

      Knoll, E. (1959). The truth about desegregation in the Washington, D.C., public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 92–113.

      Alexis, M. (1959). Pathways to the Negro market. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 114–127.

      Meier, A., & Lewis, D. (1959). History of the Negro upper class in Atlanta, Georgia, 1890–1958. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 128–139.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Virginia's “massive resistance” laws declared unconstitutional. (1959). The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 163–172.

      Cozart, L. S. (1959). Education in a scientific age—Problems and responsibilities. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 173–184.

      Roth, R. M. (1959). A self-selection process by northern Negroes existing in a southern Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 185–186.

      Volume 28Summer 1959Number 3

      Juvenile Delinquency Among Negroes in the United States

      Yearbook Number 28

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1959). Juvenile delinquency among Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 187–190.

      Editorial

      Section 1. The Problem of Juvenile Delinquency in the United States

      Kvaraceus, W. C. (1959). The nature of the problem of juvenile delinquency in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 191–199.

      Teeters, N. K., & Matza, D. (1959). The extent of delinquency in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 200–213.

      Douglass, J. H. (1959). The extent and characteristics of juvenile delinquency among Negroes in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 214–229.

      Section 2. Some Factors Associated With the High Incidence of Juvenile Delinquency Among Negroes

      Cavan, R. S. (1959). Negro family disorganization and juvenile delinquency. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 230–239.

      Clark, K. B. (1959). Color, class, personality and juvenile delinquency. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 240–251.

      Reiss, A. J., Jr., & Rhodes, A. L. (1959). Are educational norms and goals of conforming, truant and delinquent adolescents influenced by group position in American society? The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 252–267.

      Miller, C. L. (1959). Educational level and juvenile delinquency among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 268–276.

      Hill, M. (1959). The metropolis and juvenile delinquency among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 277–285.

      Section 3. Some Types of Agencies Working in the Fields of Prevention and Rehabilitation

      Lohman, J. D. (1959). Juvenile delinquency: A social dimension. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 286–299.

      Thomas, R. C. (1959). Family and child welfare agencies and juvenile delinquency prevention. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 300–309.

      Daniel, W. G. (1959). The role of youth character-building organizations in juvenile delinquency prevention. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 310–316.

      Hypps, I. C. (1959). The role of the school in juvenile delinquency prevention (with especial reference to pupil personnel services). The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 318–328.

      Tufts, E. M. (1959). The role of the Children's Bureau and other federal agencies in juvenile delinquency prevention. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 329–338.

      McCloskey, M. A. (1959). State and municipal youth authorities (or commissions) and their role in juvenile delinquency prevention. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 339–350.

      Robison, S. M. (1959). How effective are current juvenile delinquency preventive programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 351–365.

      Mays, B. E. (1959). The role of the “Negro community” in delinquency prevention among Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 366–370.

      Lewis, H. (1959). Juvenile delinquency among Negroes—A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 371–387.

      Volume 28Fall 1959Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1959). Civil rights in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 389–393.

      Editorial

      Stratmon, D. L. (1959). The Ghana educational system. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 394–403.

      Shack, W. A. (1959). Organization and problems of education in Ethiopia. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 405–420.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1959). Du Bois versus Garvey: Race propagandists at war. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 421–429.

      Glantz, O. (1959). Recent Negro ballots in Philadelphia. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 430–438.

      Stallings, F. H. (1959). A study of the immediate effects of integration on scholastic achievement in the Louisville public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 439–444.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Hamilton, C. V. (1959). The constitutional status of the “Colored youth” provision in state charters for private Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 467–471.

      Robinson, W. H. (1959). Integration's delay and frustration tolerance. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 472–475.

      Rosenstiel, A. (1959). Re-education: An effective approach to the problem of integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 476–479.

      Daniel, W. G. (1959). New perspectives on school desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 28, 480–483.

      Civil Rights Movement Years (1960–1969)
      Volume 29Winter 1960Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1960). Some unfinished business for the 1960s. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 1–6.

      Editorial

      Peters, J. S., II. (1960). A study of the Wechsler-Bellevue verbal scores of Negro and White males. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 7–16.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1960). The Negro school movement in Virginia: From “equalization” to “integration.” The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 17–29.

      Boykin, L. L. (1960). An experiment in reducing the number of over-age pupils in elementary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 30–36.

      Thompson, D. C. (1960). Problems of faculty morale. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 37–46.

      Lane, D. E. (1960). Race relations in American law. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 47–49.

      Daniel, A. M. (1960). The White band. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 49–50.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Rousseve, R. J. (1960). Some aspects of the personality stresses of Negro Americans and several of their implications for teaching. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 70–72.

      Coleman, A. L. (1960). Occupational, educational, and residence plans of Negro high-school seniors in Lexington and Fayette County, Kentucky. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 73–79.

      Spruill, A. W. (1960). The Negro teacher in the process of desegregation of schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 80–84.

      Blalock, H. M., & Blalock, A. B. (1960). Situational factors and Negro leadership activity in a medium-sized community. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 85–90.

      Rich, J. M. (1960). Social pressures and school segregation in a southern town. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 91–92.

      Decker, P. M. (1960). A study of job opportunities in the state of Florida for Negro college graduates. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 93–95.

      Gipson, T. H. (1960). Relationship of teaching aptitude to age, sex and classification of students at Southern University. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 96–99.

      Meier, A. (1960). A scholar discovers the Negro world: Some observations on Richard Bardolph's “The Negro Vanguard.” The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 100–106.

      Volume 29Spring 1960Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1960). Desegregation pushed off dead center. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 107–111.

      Editorial

      Weaver, R. C. (1960). The private Negro colleges and universities—An appraisal. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 113–120.

      Meier, A. (1960). The racial and educational philosophy of Kelly Miller, 1895–1915. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 121–127.

      Goins, A. E., & Meenes, M. (1960). Ethnic and class preferences among college Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 128–133.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1960). Booker T. Washington's relations with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 134–144.

      Clift, V. A. (1960). Does the Dewey philosophy have implications for desegregating the schools? The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 145–154.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Groff, P. J. (1960). The NEA [National Education Association] and school desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 181–186.

      Gould, F., & Kerckhoff, R. K. (1960). Family life education for the biracial community. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 187–190.

      Chick, C. A., Sr. (1960). The West's changing attitude toward Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 191–197.

      Allman, R. W. (1960). An evaluation of the goals of higher education by 294 college seniors of Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 198–203.

      Walker, G. W., Jr., & Hazel, D. W. (1960). Integration in the junior college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 204–206.

      Brazziel, W. F. (1960). Curriculum choice in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 207–209.

      Volume 29Summer 1960Number 3

      The Negro Private and Church-Related College

      Yearbook Number 29

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1960). The Negro private and church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 211–216.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Historical Background and Present Status of the Negro Church-Related College

      Bond, H. M. (1960). The origin and development of the Negro church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 217–226.

      Thompson, C. H. (1960). The present status of the Negro private and church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 227–244.

      Mays, B. E. (1960). The significance of the Negro private and church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 245–251.

      Section 2. The Rationale and Policies of the Religious Denominations Which Support Negro Private Colleges

      Thomas, J. S. (1960). The rationale underlying support of Negro private colleges by the Methodist Church. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 252–259.

      Campbell, E. F. (1960). The policies and rationale governing support of Negro private colleges maintained by the United Presbyterian church in the U.S.A. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 260–263.

      Bottoms, L. W. (1960). The policies and rationale underlying the support of Negro colleges and schools maintained by the Presbyterian church in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 264–273.

      Caution, T. L. (1960). The Protestant Episcopal church: Policies and rationale upon which support of its Negro colleges is predicated. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 274–283.

      Peterson, F. L. (1960). Why the Seventh-Day Adventist church established and maintains a Negro college (and schools for Negroes below college grade). The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 284–288.

      Hotchkiss, W. A. (1960). Congregationalists and Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 289–298.

      Kampschmidt, W. H. (1960). Why the Evangelical Lutheran church established and maintains colleges for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 299–306.

      Dunne, W. (1960). The Roman Catholic church: The rationale and policies underlying the maintenance of higher institutions for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 307–314.

      Coleman, C. D. (1960). The Christian Methodist Episcopal church: The rationale and policies upon which support of its colleges is predicated. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 315–318.

      Greene, S. L., Jr. (1960). The rationale underlying the support of colleges maintained by the African Methodist Episcopal church. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 319–322.

      Eichelberger, J. W. (1960). The African Methodist Episcopal Zion church: The rationale and policies upon which maintenance of its colleges is based. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 323–329.

      Ellison, J. M. (1960). Policies and rationale underlying the support of colleges maintained by the Baptist denomination. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 330–338.

      Section 3. The Improvement of the Negro Private and Church-Related College

      Wright, S. J. (1960). Some critical problems faced by the Negro church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 339–344.

      Foster, L. H., & Prothro, C. E. (1960). Minimum income necessary to maintain a small private college effectively. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 345–355.

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1960). The relative adequacy of sources of income of the Negro church-related colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 356–367.

      Patterson, F. D. (1960). Duplication of facilities and resources of Negro church-related colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 368–376.

      Redd, G. N. (1960). Better utilization of the resources of the Negro church-related college through curriculum revision. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 377–387.

      Daniel, R. P. (1960). Relationship of the Negro public college and the Negro private and church-related college. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 388–393.

      Weaver, R. C. (1960). The Negro private and church-related college: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 394–400.

      Brownlee, F. L. (1960). Heritage and opportunity: The Negro church-related college: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 401–407.

      Volume 29Fall 1960Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1960). Howard University changes leadership. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 409–411.

      Editorial

      Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1960). Howard University looks to the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 412–420.

      Weaver, R. C. (1960). The NAACP today. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 421–425.

      Pittman, J. A. (1960). A study of the academic achievement of 415 college students in relation to remedial courses taken. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 426–437.

      Scales, E. E. (1960). A study of college student retention and withdrawal. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 438–444.

      Vander Zanden, J. W. (1960). Turmoil in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 445–452.

      Record, W. (1960). Human rights, law, and education. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 453–457.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Daniel, W. G. (1960). Some new books on regional and interracial problems. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 490–496.

      Newton, E. S. (1960). Verbal destitution: The pivotal barrier to learning. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 497–499.

      Amos, W. E. (1960). A study of the occupational awareness of a selected group of ninth grade Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 500–503.

      Phillips, W. B. (1960). Counseling Negro pupils: An educational dilemma. The Journal of Negro Education, 29, 504–507.

      Volume 30Winter 1961Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Doddy, H. H. (1961). The “sit-in” demonstrations and the dilemma of the Negro college president. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Henderson, V. W. (1961). The economic imbalance: An inquiry into the economic status of Negroes in the United States, 1935–1960, with implications for Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 4–16.

      Fen, S. (1961). Liberal education for Negroes (as viewed in the general context of American higher education). The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 17–24.

      Stafford, D. K. (1961). Alain Locke: The child, the man, and the people. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 25–34.

      Norman, A. (1961). A new approach to Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 35–40.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Clarke, J. H. (1961). Africa and the American Negro press. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 64–68.

      Bryant, L. C. (1961). Graduate training in Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 69–71.

      Roth, R. M. (1961). The adjustment of Negro college students at Hampton Institute. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 72–74.

      Cooke, P. (1961). Desegregated education in the Middle-South region: Problems and issues. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 75–79.

      Rand, E. W., & Cooper, M. N. (1961). Sophomore college students and the conversion of common fractions, decimals, and percents. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 80–82.

      Volume 30Spring 1961Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Doddy, H. H. (1961). Federal aid to education and the religious controversy. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 83–86.

      Editorial

      Banks, W. R. (1961). Changing attitudes towards the Negro in the United States: The primary causes. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 87–93.

      Thompson, D. C. (1961). The role of the federal courts in the changing status of Negroes since World War II. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 94–101.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1961). Negro police employment in the urban South. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 102–108.

      Hill, H. (1961). Racism within organized labor: A report of five years of the AFL-CIO, 1955–1960. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 109–118.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Foster, L. H. (1961). Race relations in the South, 1960. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 138–149.

      Smith, P. M., Jr. (1961). A critical interpretation of special collections: Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 150–152.

      Stroud, V. C. (1961). Voter registration in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 153–155.

      Clarke, J. H. (1961). Mohammed Ahmed, (The Mahdi) messiah of the Sudan. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 156–162.

      Sherrill, J. P. (1961). A Negro school-master of the 1870s. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 163–172.

      Volume 30Summer 1961Number 3

      African Education South of the Sahara

      Yearbook Number 30

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1961). African education south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 173–179.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Common Problems Involved in the Task of Nation-Building

      Cowan, L. G. (1961). The current political status and significance of Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 180–192.

      Emerson, R. (1961). Crucial problems involved in nation-building in Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 193–205.

      Ajayi, J. F. A. (1961). The place of African history and culture in the process of nationbuilding in Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 206–213.

      Frazier, E. F. (1961). Urbanization and its effects upon the task of nation-building in Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 214–222.

      Franck, T. M. (1961). European communities in Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 223–231.

      Section 2. Some Special Educational Problems in Africa South of the Sahara

      Wodajo, M. (1961). Ethiopia: Some pressing problems and the role of education in their resolution. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 232–240.

      Wheeler, J. H. (1961). Apartheid implemented by education in South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 241–250.

      Lanier, R. O. (1961). The problem of mass education in Liberia. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 251–260.

      Williams, C. (1961). Educational obstacles to Africanization in Ghana, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 261–265.

      Fall, B. B. (1961). Education in the Republic of the Congo. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 266–276.

      Logan, R. W. (1961). Education in former French West and equatorial Africa and Madagascar. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 277–285.

      Parker, F. (1961). Education in the federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 286–293.

      Duffy, J. (1961). Portuguese Africa (Angola and Mozambique): Some crucial problems and the role of education in their resolution. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 294–301.

      Section 3. African Education South of the Sahara—Some Problems of Implementation

      Miller, R. I. (1961). The role of the United Nations in an emerging Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 302–315.

      Young, R. (1961). The stake of the United States in an independent Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 316–323.

      Wilson, F. T. (1961). The future of missionary enterprise in Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 324–333.

      Smyke, R. J. (1961). Problems of teacher supply and demand in Africa south of the Sahara. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 334–342.

      Section 4. Some Major Educational Problems: A Critical Summary

      Bigelow, K. W. (1961). Some major educational problems in Africa south of the Sahara: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 343–357.

      Bond, H. M. (1961). Some major educational problems in Africa south of the Sahara: A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 358–364.

      Volume 30Fall 1961Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1961). The need for more “deliberate speed” in school desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 365–367.

      Editorial

      Hope, J., II. (1961). The Negro college, student protest and the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 368–376.

      Guzman, J. P. (1961). W. E. B. Du Bois—The historian. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 377–385.

      Shannon, L. W. (1961). Undeveloped areas and their influence on personal development. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 386–395.

      Tate, M. (1961). The Sandwich Island missionaries lay the foundation for a system of public instruction in Hawaii. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 396–405.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Rudwick, E. M. (1961). The southern Negro policeman and the White offender. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 426–431.

      Rose, H. M. (1961). The market for Negro educators in colleges and universities outside the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 432–435.

      Brazziel, W. F. (1961). Some dynamics of curriculum choice in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 436–439.

      Wright, E. (1961). The Souls of Black Folk and my larger education. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 440–444.

      Gordon, V. V. (1961). A history of Storer College, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 445–449.

      Record, W. (1961). Counseling and communication. The Journal of Negro Education, 30, 450–454.

      Volume 31Winter 1962Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1962). The relative significance of the Negro population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Brazziel, W. F., & Terrell, M. (1962). An experiment in the development of readiness in a culturally disadvantaged group of first grade children. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 4–7.

      Springer, H. W. (1962). The historical development, hopes and aims of the University College of the West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 8–15.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1962). Race leadership struggle: Background of the Boston Riot of 1903. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 16–24.

      Greene, J. E., Sr. (1962). Disciplinary status of White and Negro high school students in a large southeastern school system. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 25–29.

      Vander Zanden, J. W. (1962). Accommodation to undesired change: The case of the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 30–35.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Graves, J. L. (1962). The social ideas of Marcus Garvey. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 65–74.

      Edmonds, W. S. (1962). Oh, that median score—The bane of Negro pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 75–77.

      Gauntlett, J. H., & McConaughy, J. B. (1962). Some observations on the influence of the income factor on urban Negro voting in South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 78–82.

      Sawyer, B. E. (1962). The baccalaureate origins of the faculties of twenty-one selected colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 83–87.

      Clarke, J. H. (1962). Bambata: Last of the Zulu rebel chiefs. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 88–91.

      Hart, T. A. (1962). Ghana, West Africa as I saw it. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 92–96.

      Selkow, S. (1962). Hawkins, the United States Supreme Court and Justice. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 97–101.

      Wilkins, R. (1962). NAACP reports for 1961. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 102–104.

      Volume 31Spring 1962Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1962). The Southern Association and the predominantly Negro high school and college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 105–107.

      Editorial

      Vontress, C. E. (1962). Patterns of segregation and discrimination: Contributing factors to crime among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 108–116.

      Smith, H. P., & Abramson, M. (1962). Racial and family experience correlates of mobility aspiration. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 117–124.

      Nelson, H. A. (1962). Expressed and unexpressed prejudice against ethnic groups in a college community. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 125–131.

      Greene, J. E., Sr. (1962). A comparison of the “school morale” of White and Negro students in a large southeastern school system. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 132–138.

      Wolfe, D. P. (1962). Curriculum adaptations for the culturally deprived. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 139–151.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Russell, R. D. (1962). Experiences of Negro high school girls with domestic placement agencies. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 172–176.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1962). Race labeling and the press. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 177–181.

      Rousseve, R. J. (1962). Updating guidance and personnel practices. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 182–183.

      Newton, E. S. (1962). The culturally deprived child in our verbal schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 184–187.

      Palmer, R. (1962). The incidence of race in social action. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 188–190.

      Gandy, W. E. (1962). Implications of integration for the southern teacher. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 191–197.

      Dulaney, W. L. (1962). The Negro and the city. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 198–201.

      Daniel, W. C. (1962). Negroes as teaching assistants in some publicly supported universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 202–204.

      Trent, W. J., Jr. (1962). The United Negro College Fund's African Scholarship Program. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 205–209.

      U.S. Supreme Court. (1962). Decision of Bailey v. Patterson. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 210–211.

      Wilkins, T. B. (1962). Ambrose Caliver: Distinguished civil servant. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 212–214.

      Volume 31Summer 1962Number 3

      The Negro Public College

      Yearbook Number 31

      Editorial Note

      Thompson, C. H. (1962). The Negro public college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 215–220.

      Editorial

      Section 1. The Historical Background of the Public College Movement in the United States

      Eells, W. C., & Hollis, E. V. (1962). Origin and development of the public college in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 221–229.

      Richter, J. (1962). The origin and development of the land-grant college in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 230–239.

      Atwood, R. B. (1962). The origin and development of the Negro public college, with especial reference to the land-grant college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 240–250.

      Section 2. The Present Status of the Negro Publicly Supported College

      Curtis, L. S. (1962). The Negro publicly supported college in Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 251–259.

      Fleming, G. J. (1962). The Negro publicly supported colleges in Delaware and Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 260–274.

      Picott, J. R. (1962). The Negro public college in Virginia. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 275–283.

      Harris, N. H. (1962). Publicly supported Negro higher institutions of learning in North Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 284–292.

      Porter, G. L. (1962). Negro publicly supported higher institutions in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 293–298.

      Blake, E. (1962). The Negro public college in Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 299–309.

      Russell, R. D. (1962). Negro publicly supported colleges in Mississippi and South Carolina. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 310–321.

      Moon, F. D. (1962). The Negro public college in Kentucky and Oklahoma. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 322–329.

      Boykin, L. L. (1962). Negro publicly supported higher institutions in Louisiana. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 330–340.

      Long, H. H. (1962). The Negro public college in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 341–348.

      McDaniel, V. (1962). Negro publicly supported higher institutions in Texas. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 349–353.

      Jones, G. W. (1962). The Negro public colleges in Alabama. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 354–361.

      Stephan, A. S. (1962). The Negro public college in Arkansas. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 362–369.

      Section 3. The Present Status and Future Role of the Negro Public College

      Doddy, H. H. (1962). The status of the Negro public college: A statistical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 370–385.

      Miller, C. L. (1962). The Negro publicly supported junior college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 386–395.

      Martin, W. H. (1962). The land-grant functions of the Negro public college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 396–403.

      Daniel, W. G. (1962). Liberal arts and teacher education in the Negro public college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 404–413.

      Reddick, L. D. (1962). Critical review: The politics of desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 414–420.

      Davis, J. W. (1962). The future of the Negro public college. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 421–428.

      Volume 31Fall 1962Number 4

      Editorial

      Davis, A. P. (1962). E. Franklin Frazier (1894–1962): A profile. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 429–435.

      Sigel, R. S. (1962). Race and religion as factors in the Kennedy victory in Detroit, 1960. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 436–447.

      Simms, D. M. (1962). Ethnic tensions in the “inner-city” church. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 448–454.

      Taylor, D. A. (1962). The relationship between authoritarianism and ethnocentrism in Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 455–459.

      Richardson, J. M. (1962). The Freedmen's Bureau and Negro education in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 460–467.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Harrison, L. J. (1962). The status of the Negro CPA in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 503–506.

      Bokelman, W. R., & D'Amico, L. A. (1962). Changes in faculty salaries and basic student charges in Negro colleges: 1960–61 and 1961–62. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 507–510.

      McGavern, J., & Stafford, D. K. (1962). TN [Token Negro]: A modest proposal for educators. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 511–514.

      Williams, L. A. (1962). The acceptance of the Civil War by northern intellectuals. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 515–520.

      Claye, C. M. (1962). Leadership behavior among Negro school principals. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 521–526.

      Clarke, J. H. (1962). The morning train to Ibadan. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 527–530.

      Chick, C. A., Sr. (1962). The American Negroes' changing attitude toward Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 531–535.

      O'Brien, H. R. (1962). Medical education in tropical Africa progresses. The Journal of Negro Education, 31, 536–541.

      Volume 32Winter 1963Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1963). The centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 1–5.

      Editorial

      O'Brien, K. B., Jr. (1963). The Cuban Educational Association: An early experiment in international education. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 6–15.

      Osofsky, G. (1963). Race riot, 1900: A study of ethnic violence. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 16–24.

      Bragg, E. W. (1963). Changes and challenges in the 60s. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 25–34.

      Palley, H. A. (1963). The migrant labor problem—Its state and interstate aspects. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 35–42.

      Groff, P. J. (1963). The abolitionist movement in high school texts. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 43–51.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Kornberg, L. (1963). Slum children and new teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 74–80.

      Green, G. C. (1963). Negro dialect, the last barrier to integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 81–83.

      McConnell, R. C. (1963). A small college and the archival record. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 84–86.

      Fen, S. (1963). The learning of social relations in school. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 87–91.

      Millard, T. L. (1963). The Negro and social protest. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 92–98.

      Volume 32Spring 1963Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1963). The president's message on civil rights and the progress of the American Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 99–106.

      Editorial

      Brazziel, W. F., & Gordon, M. (1963). Replications of some aspects of the Higher Horizons Program in a southern junior high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 107–113.

      Rousseve, R. J. (1963). Teachers of culturally disadvantaged American youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 114–121.

      Butts, H. F. (1963). Skin color perception and self-esteem. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 122–128.

      Lombardi, D. N. (1963). Factors affecting changes in attitudes toward Negroes among high school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 129–136.

      Singleton, R., & Bullock, P. (1963). Some problems in minority-group education in the Los Angeles public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 137–145.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Bolden, W. S. (1963). Tasks for the Negro teacher in improving academic achievement of Negro pupils in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 173–178.

      Smith, P. M., Jr. (1963). A descriptive self-concept of high school counselors. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 179–182.

      Brown, C. I. (1963). The married student at Bennett College. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 183–187.

      Bryant, L. C. (1963). A study of music programs in public Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 188–192.

      Sawyer, B. E. (1963). The graduate training of twenty-one selected college faculties. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 193–197.

      Porter, D. B. (1963). First International Congress of Africanists. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 198–204.

      Volume 32Summer 1963Number 3

      Editorial Comment

      Thompson, C. H. (1963). A valedictory note. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 205–207.

      Editorial

      Morgan, G. D. (1963). Exploratory study of problems of academic adjustment of Nigerian students in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 208–217.

      Mays, N. (1963). Behavioral expectations of Negro and White teachers on recently desegregated public school faculties. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 218–226.

      Walker, J. L. (1963). The functions of disunity: Negro leadership in a southern city. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 227–236.

      Vontress, C. E. (1963). The Negro against himself. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 237–242.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Shannon, L. W. (1963). The public's perception of social welfare agencies and organizations in an industrial community. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 276–285.

      Oppenheimer, M. (1963). Institutions of higher learning and the 1960 sit-ins: Some clues for social action. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 286–288.

      Arnez, N. L. (1963). A study of attitudes of Negro teachers and pupils toward their school. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 289–293.

      Barker, G. H., & Adams, W. T. (1963). Negro delinquents in public training schools in the West. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 294–300.

      Harrison, E. C. (1963). Working at improving the motivational and achievement levels of the deprived. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 301–307.

      Daniel, W. G. (1963). A tribute to Marion Thompson Wright. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 308–310.

      Volume 32Fall 1963Number 4

      The Relative Progress of the American Negro Since 1950

      Yearbook Number 32

      Editorial Note

      Daniel, W. G. (1963). The relative progress of the American Negro since 1950. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 311–319.

      Editorial

      Section 1. The Progress of the Negro after a Century of Emancipation

      Logan, R. W. (1963). The progress of the Negro after a century of emancipation. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 320–328.

      Section 2. General Characteristics of the Negro Population—1960

      Valien, P. (1963). General demographic characteristics of the Negro population in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 329–336.

      Goldstein, M. S. (1963). Longevity and health status of the Negro American. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 337–348.

      Section 3. Economic Status and Advancement

      Daniel, W. G. (1963). The relative employment and income of American Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 349–357.

      Amos, W. E., & Perry, J. (1963). Negro youth and employment opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 358–366.

      Hope, J., II, & Shelton, E. E. (1963). The Negro in the federal government. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 367–374.

      Marshall, R. (1963). The Negro and organized labor. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 375–389.

      Young, H. B. (1963). Negro participation in American business. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 390–401.

      Section 4. Progress in the Attainment of Equal Civil Rights, Especially in Housing and Political Life

      Yankauer, M. P., & Sunderhauf, M. B. (1963). Housing: Equal opportunity to choose where one shall live. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 402–414.

      Gosnell, H. F., & Martin, R. E. (1963). The Negro as voter and officeholder. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 415–425.

      Thompson, D. C. (1963). Civil rights leadership (An opinion study). The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 426–436.

      Meier, A. (1963). Negro protest movements and organizations. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 437–450.

      Section 5. Social and Educational Development

      Edwards, G. F. (1963). Marriage and family life among Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 451–465.

      Newton, E. S., & West, E. H. (1963). The progress of the Negro in elementary and secondary education. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 466–484.

      Doddy, H. H. (1963). The progress of the Negro in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 485–492.

      Section 6. The Relative Progress and the Future of the Negro in the United States

      Pettigrew, T. F. (1963). Actual gains and psychological losses: The Negro American protest. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 493–506.

      Nabrit, J. M., Jr. (1963). Critical summary and evaluation. The Journal of Negro Education, 32, 507–516.

      Volume 33Winter 1964Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1964). The time is now: Some educational imperatives for 1964. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 1–5.

      Editorial

      Pettigrew, T. F. (1964). Negro American intelligence: A new look at an old controversy. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 6–25.

      Goldman, R. M. (1964). The politics of political integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 26–34.

      Rudwick, E. M. (1964). East St. Louis and the “colonization conspiracy” of 1916. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 35–42.

      Robbins, G. (1964). Rossa B. Cooley and Penn School [SC]: Social dynamo in a Negro rural subculture, 1901–1930. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 43–51.

      Latimer, J. (1964). The apprenticeship system in the British West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 52–57.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Redden, C. L. (1964). The American Negro: An annotated list of educational films and filmstrips. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 79–82.

      Guild, J. P. (1964). Who is a Negro? The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 83–85.

      Palmer, R. (1964). General education and the profession-bound Negro student. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 86–89.

      Bradley, G. H. (1964). Friendships among students in desegregated schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 90–92.

      Smith, P. M., Jr. (1964). The realism of counseling for scholarship aid with freshmen in the Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 93–95.

      Volume 33Spring 1964Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1964). A memorandum on the education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 97–102.

      Editorial

      Ware, G. (1964). Lobbying as a means of protest: The NAACP as an agent of equality. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 103–110.

      Perry, J. G. (1964). The job outlook for Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 111–116.

      Lane, D. A. (1964). An army project in the duty-time general education of Negro troops in Europe, 1947–51. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 117–124.

      Clarke, J. H. (1964). The search for Timbuctoo (sic). The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 125–130.

      Sisk, G. (1964). The Negro colleges in Atlanta. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 131–135.

      Hines, R. H. (1964). Social expectations and cultural deprivation. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 136–142.

      Corbett, D. M. (1964). Taras Shevchenko and Ira Aldridge. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 143–150.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Willie, C. V. (1964). Anti-social behavior among disadvantaged youth: Some observations on prevention for teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 176–181.

      Haisch, H. M. (1964). Do child labor laws prevent youth employment? The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 182–185.

      D'Amico, L. A., & Reed, M. M. (1964). A comparison of tuition-and-fee charges in Negro institutions with charges in institutions of the southeast and of the nation: 1962–1963. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 186–190.

      Josey, E. J. (1964). Enhancing and strengthening faculty-library relationships. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 191–196.

      Alston, F. C., & Williams, R. O. (1964). Johnny doesn't-didn't hear. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 197–200.

      Selkow, S. (1964). A view from Africa of American race relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 201–202.

      Volume 33Summer 1964Number 3

      Educational Planning for Socially Disadvantaged Children and Youth

      Yearbook Number 33

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1964). Educational planning for socially disadvantaged children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 203–209.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Identifying Needs and Characteristics

      Havighurst, R. J. (1964). Who are the socially disadvantaged? The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 210–217.

      Daniel, W. G. (1964). Problems of disadvantaged youth, urban and rural. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 218–224.

      Riessman, F. (1964). The overlooked positives of disadvantaged groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 225–231.

      Deutsch, M. (1964). Social and psychological perspectives on the development of the disadvantaged learner. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 232–244.

      Spears, H., & Pivnick, I. (1964). How an urban school system identifies its disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 245–253.

      Section 2. Specific Areas of Emphasis Necessary to Effective Planning

      Johnson, G. O. (1964). Organizing instruction and curriculum planning for the socially disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 254–263.

      Newton, E. S. (1964). Planning for the language development of disadvantaged children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 264–274.

      Perry, J. G. (1964). The preparation of disadvantaged youth for employment and civic responsibilities. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 275–281.

      Reed, H. J. (1964). Guidance and counseling. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 282–289.

      Froe, O. D. (1964). Educational planning for disadvantaged college youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 290–303.

      Section 3. Factors Influencing Effective Planning

      Marburger, C. L. (1964). School and community roles in effective planning. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 304–310.

      Liddle, G. P., & Rockwell, R. E. (1964). The role of parents and family life. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 311–317.

      Landers, J. (1964). The responsibilities of teachers and school administrators. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 318–332.

      Thompson, D. C. (1964). Evaluation as a factor in planning programs for the culturally disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 333–340.

      Section 4. Evaluation of the Yearbook

      Watson, G. (1964). A critical evaluation of the yearbook, 1964. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 341–345.

      Section 5. Research and Bibliography

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1964). Prevailing and needed emphasis in research on the education of disadvantaged children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 346–357.

      Volume 33Fall 1964Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1964). We learn what we live. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 367–370.

      Editorial

      Tillman, J. A., Jr. (1964). The case against de facto segregated education in the North and West: A contemporary case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 371–381.

      Brazziel, W. F. (1964). High horizons in southern elementary schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 382–389.

      Kraft, I. (1964). “Learning How to Learn”: Myth or reality? The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 390–395.

      Oppenheimer, M. (1964). The southern student movement: Year 1. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 396–403.

      Sisk, G. (1964). The Negro colleges in Atlanta. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 404–408.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Arnez, N. L. (1964). A liberal education for junior high school students in a culturally limited area. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 436–440.

      Byrne, D., & Andres, D. (1964). Prejudice and interpersonal expectancies. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 441–445.

      Fein, C. P. (1964). Marcus Garvey: His opinions about Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 446–449.

      Lowe, G. A. (1964). A study of Jamaican students at Howard University, 1961–1962. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 450–453.

      Conyers, J. E., & Kennedy, T. H. (1964). Reported knowledge Negro and White college students have of Negroes who have passed as Whites. The Journal of Negro Education, 33, 454–459.

      Volume 34Winter 1965Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1965). New focus on the American student as a learner. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 1–4.

      Editorial

      Holmes, E. C. (1965). Alain L. Locke and the adult education movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 5–10.

      Palmer, R. R. (1965). “The Negro's quest for freedom and the good life.” The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 11–16.

      Harris, E. E. (1965). Family and student identities: An exploratory study in self and “we-group” attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 17–22.

      Walker, B., Jr. (1965). Improving community health through student participation. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 23–29.

      West, E. H. (1965). Summary of research during 1963 related to the Negro and Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 30–38.

      Reprinted Editorial

      Havighurst, R. J. (1965). Who are the socially disadvantaged? The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 39–46.

      Spears, H., & Pivnick, I. (1965). How an urban school system identifies its disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 47–55.

      Liddle, G. P., & Rockwell, R. E. (1965). The role of parents and family life. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 56–62.

      Landers, J. (1965). The responsibilities of teachers and school administrators. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 63–77.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Rowland, M., & Hill, P. (1965). Race, illustrations, and interest in materials for reading and creative writing. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 84–87.

      Wolfe, D. P. (1965). What the Economic Opportunity Act means to the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 88–92.

      Hawkins, T. E. (1965). Utilizing the services of the academically talented students. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 93–95.

      Lyda, W. J., & Copenny, V. P. (1965). Some selected factors associated with rural and urban dropouts in Laurens County, Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 96–98.

      Nelson, H. A. (1965). A note on education and the Negro revolt. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 99–102.

      Volume 34Spring 1965Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1965). Negro education and welfare one hundred years after Appomattox. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 103–105.

      Editorial

      Pickens, W. G. (1965). Teaching Negro culture in high schools—Is it worthwhile? The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 106–113.

      Webster, S. W. (1965). Some correlates of reported academically supportive behaviors of Negro mothers toward their children. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 114–120.

      Hargrett, A. J. (1965). The education-unemployment relationship in Chicago as revealed in the 1960 census. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 121–129.

      Hickerson, N. (1965). Some aspects of school integration in a California high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 130–137.

      Radin, N., & Kamii, C. K. (1965). The childrearing attitudes of disadvantaged Negro mothers and some educational implications. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 138–146.

      Herson, P. (1965). Personal and sociological variables associated with the occupational choices of Negro youth: Some implications for guidance. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 147–151.

      Blassingame, J. W. (1965). The Union Army as an educational institution for Negroes, 1862–1865. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 152–159.

      Reprinted Editorial

      Riessman, F. (1965). The overlooked positives of disadvantaged groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 160–166.

      Newton, E. S. (1965). Planning for the language development of disadvantaged children and youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 167–177.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Hamilton, H. (1965). “They spoke of their futures with hope.” The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 184–187.

      Bryant, L. C. (1965). Assistance desired by counselors from the State Department of Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 188–191.

      Hayes, E. D., & Monroe, E. M. (1965). Impressions of short term counseling interviews among 187 freshmen students at Gibbs Junior College, St. Petersburg, Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 192–194.

      Sacadat, E. (1965). Arousing parent interest in a program for the culturally deprived. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 195–196.

      Volume 34Summer 1965Number 3

      Education and Civil Rights in 1965

      Yearbook Number 34

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1965). Education and civil rights in 1965. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 197–203.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Nature, Scope, and Issues Involved

      Keppel, F. (1965). The emerging partnership of education and civil rights. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 204–208.

      Willie, C. V. (1965). Education, deprivation and alienation. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 209–219.

      Hess, R. D., Shipman, V., & Jackson, D. (1965). Some new dimensions in providing equal educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 220–231.

      Morsell, J. A. (1965). Legislation and its implementation. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 232–238.

      Lewis, H. O. (1965). American education and civil rights in an international perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 239–248.

      Section 2. Administrative, Community, and Psychological Aspects of School Integration

      Dodson, D. W. (1965). School administration, control, and public policy concerning integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 249–257.

      Dentler, R. A. (1965). Community behavior and northern school desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 258–267.

      Killian, L. M., & Grigg, C. M. (1965). Community resistance to and acceptance of desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 268–277.

      Grossack, M. M. (1965). Psychological considerations essential to effective educational integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 278–287.

      Blake, E., Jr. (1965). Color prejudice and the education of low income Negroes in the North and West. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 288–299.

      Section 3. Equalizing Educational Opportunity With Special Reference to Race

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1965). School integration, compensatory education and the civil rights movement in the North. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 300–309.

      West, E. H., & Daniel, W. G. (1965). Programs in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 310–318.

      Sullivan, N. V. (1965). A case study in achieving equal educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 319–326.

      Green, R. L., & Hofman, L. J. (1965). A case study of the effects of educational deprivation on southern rural Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 327–341.

      Landers, J., & Mercurio, C. (1965). Improving curriculum and instruction for the disadvantaged minorities. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 342–366.

      Reddick, L. D. (1965). What now do we learn of race and minority peoples? The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 367–376.

      Volume 34Fall 1965Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1965). Teachers for America's disadvantaged with special reference to race. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 381–384.

      Editorial

      Gittell, M. (1965). A pilot study of Negro middle class attitudes toward higher education in New York. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 385–394.

      Rousseve, R. J. (1965). Counselor education and the culturally isolated: An alliance for mutual benefit. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 395–403.

      Morgan, G. D. (1965). De-professionalization of teaching in East Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 404–412.

      Gutman, H. G. (1965). Peter H. Clark: Pioneer Negro socialist, 1877. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 413–418.

      Richardson, J. M. (1965). The Negro in post Civil-War Tennessee: A report by a northern missionary. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 419–424.

      Harris, E. E. (1965). Racial and national identities: An exploratory study in self and “we-group” attitudes. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 425–430.

      Hare, N. (1965). Conflicting racial orientations of Negro college students and professors. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 431–434.

      Latimer, J. (1965). The foundation of religious education in the British West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 435–442.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Scales, E. E. (1965). Regional-racial differences in income and level of education. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 454–458.

      Mayberry, T. J., Jr. (1965). The educator of Negro pupils in the Alabama public schools, 1865–1954. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 459–460.

      Eisenman, R. (1965). Reducing prejudice by Negro-White contacts. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 461–462.

      Strom, R. D. (1965). Education: Key to economic equality for the Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 34, 463–466.

      Volume 35Winter 1966Number 1

      Special Issue: Education, Race, and Economics

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1966). Education, race, and economic opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 1–4.

      Editorial

      Determan, D. W., & Ware, G. (1966). New dimensions in education: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 5–10.

      Blodgett, E., & Green, R. L. (1966). A junior high school group counseling program. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 11–17.

      Rose, H. M. (1966). An appraisal of the Negro educator's situation in the academic marketplace. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 18–26.

      Simons, A. E., & Burke, N. S. (1966). The probable syndrome in terms of educational experiences which precipitates dropouts, delinquency, and eventual incarceration. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 27–34.

      Simms, D. M. (1966). The Negro spiritual: Origins and themes. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 35–41.

      Ponder, H. (1966). An example of the alternative cost doctrine applied to racial discrimination. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 42–47.

      Arnez, N. L. (1966). A thoughtful look at placement policies in a new era. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 48–54.

      Webster, S. W., & Kroger, M. N. (1966). A comparative study of selected perceptions and feelings of Negro adolescents with and without White friends in integrated urban high schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 55–61.

      West, E. H. (1966). Summary of research during 1964 related to the Negro and Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 62–72.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Rudwick, E. M. (1966). Oscar De Priest and the Jim Crow restaurant in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 77–82.

      Brazziel, W. F. (1966). Manpower training and the Negro worker. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 83–87.

      Penn, N. (1966). Racial influence on vocational choice. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 88–89.

      Keith, J. P., Jordan, J. E., & Matheny, K. B. (1966). A cross-cultural study of potential school dropouts in certain sub-Saharan countries. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 90–94.

      Smith, P. M., Jr., & Johnson, N. C. (1966). Attitudes and academic status of freshmen. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 95–100.

      Bell, H. H. (1966). Negro nationalism in the 1850s. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 101–104.

      Volume 35Spring 1966Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1966). Race, stereotypes, and contemporary educational problems. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 105–109.

      Editorial

      Hickerson, N. (1966). Physical integration alone is not enough. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 110–116.

      Ornstein, A. C. (1966). Program revision for culturally disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 117–124.

      Boskin, J. (1966). The origins of American slavery: Education as an index of early differentiation. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 125–133.

      Harrison, I. E. (1966). The state employment service and the attitudes of “unemployable” dropouts. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 134–143.

      Levinson, B. M. (1966). A comparative study of northern and southern Negro homeless men. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 144–150.

      Cooke, P. (1966). Delinquency prevention through educational intervention. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 151–160.

      Weinberg, C. (1966). Social attitudes of Negro and White student leaders. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 161–167.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Cheyney, A. B. (1966). Curricular methods used by outstanding teachers of culturally disadvantaged elementary school children. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 174–177.

      Kirman, J. M. (1966). A White teacher in a Negro school. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 178–179.

      Levine, D. U. (1966). Prerequisites for success in working with parents of disadvantaged youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 180–183.

      Knight, O. B. (1966). A study of attitudes of a select group of principals toward special classes for the mentally retarded. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 184–188.

      Allman, R. W. (1966). The knowledge of English usage of 318 graduate students at college “A.” The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 189–194.

      Vogel, A. W. (1966). The education of the Negro in Richard Wright's Black Boy. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 195–198.

      Volume 35Summer 1966Number 3

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1966). Needed: A re-examination of plans for disadvantaged Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 199–203.

      Editorial

      Meeth, L. R. (1966). The report on predominantly Negro colleges one year later. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 204–209.

      Vontress, C. E. (1966). The Negro personality reconsidered. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 210–217.

      Sigel, I. E., Anderson, L. M., & Shapiro, H. (1966). Categorization behavior of lower- and middle-class Negro preschool children: Differences in dealing with representation of familiar objects. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 218–229.

      Lowe, G. A. (1966). Education, occupation of fathers and parental contributions to educational expenses as factors in career aspirations among male Jamaican students. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 230–236.

      Austin, G. E. (1966). The advent of the Negro actor on the legitimate stage in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 237–245.

      Brown, B. E. (1966). “Learning is fun” with the dictaphone electronic classroom—A discussion. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 246–251.

      Billington, M. (1966). Public school integration in Missouri, 1954–64. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 252–262.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Petrof, J. V. (1966). Business administration curricula in predominantly Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 276–279.

      Caliguri, J. (1966). The self-concept of the poverty child. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 280–282.

      Warren, P. B. (1966). Guidelines for the future—An educational approach for the culturally disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 283–286.

      Dodd, J. M., & Randall, R. R. (1966). A comparison of Negro children's drawings of a man and a woman. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 287–288.

      Onwuachi, P. C. (1966). African traditional culture and western education. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 289–292.

      Volume 35Fall 1966Number 4

      Studies in the Higher Education of Negro Americans

      Yearbook Number 35

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1966). Studies in the higher education of Negro Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 293–298.

      Editorial

      Clement, R. E. (1966). The historical development of higher education for Negro Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 299–305.

      Badger, H. G. (1966). Colleges that did not survive. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 306–312.

      Bindman, A. M. (1966). Pre-college preparation of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 313–321.

      Fichter, J. H. (1966). Career preparation and expectations of Negro college seniors. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 322–335.

      Gurin, P. (1966). Social class constraints on the occupational aspirations of students attending some predominantly Negro colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 336–350.

      Harris, E. E. (1966). Some comparisons among Negro-White college students: Social ambition and estimated social mobility. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 351–368.

      Abraham, A. A., & Simmons, G. L. (1966). The educational outlook for non-Whites in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 369–380.

      Huyck, E. E. (1966). Faculty in predominantly White and predominantly Negro higher institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 381–392.

      Plaut, R. L. (1966). Plans for assisting Negro students to enter and to remain in college. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 393–399.

      Love, T. R. (1966). Needs and approaches for developing linguistic abilities. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 400–408.

      Hurst, C. G., Jr., & Jones, W. L. (1966). Psychosocial concomitants of sub-standard speech. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 409–421.

      Froe, O. D. (1966). Meeting the needs of college youth: The Morgan State College Program. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 422–429.

      Wiggins, S. P. (1966). Dilemmas in desegregation in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 430–438.

      Cleary, R. E. (1966). The role of gubernatorial leadership in desegregation in public higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 439–444.

      Cohen, A. M. (1966). The process of desegregation: A case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 445–451.

      Allen, L. B. (1966). The possibilities of integration for public colleges founded for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 452–458.

      Ware, G., & Determan, D. W. (1966). The federal dollar, the Negro college, and the Negro student. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 459–468.

      Branson, H. R. (1966). Interinstitutional programs for promoting equal higher educational opportunities for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 469–476.

      Patterson, F. D. (1966). Cooperation among the predominantly Negro colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 477–484.

      Miller, C. L. (1966). Issues and problems in the higher education of Negro Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 485–493.

      Meeth, L. R. (1966). The transition of the predominantly Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 494–505.

      Wright, S. J. (1966). Problems, developments and issues incident to equality of opportunity in the higher education of Negroes: A critical summary of the 1966 yearbook. The Journal of Negro Education, 35, 506–513.

      Volume 36Winter 1967Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1967). The Howard University Centennial and the higher education of Negro Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 1–4.

      Editorial

      Green, R. L., Hofmann, L. J., & Morgan, R. F. (1967). Some effects of deprivation on intelligence, achievement, and cognitive growth. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 5–14.

      Bradley, N. E. (1967). The Negro undergraduate student: Factors relative to performance in predominantly White state colleges and universities in Tennessee. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 15–23.

      Fen, S. (1967). Notes on the education of Negroes in North Carolina during the Civil War. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 24–31.

      Piedmont, E. B. (1967). Changing racial attitudes at a southern university: 1947–1964. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 32–41.

      Henderson, G. (1967). Beyond poverty of income. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 42–50.

      Vittenson, L. K. (1967). Areas of concern to Negro college students as indicated by their responses to the Mooney Problem Check List. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 51–57.

      West, E. H. (1967). Summary of doctoral research in 1965 related to the Negro and Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 58–69.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Morris, E. W. (1967). Facts and factors of faculty desegregation in Kentucky, 1955–1965. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 75–77.

      Paschal, B. J. (1967). Mathematical readiness. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 78–80.

      Kirman, J. M. (1967). Teaching culturally deprived Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 81–82.

      Milliken, R. L., & Clardy, F. (1967). Prejudice and discrimination in college student personnel services. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 83–87.

      Volume 36Spring 1967Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1967). Improving schools in their societal context. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 89–93.

      Editorial

      McAndrew, G. (1967). Educational innovation in North Carolina—A case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 94–99.

      Palley, H. A. (1967). Community action, public programs and youth unemployment: A case study of Newark, New Jersey. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 100–110.

      Cameron, H. (1967). A review of research and an investigation of emotional dependency among Negro youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 111–120.

      Marcus, R., Bispo, E., & Katuna, I. (1967). Social change and curriculum innovation. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 121–128.

      Kiernan, I. R., & Daniels, R. P. (1967). Signs of social change through an exploratory study of 23 Negro students in a community college. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 129–135.

      Ornstein, A. C. (1967). Techniques and fundamentals for teaching the disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 136–145.

      Morgan, G. D. (1967). Predicting the performance of African students on the Cambridge Examination. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 146–153.

      Gibson, G. W. (1967). What's it all about? The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 154–163.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Pruitt, A. S. (1967). Educators and industry confront the employment problems of Negro high school graduates. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 168–172.

      Weatherford, A. E., II. (1967). Critical problems and issues associated with recreation in public education. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 173–176.

      Smith, D. H. (1967). A speaker models project to enhance pupils' self-esteem. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 177–180.

      Cordasco, F. M. (1967). The Puerto Rican child in the American school. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 181–186.

      Volume 36Summer 1967Number 3

      Higher Education of Negro Americans: Prospects and Programs

      Yearbook Number 36

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1967). The higher education of Negro Americans: Prospects and programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 187–191.

      Conference Program

      Howard University. (1967, April 16–18). Program of the conference on “The Higher Education of Negro Americans: Prospects and Programs.” The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 192–195.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Higher Education for Negroes: Challenges and Prospects

      Clark, K. B. (1967). Higher education for Negroes: Challenges and prospects. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 196–203.

      Daniel, W. G. (Ed.). (1967). Symposium on the higher education of Negro Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 204–215.

      Section 2. Prospects for Improving Programs and Participation in Higher Education

      Dyer, H. S. (1967). Toward more effective recruitment and selection of Negroes for college. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 216–229.

      Plaut, R. L. (1967). Prospects for the entrance and scholastic advancement of Negroes in higher educational institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 230–237.

      Valien, P. (1967). Improving programs in graduate education for Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 238–248.

      Section 3. Support for Higher Education

      Kirk, G. (1967). Changing patterns of public and private support for higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 249–257.

      Section 4. Institutional Roles in the Higher Education of Negro Americans

      Bressler, M. (1967). White colleges and Negro higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 258–265.

      Henderson, V. W. (1967). The role of the predominantly Negro institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 266–273.

      Pettigrew, T. F. (1967). A social psychological view of the predominantly Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 274–285.

      Section 5. Evaluation and Issues Emerging from the Conference and the Yearbook

      Bayton, J. A., & Lewis, H. O. (1967). Reflections and suggestions for further study concerning the higher education of Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 286–294.

      Thompson, C. H. (1967). The higher education of Negro Americans: Prospects and programs—A critical summary. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 295–314.

      Section 6. Supplementary Studies and Appendix

      Boney, J. D. (1967). Some dynamics of disadvantaged students in learning situations. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 315–319.

      McClain, E. W. (1967). Personality characteristics of Negro college students in the South—A recent appraisal. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 320–325.

      Codwell, J. E. (1967). The Education Improvement Project of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools—A focus on improving the educational performance of disadvantaged pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 326–333.

      Volume 36Fall 1967Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1967). Home-school relationships. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 349–352.

      Editorial

      Glenn, N. D. (1967). Negro population concentration and Negro status. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 353–361.

      Hurst, C. G., Jr., & Jones, W. L. (1967). Generating spontaneous speech in the under-privileged child. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 362–367.

      Lowe, G. A., Jr. (1967). Howard University students and the community service project. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 368–376.

      Weinberg, C. (1967). Education level and perceptions of Los Angeles Negroes of educational conditions in a riot area. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 377–384.

      Antonovsky, A. (1967). Aspirations, class and racial-ethnic membership. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 385–393.

      Meier, A., & Rudwick, E. M. (1967). Early boycotts of segregated schools: The Alton, Illinois case, 1897–1908. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 394–402.

      Detweiler, J. S. (1967). The Negro teacher and the Fourteenth Amendment. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 403–409.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Harris, E. E. (1967). Upward social mobility as an escape: The cases of Negroes and Whites. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 420–423.

      Cangemi, J. P. (1967). Life-chances: A comment on the dynamics of education and money. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 424–427.

      Annella, S. M. (1967). Interracial marriages in Washington, D.C. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 428–433.

      Cuban, L. (1967). Not “whether?” but “why? and how?”—Instructional materials on the Negro in the public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 36, 434–436.

      Volume 37Winter 1968Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1968). The ethical challenge of teaching. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Levine, D. U. (1968). Issues in the provision of equal educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 4–14.

      Ekberg, D., & Ury, C. (1968). “Education for what?”—A report on an M.D.T.A. [Manpower Development and Training Act] program. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 15–22.

      Hines, R. H. (1968). Social distance components in integration attitudes of Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 23–30.

      Littig, L. W. (1968). Negro personality correlates of aspiration to traditionally open and closed occupations. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 31–36.

      Vontress, C. E. (1968). Counseling Negro students for college. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 37–44.

      Spraggins, T. L. (1968). New educational goals and direction: A perspective of Title I, ESEA [Elementary and Secondary Education Act]. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 45–54.

      Weber, R. E. (1968). Feedback and the job corps. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 55–61.

      Waite, R. R. (1968). Further attempts to integrate and urbanize first grade reading textbooks: A research study. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 62–69.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Caliguri, J., & Robertson, E. (1968). Preschool children's comparative performance on the Head Start Social Behavior Inventory. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 75–78.

      Smith, P. M., Jr. (1968). Drop-out prone feelings with urban and small town culturally disadvantaged pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 79–81.

      Bragg, E. W. (1968). A study of the college campus as a learning environment. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 82–85.

      Rowland, M. K., & Delcampo, P. (1968). The values of the educationally disadvantaged: How different are they? The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 86–89.

      Schuster, J. W. (1968). The values of Negro and Caucasian children: Do they differ? The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 90–94.

      Volume 37Spring 1968Number 2

      Special Issue: Education, the Disadvantaged, and Values

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1968). Education, the disadvantaged, and values. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 95–97.

      Editorial

      Carter, T. P., & Hickerson, N. (1968). A California citizens' committee studies its schools and de facto segregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 98–105.

      Clarizio, H. F. (1968). Maternal attitude change associated with involvement in Project Head Start. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 106–113.

      Bolner, J. (1968). Defining racial imbalance in public educational institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 114–126.

      Weber, G. H., & Motz, A. B. (1968). School as perceived by the dropout. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 127–134.

      Hill, B. M., & Burke, N. S. (1968). Some disadvantaged youths look at their schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 135–139.

      Deane, P. C. (1968). The persistence of Uncle Tom: An examination of the image of the Negro in children's fiction series. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 140–145.

      Claye, C. M. (1968). Barriers to effective teaching. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 146–152.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Mann, J. S. (1968). Authority styles in a project for Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 160–163.

      Larson, R. G., & Olson, J. L. (1968). Compensatory education: How much is enough? The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 164–167.

      Neslon, J. C. (1968). Interests of disadvantaged and advantaged Negro and White first graders. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 168–173.

      Atchison, C. O. (1968). Relationships between some intellectual and nonintellectual factors of high anxiety and low anxiety Negro college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 174–178.

      Cawley, J. F. (1968). Learning aptitudes among preschool children of different intellectual levels. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 179–183.

      Volume 37Summer 1968Number 3

      Race and Equality in Education

      Yearbook Number 37

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1968). Race and equality in American education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 185–190.

      Editorial

      Section 1. Equal Educational Opportunity and Race:

      Some Dimensions of the Problem

      Thompson, C. H. (1968). Race and equality of educational opportunity: Defining the problem. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 191–203.

      Carter, R. L. (1968). The law and racial equality in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 204–211.

      West, E. H. (1968). Progress toward equality of opportunity in elementary and secondary education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 212–219.

      Willie, C. V. (1968). New perspectives in school-community relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 220–226.

      Section 2. The Assessment of Negro Capacity and Achievement

      Shulman, L. S. (1968). Negro-White differences in employability, self-concept, and related measures among adolescents classified as mentally handicapped. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 227–240.

      Poussaint, A. F., & Atkinson, C. O. (1968). Negro youth and psychological motivation. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 241–251.

      Cameron, H. K. (1968). Nonintellectual correlates of academic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 252–257.

      Manning, W. H. (1968). The measurement of intellectual capacity and performance. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 258–267.

      Section 3. Programs for the Improvement of Public Education

      Gordon, E. W., & Jablonsky, A. (1968). Compensatory education in the equalization of educational opportunity, I. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 268–279.

      Gordon, E. W., & Jablonsky, A. (1968). Compensatory education in the equalization of educational opportunity, II: An organizational model for compensatory education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 280–290.

      Mahan, T. W. (1968). The busing of students for equal opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 291–300.

      Fischer, J. H. (1968). School parks for equal opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 301–309.

      Section 4. Toward Equal Opportunities in Higher Education

      Barros, F. J. (1968). Equal opportunity in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 310–315.

      Stembridge, B. P. (1968). A student's appraisal of the adequacy of higher education for Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 316–322.

      Hayes, C. L. (1968). Institutional appraisal and planning for equal educational opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 323–329.

      Section 5. Summary and Evaluation

      Cooke, P. P. (1968). Equal educational opportunity: Some findings and conclusions. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 330–339.

      Dyer, H. S. (1968). Summary and evaluation of contributions to the yearbook: Race and equality in American education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 340–358.

      Volume 37Fall 1968Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1968). Education and jobs. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 359–363.

      Editorial

      Adler, M. (1968). Intelligence testing of the culturally disadvantaged: Some pitfalls. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 364–369.

      Froe, O. D. (1968). A comparative study of a population of “disadvantaged” college freshmen. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 370–382.

      Herson, P. F. (1968). An assessment of changes in achievement motivation among Upward Bound participants at the University of Maryland. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 383–391.

      Paschal, B. J. (1968). The role of self concept in achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 392–396.

      Lee, G. A. (1968). Negroes in a medium-sized metropolis: Allentown, Pennsylvania—A case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 397–405.

      Cagle, L. T., & Beker, J. (1968). Social characteristics and educational aspirations of northern, lower-class, predominantly Negro parents who accepted and declined a school integration opportunity. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 406–417.

      North, G. E., & Buchanan, O. L. (1968). Maternal attitudes in a poverty area. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 418–425.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Freeman, D., Kimbrough, R., & Zolili, B. (1968). The meaning of education. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 432–434.

      Caplin, M. D. (1968). Self concept, level of aspiration, and academic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 435–439.

      Harris, E. E. (1968). Prejudice and other social factors in school segregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 440–443.

      McNamara, J. R. (1968). A pilot program for pre-school culturally deprived children with learning disabilities. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 444–446.

      Kraft, L. E., & Kraft, W. R. (1968). Survey of attitudes of rural disadvantaged pupils toward their school—A model. The Journal of Negro Education, 37, 447–451.

      Volume 38Winter 1969Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1969). The concept of relevance. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Allen, I. L. (1969). Selecting an economic probability sample of Negro households in a city. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 4–13.

      Deberry, C. E., Fashing, J., & Harris, C. (1969). Black power and Black population: A dilemma. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 14–21.

      Trooboff, B. M. (1969). Employment opportunities for Negroes in the health related occupations. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 22–31.

      Phillips, R. E. (1969). Student activities and self-concept. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 32–37.

      Comer, J. P., Harrow, M., & Johnson, S. H. (1969). Summer study-skills program: A case for structure. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 38–45.

      Lessler, K., & Fox, R. E. (1969). An evaluation of a Head Start Program in a low population area. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 46–54.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Forbes, G. B., & Gipson, M. (1969). Political attitudes and opinions, need for social approval, dogmatism and anxiety in Negro and White college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 61–63.

      Pasca, A. E. (1969). A business career for the Negro male. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 64–68.

      Smith, W. C., & Dean, K. I. (1969). Negro boys in the youth development centers of Georgia. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 69–73.

      Williams, R. L., & Cole, S. (1969). Scholastic attitudes of southern Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 74–77.

      Smith, P. M., Jr., & Pindle, V. (1969). The culturally disadvantaged pupil on the cumulative record. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 78–81.

      Ornstein, A. C. (1969). Theory practices for teaching disadvantaged youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 82–85.

      Beard, R. L. (1969). Popular culture and Negro education. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 86–90.

      Volume 38Spring 1969Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1969). The affective domain. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 91–93.

      Editorial

      Clift, V. A. (1969). Curriculum strategy based on the personality characteristics of disadvantaged youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 94–104.

      Slaughter, C. H. (1969). Cognitive style: Some implications for curriculum and instructional practices among Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 105–111.

      Sorkin, A. L. (1969). A comparison of quality characteristics in Negro and White public colleges and universities in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 112–119.

      Rosen, B. (1969). The use of potentially discriminatory questions on college applications in the southern United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 120–124.

      Bolner, J. (1969). The Supreme Court and racially imbalanced public schools in 1967. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 125–134.

      Mann, P. H. (1969). Modifying the behavior of Negro educable mentally retarded boys through group counseling procedures. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 135–142.

      Knight, O. B. (1969). The self concept of Negro and White educable mentally retarded boys. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 143–146.

      Green, R. L., & Morgan, R. F. (1969). The effects of resumed schooling on the measured intelligence of Prince Edward County's Black children. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 147–155.

      Hall, M. M., & Gentry, H. W. (1969). Isolation of Negro students in integrated public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 156–161.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Ubben, G. C., & Hughes, L. W. (1969). Preparation programs for top level Negro public school administrators—A new perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 169–172.

      Mattleman, M. S., & Emans, R. L. (1969). The language of the inner-city child: A comparison of Puerto Rican and Negro third grade girls. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 173–176.

      Poulos, N. (1969). Negro attitudes toward textbook illustrations. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 177–181.

      Webster, S. W. (1969). The case for a federal demonstration school system. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 182–184.

      Volume 38Summer 1969Number 3

      Minority Groups and Contemporary Education

      Yearbook Number 38

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1969). American minority groups and contemporary education. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 185–186.

      Editorial

      Section 1. The Background and Issues Involved

      Glazer, N. (1969). Ethnic groups and education: Towards the tolerance of difference. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 187–195.

      Holmes, E. C. (1969). A philosophical approach to the study of minority problems. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 196–203.

      Hill, H. (1969). Employment, manpower training and the Black worker. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 204–217.

      Section 2. Studies of Selected Minorities

      Lincoln, C. E. (1969). The relevance of education for Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 218–223.

      Hooper, F. H. (1969). The Appalachian child's intellectual capabilities—Deprivation or diversity? The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 224–235.

      Roucek, J. S. (1969). The problems of Jewish education. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 236–241.

      Welch, W. B. (1969). The American Indian (A stifled minority). The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 242–246.

      Vazquez, H. I. (1969). Puerto Rican Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 247–256.

      Section 3. Programs and Strategies for Meeting the Needs for Minority Groups

      Newton, E. S. (1969). Bibliotherapy in the development of minority group self concept. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 257–265.

      Vontress, C. E. (1969). Cultural differences: Implications for counseling. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 266–275.

      Morsell, J. A. (1969). Racial desegregation and integration in public education. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 276–284.

      Young, W. M., Jr. (1969). Minorities and community control of the schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 285–290.

      Clift, V. A. (1969). Higher education of minority groups in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 291–302.

      Glickstein, H. A. (1969). Federal educational programs and minority groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 303–314.

      Ginzberg, E. (1969). The changing manpower scene. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 315–323.

      Section 4. Summary and Evaluation

      Rossi, P. H. (1969). The education of failures or the failure of education? (Yearbook summary). The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 324–333.

      Volume 38Fall 1969Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1969). Desegregation slowdown. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 335–337.

      Editorial

      Williams, R. L., & Vendetti, F. (1969). Effect of academic desegregation on southern White students' expressed satisfaction with school. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 338–341.

      Gaier, E. L., & Watts, W. A. (1969). Current attitudes and socialization patterns of White and Negro students entering college. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 342–350.

      Larson, R. G. (1969). School curriculum and the urban disadvantaged: A historical review and some thoughts about tomorrow. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 351–360.

      Friedman, N. (1969). The Miles College Freshman Social Science Program: Educational innovation in a Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 361–369.

      Hodgkins, B. J., & Stakenas, R. G. (1969). A study of self-concepts of Negro and White youth in segregated environments. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 370–377.

      Morgan, G. D. (1969). The performance of East African students on an experimental test battery. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 378–383.

      Rambo, L. M. (1969). Effects of experimenter bias on attitudes toward controversial issues. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 384–394.

      Dewing, R. (1969). Desegregation of state NEA [National Education Association] affiliates in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 395–403.

      Allen, R. L., & Nickel, D. L. (1969). The Negro and learning to swim: The buoyancy problem related to reported biological differences. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 404–411.

      Solkoff, N. (1969). Reactions to frustration in Negro and White children. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 412–418.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Henshel, A., & Henshel, R. L. (1969). Black studies programs: Promise and pitfalls. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 423–429.

      Katz, W. L. (1969). Black history in secondary schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 430–434.

      Roth, R. W. (1969). The effects of “Black studies” on Negro fifth grade students. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 435–439.

      Drimmer, M. (1969). Teaching Black history in America: What are the problems? The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 440–442.

      Gilpin, P. J., & White, O. K., Jr. (1969). A challenge to White, southern universities—An argument for including Negro history in the curriculum. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 443–446.

      Brown, L. W. (1969). Why and how the Negro in history. The Journal of Negro Education, 38, 447–452.

      Racial Identity and Black Consciousness Years (1970–1979)
      Volume 39Winter 1970Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1970). Education for Negroes in 1970. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Day, D. E., & George, L. Y. (1970). Effecting change in inner city schools: Some reflections. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 4–13.

      Epps, E. G. (1970). Interpersonal relations and motivation: Implications for teachers of disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 14–25.

      Oakland, T. (1970). A rationale for compensatory education programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 26–33.

      Paschal, B. J., & Williams, R. H. (1970). Some effects of participation in a summer Upward Bound program on the self-concept and attitude of the disadvantaged adolescent. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 34–43.

      Record, W. (1970). The White professional educators and the Black ghetto schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 44–49.

      Gershenberg, I. (1970). The Negro and the development of White public education in the South: Alabama, 1880–1930. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 50–59.

      Globetti, G. (1970). The drinking patterns of Negro and White high school students in two Mississippi communities. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 60–69.

      Latimer, J. (1970). The foundations of religious education in the Spanish West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 70–75.

      Jacobs, D. M. (1970). The nineteenth century struggle over segregated education in the Boston schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 76–85.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Wheeler, W. B. (1970). Teaching Negro history in the public schools: Let's not repeat our mistakes. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 91–95.

      Younge, J. W. (1970). A study of high school preparation and freshmen failures at North Carolina College at Durham. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 96–99.

      Asbury, C. A. (1970). Some effects of training on verbal mental functioning in Negro pre-school children: A research note. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 100–103.

      Muehl, L., & Muehl, S. (1970). One way to extract the “square” root from opera. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 104–106.

      Volume 39Spring 1970Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1970). A priority for the seventies. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 107–108.

      Editorial

      Saunders, M. H. (1970). An analysis of cultural differences on certain projective techniques. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 109–115.

      Rennels, M. R. (1970). The effects of instructional methodology in art education upon achievement on spatial tasks by disadvantaged Negro youths. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 116–123.

      Cawley, J. F., Burrow, W. H., & Goodstein, H. A. (1970). Performance of Head Start and non-Head Start participants at first grade. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 124–131.

      Stanfiel, J. D., & Watts, F. P. (1970). Freshman expectations and perceptions of the Howard University environment. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 132–138.

      Levine, D. U. (1970). Differences between segregated and desegregated settings. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 139–147.

      Sigel, E., & Jonas, G. F. (1970). Metropolitan cooperation in education: The greater Boston case. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 148–157.

      Hicks, E. P., & Beyer, B. K. (1970). Images of Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 158–166.

      Current Trends in Negro Education and Shorter Papers

      Johnson, J. C., II, & Jacobson, M. D. (1970). Operation summer-thrust: A study of the conceptual and verbal development of the culturally and educationally disadvantaged primary grade pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 171–176.

      Caldwell, M. B., & Knight, D. (1970). The effect of Negro and White examiners on Negro intelligence test performance. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 177–179.

      Olson, J. L., & Larson, R. G. (1970). Compensatory programs and special education: Is there an alliance? The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 180–183.

      Shadick, R. G. (1970). The myth of the apathetic parent. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 184–187.

      Volume 39Summer 1970Number 3

      Black Studies in American Education

      Yearbook Number 39

      Editorial Comment

      Daniel, W. G. (1970). Black studies in American education. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 189–191.

      Editorial

      Section 1: Background

      Vontress, C. E. (1970). Black studies—Boon or bane? The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 192–201.

      Section 2: Descriptions of Black Studies Programs

      Adams, W. E. (1970). Black studies in the elementary schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 202–208.

      Rigsby, G. U. (1970). Afro-American studies at Howard University: One year later. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 209–213.

      Brown, R. C., Jr. (1970). New York University: The Institute of Afro-American Affairs. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 214–220.

      Turner, D. T. (1970). The center for African Afro-American studies at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 221–229.

      Section 3: Evaluation of the Black Studies Movement

      Roth, R. W. (1970). Critique of developments at the elementary level. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 230–238.

      Smith, W. L. (1970). Critique of developments at the secondary level. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 239–261.

      Wesley, C. H. (1970). The need for research in the development of Black studies programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 262–273.

      Volume 39Fall 1970Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1970). Models in education. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 275–277.

      Editorial

      Gotz, I. (1970). Inalienable education. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 278–288.

      Dunn, C. J. (1970). An analysis of the personal characteristics of deprived youth in a school desegregation institute. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 289–295.

      Van den Daele, L. D. (1970). Preschool intervention through social learning for Disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 296–304.

      Harris, E. E. (1970). Personal and parental influences on college attendance: Some Negro-White differences. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 305–313.

      Blakely, K. B., & Somerville, A. W. (1970). An investigation of the preference for racial identification terms among Negro and Caucasian children. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 314–319.

      Hills, J. R., & Stanley, J. C. (1970). Easier test improves prediction of Black students' college grades. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 320–324.

      Whisenton, J. T., & Loree, M. R. (1970). A comparison of the values, needs, and aspirations of school leavers with those of non-school leavers. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 325–332.

      Kapel, D. E. (1970). Environmental factors, student variables, and employment adjustment of male Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 333–340.

      Sawyer, R. M. (1970). The National Educational Association and Negro education, 1865–1884. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 341–345.

      Koslin, S. C., Amarel, M., & Ames, N. (1970). The effect of race on peer evaluation and preference in primary grade children: An exploratory study. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 346–350.

      Hindelang, M. J. (1970). Educational and occupational aspirations among working class Negro, Mexican-American and White elementary school children. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 351–353.

      Bonner, M. W., & Belden, B. R. (1970). A comparative study of the performance of Negro seniors of Okalahoma City high schools on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 354–358.

      Davis, S. C., Loeb, J. W., & Robinson, L. F. (1970). A comparison of characteristics of Negro and White college freshman classmates. The Journal of Negro Education, 39, 359–366.

      Volume 40Winter 1971Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1971). Diagnostic teaching. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Goldman, H., & Larson, R. (1971). When inner-city teachers are given “free” time. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 4–11.

      Rea, R. E., & Reys, R. E. (1971). Mathematical competencies of Negro and non-Negro children entering school. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 12–16.

      Cosby, A. (1971). Black-White differences in aspirations among Deep South high school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 17–21.

      Sweet, J. R., & Thornburg, K. R. (1971). Preschoolers' self and social identity within the family structure. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 22–27.

      Edwards, O. L. (1971). Post-high school activity of inner-city youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 28–34.

      Richardson, J. M. (1971). Christian abolitionism: The American Missionary Association and the Florida Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 35–44.

      Harrison, L. J. (1971). The role of the Negro business school in promoting Black capitalism. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 45–47.

      Burrell, L., & Rayder, N. F. (1971). Black and White students' attitudes toward White counselors. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 48–52.

      Musgrove, W. J., & Lawson, J. R. (1971). A comparison of lower class Negro and White children on three standardized tests. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 53–55.

      Cordasco, F., & Galatioto, R. G. (1971). Ethnic displacement in the interstitial community: The East Harlem (New York City) experience. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 56–65.

      Cameron, P. (1971). Personality differences between typical urban Negroes and Whites. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 66–75.

      Georgeoff, J., & Bahlke, S. J. (1971). Race as a factor in knowledge about Negro history and culture. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 76–80.

      Lowe, G. A., Jr., & McDowell, S. F. (1971). Participant-nonparticipant differences in the Howard University student protest. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 81–90.

      Latimer, J. (1971). The foundations of religious education in the French West Indies. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 91–98.

      Volume 40Spring 1971Number 2

      Editorial

      Rust, V. (1971). Negro schools: A model for Nazi colonial education. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 103–107.

      Schab, F. (1971). Attitudinal differences of southern White and Negro adolescent males regarding the home, school, religion, and morality. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 108–110.

      Richmond, B. O. (1971). Creative and cognitive abilities of White and Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 111–116.

      Frerichs, A. H. (1971). Relationship of self-esteem of the disadvantaged to school success. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 117–120.

      Jones, J. P. (1971). Negro stereotypes in children's literature: The case of Nancy Drew. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 121–125.

      Allen, D. E., & Kinnard, R. E. (1971). Academic aspirations and financial preparations for college. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 126–132.

      Ornstein, A. C. (1971). The need for research on teaching the disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 133–139.

      Allen, V. S. (1971). An analysis of textbooks relative to the treatment of Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 140–145.

      Grady, M. L. (1971). An assessment of teachers' attitudes toward disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 146–152.

      Weaver, J. L. (1971). Educational attainment and economic success: Some notes on a ghetto study. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 153–158.

      Brown, J. C., Starnes, T. A., & Watson, J. A. (1971). Southern Negro and White educators: A comparison of pertinent characteristics. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 159–162.

      Myers, J. B. (1971). The education of Alabama freedmen during Presidential Reconstruction, 1865–1867. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 163–171.

      Webb, V. S. (1971). Developing democratic attitudes in children: A case for action research. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 172–176.

      Volume 40Summer 1971Number 3

      Strategies for Educational Change

      Yearbook Number 40

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1971). Strategies for educational change. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 189–191.

      Editorial

      Section A: Historical Background

      Newby, R. G., & Tyack, D. B. (1971). Victims without “crimes”: Some historical perspectives on Black education. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 192–206.

      Section B: Analysis of Specific Educational Change Agents

      Weinberg, M. (1971). Schooling and the new parenthood. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 207–215.

      Gittell, M. (1971). The potential for change: Community roles. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 216–224.

      Allen, L. B. (1971). Replications of the educational park concept for the disadvantaged. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 225–232.

      Porter, O. L. (1971). Contracted school: An instrument of educational change. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 233–239.

      Agnew, D. C., & Codwell, J. E. (1971). Foundation support of education for BlackAmericans in the South. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 240–247.

      Nelsen, W. C. (1971). The storefront school: A vehicle for change. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 248–254.

      Harper, F. D. (1971). Media for change: Black students in the White university. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 255–265.

      Comer, J. P. (1971). Child development and social change: Some points of controversy. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 266–276.

      Lessinger, L. M. (1971). Educational engineering: Managing change to secure stipulated results for disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 277–281.

      Lawson, J. R. (1971). Student participation in educational change. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 282–289.

      Section C: Strategies for Educational Change

      Hesburgh, T. M. (1971). The challenge to education. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 290–296.

      Tucker, S. (1971). Black strategies for change in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 297–311.

      Volume 40Fall 1971Number 4

      Editorial

      Bolner, J., & Vedlitz, A. (1971). The affinity of Negro pupils for segregated schools: Obstacle to desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 313–321.

      Caliguri, J. P. (1971). Teacher bias in the selection of social studies textbooks. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 322–329.

      Goodstein, H. A. (1971). The use of a structured curriculum with Black preschool disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 330–336.

      Bentley, R. J. (1971). The challenge of pluralism. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 337–341.

      Totten, H. L. (1971). A survey of the academic status of Black college and university librarians. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 342–346.

      Smith, P. M., Jr. (1971). The role of the guidance counselor in the desegregation process. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 347–351.

      Carter, J. L. (1971). An analysis of the effects of a language development program with first grade children of the New Orleans Education Improvement Project. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 352–355.

      Sherman, C. E. (1971). An investigation of the interpersonal values of Negro and White junior college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 356–360.

      Wilcox, R. (1971). Further ado about Negro music ability. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 361–364.

      Coffin, B. S., Dietz, S. C., & Thompson, C. L. (1971). Academic achievement in a poverty area high school: Implications for counseling. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 365–368.

      Aspy, D. N. (1971). Better self concepts through success. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 369–372.

      Buetow, H. A. (1971). The underprivileged and Roman Catholic education. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 373–389.

      Boney, J. D., Dunn, C., & Bass, T. (1971). An analysis of the participation of racially integrated guidance groups of culturally different children in elementary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 40, 390–393.

      Volume 41Winter 1972Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1972). The little end of the tap root. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 1–3.

      Editorial

      Knight, J. H., White, K. P., & Taff, L. R. (1972). The effect of school desegregation, sex of student, and socioeconomic status on the interpersonal values of southern Negro students. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 4–11.

      Ross, C., & Swick, K. (1972). Success in the inner-city: A three-factor analysis of the impact of an experimental inner-city training program on student teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 12–15.

      Kapel, D. E., & Wexler, N. (1972). Conceptual structures of high risk Black and regular freshmen toward college related stimuli. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 16–25.

      Jones, M. J. (1972). Laboratory methods: An emphasis on the re-education of the socially disadvantaged Negro. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 26–30.

      Dales, R. J., & Keller, J. F. (1972). Self-concept scores among Black and White culturally deprived adolescent males. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 31–34.

      Gersman, E. M. (1972). The development of public education for Blacks in nineteenth century St. Louis, Missouri. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 35–47.

      Phillips, B. N. (1972). School-related aspirations of children with different sociocultural backgrounds. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 48–52.

      Powell, E. R., & White, W. F. (1972). Affect structure and achievement in a select sample of rural Negro children. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 53–56.

      Gobetz, G. E. (1972). “Race” differences in attitudes and ability among the geriatric blind. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 57–61.

      Musgrove, W. J. (1972). A follow-up study of low socio-economic Negro and White children on scholastic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 62–64.

      Muehl, S., & Muehl, L. (1972). A college-level compensatory program for educationally disadvantaged Black students: Interim findings and reflections. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 65–81.

      Kersey, H. A., Jr. (1972). The Harris School Project—A compensatory program for Negro migrant children in Florida. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 82–91.

      Volume 41Spring 1972Number 2

      Editorial

      Berman, E. H. (1972). Tuskegee-in-Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 99–112.

      Harrison, E. C. (1972). Student unrest on the Black college campus. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 113–120.

      Froe, O. D. (1972). Evaluating the achievement of the disadvantaged student. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 121–126.

      Sullivan, A. R. (1972). The influence of social processes on the learning abilities of Afro-American school children: Some educational implications. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 127–136.

      Wasserman, H. L. (1972). A comparative study of school performance among boys from broken and intact Black families. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 137–141.

      Fisher, M. D., & Turner, R. V. (1972). The effects of perceptual-motor training program upon the academic readiness of culturally disadvantaged kindergarten children. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 142–150.

      Sciara, F. (1972). A study of the acceptance of blackness among Negro boys. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 151–155.

      Payne, B. F., & Dunn, C. J. (1972). An analysis of the change in self concept by racial descent. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 156–163.

      Berk, R. A. (1972). An evaluation of a Negro history textbook versus a White history textbook, using fifth grade children. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 164–169.

      Stanfiel, J. D. (1972). Education and income of parents of students at predominantly Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 170–176.

      Volume 41Summer 1972Number 3

      Education of Disadvantaged Peoples in International Perspective

      Yearbook Number 41

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1972). The education of disadvantaged peoples in international perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 181–182.

      Editorial

      To, C. Y. (1972). Education of the Aborigines in Taiwan: An illustration of how certain traditional beliefs of a majority people determine the education of a disadvantaged minority. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 183–194.

      Wyckoff, T. (1972). Race, color, and prejudice: Solutions from three countries. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 195–201.

      Epstein, E. H. (1972). Social class, ethnicity, and academic achievement: A cross-cultural approach. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 202–215.

      Adesina, S. (1972). Power structures and education decision making in Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 216–226.

      Ireland, R. R. (1972). Education for what? A comparison of the education of Black South Africans and Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 227–240.

      Onwauchi, P. C. (1972). African peoples and western education. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 241–247.

      Newton, E. S. (1972). Linguistic pluralism: Third World impediment to universal literacy. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 248–254.

      Rogers, M. (1972). The education of children of immigrants in Britain. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 255–265.

      Parker, F. (1972). Separate schools and separate people of South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 266–275.

      Wilson, T. L. (1972). A view of developmental education and the “disadvantaged” in a national perspective: Implications for international education. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 276–290.

      Volume 41Fall 1972Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Howard, W. T. (1972). The menace to public education in America. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 291–293.

      Editorial

      Hudson, H. (1972). The Black studies program: Strategy and structure. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 294–298.

      Wilkerson, D. A. (1972). How to make educational research relevant to the urban community. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 299–302.

      Nesbitt, G. B. (1972). Time and place for teaching Black pride. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 303–308.

      Morris, E. W. (1972). The contemporary Negro college and the brain drain. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 309–319.

      Rafky, D. M. (1972). The attitudes of Black scholars toward the Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 320–330.

      Alston, J. P., & Knapp, M. J. (1972). Black attitudes toward speed of school integration, 1969. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 331–336.

      Sorensen, A. A. (1972). Black Americans and the medical profession, 1930–1970. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 337–342.

      Sorkin, A. L. (1972). Education, occupation, and income of non-White women. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 343–351.

      Rystrom, R. (1972). Teaching remedial reading to Black children: Some results. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 352–360.

      Carter, D. E., Little, C. A., & Barabasz, A. F. (1972). Comparative study of Negro and White attitudes associated with educational-occupational aspirations. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 361–364.

      Olsen, H. D. (1972). Effects of changes in academic roles on self-concept-of-academic ability of Black and White compensatory education students. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 365–369.

      Aspy, D. N., Roebuck, F. N., & Black, B. (1972). The relationship of teacher-offered conditions of respect to behaviors described by Flanders' Interaction Analysis. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 370–376.

      Greenberg, J. W., Shore, M. S., & Davidson, H. H. (1972). Caution and creativity as correlates of achievement in disparate social-racial groups. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 377–382.

      Antes, J. M., Andersen, D. W., & Reiter, J. (1972). Awareness of social issues and prejudices as it relates to a group of racially mixed disadvantaged children. The Journal of Negro Education, 41, 383–391.

      Volume 42Winter 1973Number 1

      Editorial

      Kimball, R. L., Sedlacek, W. E., & Brooks, G. C., Jr. (1973). Black and White vocational interests on Holland's Self-Directed Search (SDS). The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 1–4.

      Kindall, L. M., & McClain, E. W. (1973). The southern Black college students as adolescent: A psychohistorical study. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 5–10.

      Thorpe, C. B. (1973). An exercise in the reclamation of human resources: A study of manpower development. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 11–18.

      Levine, D. U., Fiddmont, N. S., Stephenson, R. S., & Wilkinson, C. (1973). Differences between Black youth who support the Black Panthers and the NAACP. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 19–32.

      Yee, A. H., & Fruth, M. J. (1973). Do Black studies make a difference in ghetto children's achievement and attitudes? The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 33–38.

      Gies, F. J., & Alspaugh, J. W. (1973). The measurement of teacher values concerning disadvantaged pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 39–43.

      Cordasco, F. (1973). The children of immigrants in the schools: Historical analogues of educational deprivation. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 44–53.

      Biggs, B. E., & Felton, G. S. (1973). Reducing test anxiety of collegiate Black low achievers in an academic setting. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 54–57.

      Champagne, A. M. (1973). The segregation academy and the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 58–66.

      Hardy, R. E., & Cull, J. G. (1973). Verbal dissimilarity among Black and White subjects: A prime consideration in counseling and communication. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 67–70.

      White, K., & Knight, J. H. (1973). School desegregation, socioeconomic status, sex and the aspirations of southern Negro adolescents. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 71–78.

      Dewing, R. (1973). The American Federation of Teachers and desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 79–92.

      Moses, E. G., Zirkel, P. A., & Greene, J. F. (1973). Measuring the self-concept of minority group pupils. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 93–98.

      Volume 42Spring 1973Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Miller, C. L. (1973). Walter Green Daniel: Editor, teacher, scholar, educational administrator, community leader. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 103–108.

      Editorial

      Harper, F. D. (1973). What counselors must know about the social sciences of Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 109–116.

      Picou, J. S. (1973). Black-White variations in a model of the occupational aspiration process. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 117–122.

      Asbury, C. A. (1973). Cognitive correlates of discrepant achievement in reading. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 123–133.

      Lawton, S. B. (1973). Distribution of instructional resources in Detroit. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 134–141.

      Zunino, G. J. (1973). Afro-American history curricula in the senior high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 142–163.

      Yawkey, T. D. (1973). Attitudes toward Black Americans held by rural and urban White early childhood subjects based upon multiethnic social studies materials. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 164–169.

      Littleford, M. S. (1973). Case study of a desegregation administrative policy upon a social subsystem. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 170–175.

      Alilunas, L. J. (1973). What our schools teach about Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 176–186.

      Borland, D. T. (1973). A comparative study of instructor ratings by students admitted to a “disadvantaged student” program. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 187–190.

      Mommsen, K. G. (1973). Professionalism and the racial context of career patterns among Black American doctorates: A note on the “Brain Drain” hypothesis. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 191–204.

      Esen, A. (1973). The care syndrome: A resource for counseling in Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 205–211.

      Talmage, H., & Ornstein, A. C. (1973). Teachers' perceptions of decision making roles and responsibilities in defining accountability. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 212–221.

      Volume 42Summer 1973Number 3

      Special Issue: Urban Education

      Editorial Comment

      West, E. H. (1973). Education in the Black cities. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 231–232.

      Editorial

      Davidson, E. W. (1973). Education and Black cities: Demographic background. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 233–260.

      Jones, F. C. (1973). Black Americans and the city: A historical survey. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 261–282.

      Spratlen, T. H. (1973). Financing inner city schools: Policy aspects of economics, political and racial disparity. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 283–307.

      White, L. R. (1973). Effective teachers for inner city schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 308–314.

      Battle, H. J. (1973). State involvement in the urban education crisis. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 315–321.

      Durham, J. T. (1973). Sense and nonsense about busing. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 322–335.

      Gallagher, B. G. (1973). Integrated schools in the Black cities? The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 336–350.

      Clair, J. (1973). Urban education and the exceptional child: A legal analysis. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 351–359.

      Deberry, C. E. (1973). Vocational (career) education in Black cities. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 360–378.

      Smith, S. N. (1973). Parochial schools in the Black cities. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 379–391.

      Miller, B. J. (1973). Inner city women in White schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 392–413.

      Scott, H. J. (1973). Reflections on issues and conditions related to public education for Black students. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 414–426.

      Volume 42Fall 1973Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Martin, C. A. (1973). Continuing excellence. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 427–428.

      Editorial

      Friedrichs, R. W. (1973). The impact of social factors upon scientific judgment: The “Jensen Thesis” as appraised by members of the American Psychological Association. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 429–438.

      Lunemann, A. (1973). Desegregation and achievement: A cross-sectional and semi-longitudinal look at Berkeley, California. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 439–446.

      Pandey, R. E. (1973). A comparative study of dropout at an integrated university: The 16 Personality Factor test. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 447–451.

      Cureau, H. G. (1973). The art gallery, museum: Their availability as educational resources in the historically Negro college. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 452–461.

      Lyons, J. E. (1973). The adjustment of Black students to predominantly White campuses. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 462–466.

      Samuels, S. C. (1973). An investigation into the self concepts of lower- and middle-class Black and White kindergarten children. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 467–472.

      Smith, M. D. (1973). Assessing the verbal behavior of nonstandard speakers: Some observations and proposals. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 473–488.

      Yeakey, L. H. (1973). A student without peer: The undergraduate college years of Paul Robeson. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 489–503.

      White, A. O. (1973). The Black leadership class and education in antebellum Boston. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 504–515.

      A Look at Anti-Egalitarian Research: Symposium Papers

      Asbury, C. A. (1973). The methodology used in the Jencks Report: A critique. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 530–536.

      Jones, F. C. (1973). The inequality controversy. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 537–549.

      Powell, L. (1973). Achievement motivation and emotional stability: Some omissions resulting in fallacies in the Jencks Report. The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 550–558.

      Martin, C. A. (1973). “There's more then one way to skin a cat” (The issue of heredity and anti-egalitarian research). The Journal of Negro Education, 42, 559–569.

      Volume 43Winter 1974Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Martin, C. A. (1974). Stress and the Black experience. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 1–2.

      Editorial

      Abney, E. E. (1974). The status of Florida's Black school principals. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 3–8.

      Butler, J. S. (1974). Black educators in Louisiana—A question of survival. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 9–24.

      Berlowitz, M. J. (1974). Institutional racism and school staffing in an urban area. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 25–29.

      Maynor, W., & Katzenmeyer, W. G. (1974). Academic performance and school integration: A multiethnic analysis. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 30–38.

      Mack, F. R. P. (1974). Educational opportunity program graduates compared to educational opportunity program non-graduates. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 39–46.

      McCormick, M. K., & Williams, J. H. (1974). Effects of a compensatory program on self-report, achievement, and aspiration level of “disadvantaged” high school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 47–52.

      Fitz-Gibbon, C. T. (1974). The identification of mentally gifted, “disadvantaged” students at the eighth grade level. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 53–66.

      Pfeifer, C. M., Jr., & Sedlacek, W. E. (1974). Predicting Black student grades with nonintellectual measures. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 67–76.

      Warner, K. Q. (1974). Negritude: A new dimension in the French classroom. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 77–81.

      Agee, W. H., & Smith, W. L. (1974). Modifying teachers' attitudes towards speakers of divergent dialects through inservice training. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 82–90.

      Franklin, V. P. (1974). Education for colonization: Attempts to educate free Blacks in the United States for emigration to Africa, 1823–1833. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 91–103.

      Beglis, J. F., & Sheikh, A. A. (1974). Development of the self concept in Black and White children. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 104–110.

      Elton, C. F. (1974). Black and White colleges: A comparative analysis. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 111–116.

      Tilford, M. P., & Allen, D. E. (1974). Science and non-science majors in three predominantly Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 117–126.

      Vega, M., & Powell, A. (1974). Visual defects and performance on psychological tests. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 127–130.

      Volume 43Spring 1974Number 2

      Editorial

      Rodgers, H. R., Jr., & Bullock, C. S., III. (1974). School desegregation: Successes and failures. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 139–154.

      Jones, L. (1974). Desegregation and social reform since 1954. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 155–171.

      Taylor, A. (1974). Beyond rehabilitation: The Federal City College Lorton Project—A model prison higher education program. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 172–178.

      Marascuilo, L. A., & Dagenais, F. (1974). The meaning of the word “integration” to seniors in a multi-racial high school. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 179–189.

      Bronzaft, A. L., Murgatroyd, D., Lehman, H. H., & McNeilly, R. A. (1974). Test anxiety among Black college students: A cross-cultural study. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 190–193.

      Swick, K. J. (1974). Challenging pre-service and in-service teachers' perceptions of minority group children: A review of research. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 194–201.

      Russell, J. J. (1974). Mental elaboration and cognitive performance. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 202–211.

      Carringer, D., & Wilson, C. S. (1974). The effects of sex, socioeconomic class, experimenter race, and kind of verbal reinforcement on the performance of Black children. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 212–220.

      Sciara, F. J., & Jantz, R. K. (1974). Father absence and its apparent effect on the reading achievement of Black children from low income families. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 221–227.

      Samuel, N., & Laird, D. S. (1974). The self concepts of two groups of Black female college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 228–233.

      Oberle, W. H. (1974). Role models of Black and White rural youth at two stages of adolescence. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 234–244.

      Teahan, J. E. (1974). The effect of sex and predominant socioeconomic class school climate on expectations of success among Black students. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 245–255.

      Volume 43Summer 1974Number 3

      Special Issue: Black English

      Editorial Comment

      Martin, C. A. (1974). Black English and Black history—Continuing themes. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 263–264.

      Editorial

      Bragdon, I. B. (1974). An essay on a linguistic issue: What is Black English? The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 265–274.

      McDonald, M. P. (1974). Rhyme or reason?—A microscopic view of nursery rhymes. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 275–283.

      Somervill, M. A. (1974). Language of the disadvantaged: Toward resolution of conflict. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 284–301.

      Dean, M. B., & Fowler, E. D. (1974). An argument for appreciation of dialect differences in the classroom. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 302–309.

      Greene, J. W. (1974). On rapping with the inner-city school dude. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 310–319.

      Harvey, M. L. A. (1974). Teach Spanish to Black students? Make it relevant! Make it Black! The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 320–325.

      Mckeag, R. A. (1974). Black English and implications for teachers. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 326–328.

      Williams, D. (1974). Teaching writing skills to dialectically different students. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 329–331.

      Alexander, S. C. (1974). The Black English teacher: In a quandary. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 332–336.

      Rubin, D. (1974). Inner-city high school teachers as teachers of reading: A possible solution to the dropout problem. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 337–347.

      Cato, C. A. (1974). A case for ghettoese. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 348–352.

      Coffin, G. C., Harley, E. F., & Rhodes, B. M. L. (1974). A test in Black history. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 353–379.

      Richardson, J. (1974). Black children's books: An overview. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 380–400.

      Smith, E. (1974). Phillis Wheatley: A Black perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 401–407.

      Jamison, A. (1974). Analysis of selected poetry of Phillis Wheatley. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 408–416.

      Volume 43Fall 1974Number 4

      Editorial

      Burbach, H. J., & Wagoner, J. L., Jr. (1974). Dimensions of powerlessness among Black and White high school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 419–428.

      Boone, J. A., & Adesso, V. J. (1974). Racial differences on a Black intelligence test. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 429–436.

      Warren, D. R. (1974). The U.S. Department of Education: A reconstruction promise to Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 437–451.

      Jackson, J., & Ayrer, J. (1974). Sickle cell trait and scholastic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 452–456.

      Tomberlin, J. A. (1974). Florida and the school desegregation issue, 1954–1959: A summary view. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 457–467.

      Hanson, M., & Dyer, L. (1974). Educational policy priorities and the multicultural curriculum. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 468–476.

      Newton, J. (1974). A review of Black studies as related to basic elements of curriculum. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 477–488.

      Smith, P. M., Jr. (1974). Counseling from the past and present with Blacks! The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 489–493.

      Long, S., & Long, R. (1974). Teacher-candidates' poverty perceptions. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 494–505.

      Lyons, J. E. (1974). A survey of Black Connecticut high school graduates attending out-of-state colleges and universities. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 506–511.

      Sedlacek, W. E. (1974). Issues in predicting Black student success in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 512–516.

      Giles, M. W. (1974). Measuring school desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 43, 517–523.

      Volume 44Winter 1975Number 1

      Editorial

      Deshields, S. M. (1975). The traditional approach versus the process-discovery approach to the teaching of science to urban youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 1–5.

      Andrulis, D. P., Iscoe, I., Sikes, M. P., & Friedman, T. (1975). Black professionals in predominantly White institutions of higher education—An examination of some demographic and mobility characteristics. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 6–11.

      Ehrlich, I. F. (1975). The aged Black in America—The forgotten person. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 12–23.

      Grimmett, S. A. (1975). Black and White children's free recall of unorganized and organized lists: Jensen's level I and level II. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 24–33.

      Bradfield, R. H., Hilliard, A., Palmer, B., Jones, L., Wofford, J., & Gray, B. (1975). Project B.E.A.M.: An experiment in intervention. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 34–41.

      Motz, A. B., & Hollander, E. K. (1975). When Black and White college students meet Experiences in interracial awareness. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 42–52.

      Hill, J. R. (1975). Presidential perceptions: Administrative problems and needs of public Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 53–62.

      Record, W. (1975). Can Black studies and sociology find common ground? The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 63–81.

      Banks, S. L. (1975). Blacks in a multiethnic social studies curriculum: A critical assessment. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 82–89.

      Gibbons, R. A. (1975). Analysis of the Ivory Coast educational television project. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 90–99.

      Volume 44Spring 1975Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Martin, C. A. (1975). DeFunis v. Odegaard and the Holmes memorandum—The practice of contemporary racism. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 109–112.

      Editorial

      Rosenthal, J. (1975). Southern Black student activism: Assimilation vs. nationalism. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 113–129.

      Toldson, I. L., & Pasteur, A. B. (1975). Developmental stages of Black self-discovery: Implications for using Black art forms in group interaction. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 130–138.

      Levine, D. U. (1975). Educating alienated inner-city youth: Lessons from the street academics. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 139–148.

      Borden, J. P., Wollenberg, J. P., & Handley, H. M. (1975). Extended positive effects of a comprehensive Head Start follow through program sequence on academic performance of rural disadvantaged students. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 149–160.

      Wright, W. (1975). Relationships of trust and racial perceptions toward therapist-client conditions during counseling. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 161–169.

      Smith, W. D. (1975). Black studies: Recommendations for organization and national consideration. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 170–176.

      Adeyinka, A. A. (1975). Current problems of educational development in Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 177–183.

      Toomer, J. W. (1975). Beyond being Black: Identification alone is not enough. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 184–199.

      Sikula, J. P., & Sikula, A. F. (1975). Do Black and White University interns differ in their basic values? The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 200–207.

      Volume 44Summer 1975Number 3

      Special Issue: Urban Education

      Editorial Comment

      Martin, C. A. (1975). The continuing crisis of urban education. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 225–229.

      Preface

      Arnez, N. L. (1975). Urban education—A calculated design for human waste. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 230–232.

      Editorial

      Part I: Urban Educational Problems and Policy-Making

      Sizemore, B. A. (1975). Education: Is accommodation enough? The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 233–246.

      Brown, F. (1975). Problems and promises of urban public schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 247–256.

      Phillips, W. M., Jr. (1975). Educational policy, community participation, and race. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 257–270.

      Singleton, R. (1975). The Black child and equity in school finance: Analysis and alternatives. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 271–307.

      Epps, E. G. (1975). Educational policy-making: Implications for urban schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 308–315.

      Reed, R. J. (1975). Ethnicity, social class and out-of-school educational opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 316–334.

      Part II: Program Planning in Urban Education

      Johnson, H. T. (1975). Educational planning in the Black community: Basic considerations. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 335–344.

      Brown, F., & Dixon, J. (1975). Characteristics of outstanding school programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 345–352.

      Henderson, D. H., & Washington, A. G. (1975). Cultural differences and the education of Black children: An alternative model for program development. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 353–360.

      Part III: Assessment and Evaluation in Urban Education

      Powell, L., Cameron, H. K., Asbury, C. A., & Johnson, E. H. (1975). Some characteristics of a special urban educational program. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 361–367.

      Wilson, L. S. (1975). Can an open space middle school meet the educational needs of minority youngsters? The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 368–376.

      Brown, F. (1975). Assessment and evaluation of urban schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 377–384.

      Daly, M. E. (1975). The teacher as innovator (a report on urban teacher corps, D.C. public schools). The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 385–390.

      Krumbein, E., & Beck, A. (1975). The city as a center of learning. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 391–405.

      Miller, L. P. (1975). Testing Black students: Implications for assessing inner-city schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 406–420.

      Part IV: The Administration of Urban Schools

      Townsel, C. W., & Banks, L. A. (1975). The urban school administrator—A Black perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 421–431.

      Scott, H. J. (1975). Black consciousness and professionalism. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 432–440.

      Volume 44Fall 1975Number 4

      Guest Editorial

      Jones, F. C. (1975). Title I program—Ten years later. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 441–445.

      Editorial

      Rhine, W. R., & Spencer, L. M. (1975). Effects of follow through on school fearfulness among Black children. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 446–453.

      Betts, F. M., III. (1975). Free schools and self-concept in adolescents. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 454–467.

      Craig, A. S., & Cooke, G. J. (1975). The federal government as a change agent in higher education and a Black college's response to that role. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 468–475.

      Clark, V. L., & Graham, F. B. (1975). The case for Black college sponsorship of Head Start Programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 476–481.

      Miller, S. I., & Kavanagh, J. (1975). Catholic school integration and social policy: A case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 482–492.

      Asbury, C. A. (1975). Maturity factors related to discrepant achievement of White and Black first graders. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 493–501.

      Gardner, B. T. (1975). The educational contributions of Booker T. Washington. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 502–518.

      Jones, J. C., Harris, L. J., & Hauck W. E. (1975). Differences in perceived sources of academic difficulties: Black students in predominantly Black and predominantly White colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 519–529.

      Redfering, D. L. (1975). Differential effects of group counseling with Black and White female delinquents: One year later. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 530–537.

      Okunrotifa, P. O. (1975). A pilot study of Nigerian pupils' attitude toward and achievement in a programmed unit of geography. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 538–546.

      MacDonald, A. P., Jr. (1975). Black Power. The Journal of Negro Education, 44, 547–554.

      Volume 45Winter 1976Number 1

      Editorial

      Gerber, D. A. (1976). Segregation, separatism, and sectarianism: Ohio Blacks and Wilberforce University's effort to obtain federal funds, 1891. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 1–20.

      Asbury, C. A. (1976). Why educational research is of limited use to the community. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 21–26.

      Powell, L., & Johnson, E. H. (1976). The Black MMPI [Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory] profile: Interpretive problems. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 27–36.

      Flynn, J. T., & Anderson, B. E. (1976). The effect of test administration procedures on achievement test performance. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 37–45.

      Martin, C. A. (1976). Significant trends in the development of Ghanaian education. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 46–60.

      Stanfiel, J. D. (1976). A profile of the 1972 freshman class at Howard University. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 61–69.

      Allen, B. V. (1976). The success of the EOP [Educational Opportunity Program]: A refutation of the immutability of scholastic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 70–77.

      Littleton, A. C. (1976). Research in education: Methodological and theoretical considerations. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 78–88.

      Scott, M. B. (1976). The effect of teacher perception of personality factors on the cognitive and affective learning of Black students. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 89–93.

      Larson, R. G., & Elliot, L. F. (1976). Planning and pluralism: Some dimensions of intergroup relations. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 94–101.

      Volume 45Spring 1976Number 2

      Guest Editorial

      Banks, S. L. (1976). The bicentennial and the urban condition—A Black perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 111–116.

      Editorial

      Gordon, M. A. (1976). An analysis of enrollment data for Black students in institutions of higher education, from 1940–1972. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 117–121.

      Mackler, B. (1976). Cooling out the community: The politics of compensatory education. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 122–133.

      Medley, M. L., & Johnsen, K. P. (1976). The economics of college plans among Black high school seniors. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 134–140.

      Boykin, A. O. (1976). The racial balance policy: An appeal to the common good. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 141–149.

      Banks, W. (1976). Drugs, hyperactivity, and Black schoolchildren. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 150–160.

      Erwin, J. (1976). The attitudes of Black “new students” and administrative response. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 161–165.

      Polsky, M. (1976). The American slave narrative: Dramatic resource material for the classroom. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 166–178.

      Homel, M. W. (1976). The politics of public education in Black Chicago, 1910–1941. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 179–191.

      Nunez, E. (1976). Could Shakespeare have known? The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 192–196.

      Morin, A. (1976). Do educational films produced with same-race-communicators promote learning? The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 197–203.

      Greene, J. W. (1976). Did Black colleges kill dial access? The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 204–211.

      Volume 45Summer 1976Number 3

      Guest Editorial

      Sims, W. E. (1976). Black colleges—Bicentennial offers little hope. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 219–224.

      Editorial

      Lynch, A. R. (1976). Paul Robeson: His dreams know no frontiers. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 225–234.

      Hornburger, J. M. (1976). Deep are the roots: Busing in Boston. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 235–245.

      Livingston, T. W. (1976). The exportation of American higher education to West Africa: Liberia College, 1850–1900. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 246–262.

      Adeyinka, A. A. (1976). Local community efforts in the development of secondary grammar school education in the western state of Nigeria, 1925–1955. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 263–274.

      Adejunmobi, S. A. (1976). Problems of education in Dahomey—A Nigerian view. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 275–283.

      Asgill, A. (1976). The importance of accreditation: Perceptions of Black and White college presidents. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 284–294.

      Tucker, M. B., & Yates, J. F. (1976). Success expectations and preferences for individual and collaborative learning among Black and White college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 295–305.

      Banks, G. P. (1976). The effects of empathy training on staff members of a community based vocational development program for Black students. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 306–311.

      Kleinbaum, D. G., & Kleinbaum, A. (1976). The minority experience at a predominantly White university—A report of a 1972 survey at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 312–328.

      Miller, M. S. (1976). Black intelligence still on trial. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 329–333.

      Warnat, W. I. (1976). The role of White faculty on the Black college campus. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 334–338.

      Schab, F. (1976). The work ethic among Black secondary students in the South—A summary report. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 339–341.

      Leffall, D. C., & Sims, J. L. (1976). Mary McLeod Bethune—The educator; also including a selected annotated bibliography. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 342–359.

      Volume 45Fall 1976Number 4

      Editorial Comment

      Martin, C. A. (1976). “Simple justice”—A significant historical reminder. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 361–364.

      Editorial

      Meyer, L. E. (1976). Oppression or opportunity? Inside the Black universities of South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 365–382.

      Ray, L. R., Jr. (1976). Black studies: A discussion of evaluation. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 383–396.

      Jones, R. S. (1976). Community participation as pedagogy: Its effects on political attitudes of Black students. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 397–407.

      Edwards, O. L. (1976). Components of academic success: A profile of achieving Black adolescents. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 408–422.

      Hunt, T. C. (1976). The schooling of immigrants and Black Americans: Some similarities and differences. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 423–431.

      Sorkin, A. L. (1976). The economic and social status of the American Indian, 1940–1970. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 432–447.

      Burbach, H. J., & Bridgemen, B. (1976). Dimensions of self-concept among Black and White fifth grade children. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 448–458.

      Sola, P. A., & Gardner, B. T. (1976). ATEP: An “alternate approach” to the training of teachers at the University of Illinois. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 459–471.

      Deonanan, C. R. (1976). Education and imperialism. The Journal of Negro Education, 45, 472–478.

      Volume 46Winter 1977Number 1

      Guest Editorial

      Everett, J. R., & Johnson, J. (1977). Patents—Potential economic benefits for universities and researchers. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 1–6.

      Editorial

      Cole, B. (1977). Appropriation politics and Black schools: Howard University in the U.S. Congress, 1879–1928. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 7–23.

      Amprey, J. L., & Gilbert, A. C. F. (1977). Attitudes of Black and White college students toward student personnel services. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 24–30.

      Washington, K. R. (1977). An analysis of the attitudes of White prospective teachers toward the inner-city schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 31–38.

      Carey, P. (1977). Engineering education and the Black community: A case for concern. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 39–45.

      McGee, L., & McAfee, D. (1977). Role of the traditionally Black public institution of higher learning in extension education. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 46–52.

      Johnson, S. O. (1977). A study of the perceptions of Black administrators concerning the role of the Black principal in Florida during the period 1973–78. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 53–61.

      Cummings, S. (1977). Family socialization and fatalism among Black adolescents. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 62–75.

      Anderson, C., & Cromwell, R. L. (1977). “Black is beautiful” and the color preferences of Afro-American youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 76–88.

      Volume 46Spring 1977Number 2

      Editorial

      Adams, R. L. (1977). Black studies perspectives. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 99–117.

      Johnson, W. B., & Nichols, T. (1977). Black studies: A key to the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 118–123.

      Clarke, A. (1977). Ethnic studies: Reflection and re-examination. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 124–132.

      Harper, F. D. (1977). Developing a curriculum of self-esteem for Black youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 133–140.

      Hare, B. R. (1977). Black and White child self-esteem in social science: An overview. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 141–156.

      Joubert, P. E., & Crouch, B. M. (1977). Mississippi Blacks and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 157–167.

      Nam, T. Y. (1977). A manifesto of the Black student activists in a southern Black college under the integration order. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 168–185.

      Volume 46Summer 1977Number 3

      Guest Editorial

      Kerina, M. (1977). Independence in Namibia—An urgent reality. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 197–201.

      Editorial

      Zungu, Y. (1977). The education for Africans in South Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 202–218.

      Nwacukwu, C. (1977). Issues and problems of financing education in Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 219–229.

      Jackson, G. G. (1977). The emergence of a Black perspective in counseling. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 230–253.

      Hamilton, E. (1977). Black colleges: Opportunity for non-traditional study. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 254–263.

      Starr, G. D., Sr., & Medlin, W. K. (1977). Analysis of continuing education for planning community development. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 264–277.

      Glantz, O. (1977). Locus of control and aspiration to traditionally open and traditionally closed occupations. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 278–290.

      Carruthers, I. E. (1977). Centennials of Black miseducation: A study of White educational management. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 291–304.

      Howard, V. B. (1977). The struggle for equal education in Kentucky, 1866–1884. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 305–328.

      Chachere, E. G., & Elliot, R. J. (1977). Perceptual dissonance and inner-city education. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 329–333.

      Vinson, A. W. (1977). An investigation concerning personality characteristics, classroom climate, and academic achievement. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 334–343.

      Guichard, C. P., & Connolly, M. A. (1977). Ethnic group stereotypes: A new look at an old problem. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 344–357.

      Green, D. S. (1977). W. E. B. Du Bois' Talented Tenth: A strategy for racial advancement. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 358–366.

      Volume 46Fall 1977Number 4

      Guest Editorial

      Evans, T. E. (1977). Reverse discrimination in medical education. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 373–379.

      Editorial

      Young, H. A., & Young, B. H. (1977). Science and Black studies. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 380–387.

      Dennis, R. M. (1977). Du Bois and the role of the educated elite. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 388–402.

      Kelley, D. Q. (1977). The political economy of Booker T. Washington: A bibliographic essay. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 403–418.

      Holder, T., & Hicks, L. (1977). Increasing the competencies of teachers and counselors with systematic interpersonal skills training. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 419–424.

      Hornburger, J. M. (1977). Reflections on teacher training programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 425–429.

      King, J., Jr. (1977). The perceptions of Black high school students toward vocational and technical education programs. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 430–442.

      Nichols, N. J., & McKinney, A. W. (1977). Black or White socio-economically Disadvantaged pupils—They aren't necessarily inferior. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 443–449.

      Perney, L. R., Hyde, E. M., & Machock, B. J. (1977). Black intelligence—A re-evaluation. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 450–455.

      Mangieri, J. N., & Olsen, H. D. (1977). Self-concept-of-achievement ability and reading proficiency of Black and White males in an adult education course. The Journal of Negro Education, 46, 456–461.

      Volume 47Winter 1978Number 1

      Special Issue: Desegregation in the 1970s: A Candid Discussion

      Introduction

      Martin, C. A. (1978). Introduction. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 1.

      Editorial

      Jones, F. C. (1978). Ironies of school desegregation. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 2–27.

      Arnez, N. L. (1978). Implementation of desegregation as a discriminatory process. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 28–45.

      Jones, L. (1978). School desegregation in retrospect and prospect. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 46–57.

      Sizemore, B. A. (1978). Educational research and desegregation: Significance for the Black community. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 58–68.

      Asbury, C. A. (1978). An essay on the proper relation between testing and school desegregation: A non-technical opinion. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 69–71.

      Sampson, W. A., & Williams, B. (1978). School desegregation: The non-traditional sociological perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 72–80.

      Gerken, K. C. (1978). What have we been doing? (Black school psychologists and the desegregation issue). The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 81–87.

      Haney, J. E. (1978). The effects of the Brown decision on Black educators. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 88–95.

      Aldridge, D. P. (1978). Litigation and education of Blacks: A look at the U.S. Supreme Court. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 96–112.

      Volume 47Spring 1978Number 2

      Special Focus: Federal Law and Discrimination in the North and Increasing Opportunities for Black Students in Higher Education

      Focus Articles

      Bullock, C. S., III. (1978). Federal law and school discrimination in the North. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 113–131.

      Falk, W. W. (1978). Mobility attitudes of segregated and desegregated Black youths. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 132–142.

      Reed, R. J. (1978). Increasing the opportunities for Black students in higher education. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 143–150.

      Travis, C. B., & Anthony, S. E. (1978). Some psychological consequences of integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 151–158.

      General Articles

      Crew, J. L., Sr., & Whitney, E. N. (1978). Criterion-referenced testing: Usages in some member systems of the council of great city schools. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 159–167.

      McPhail, I. P. (1978). A psycholinguistic approach to training urban high school students in test-taking strategies. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 168–176.

      Williams, L. N., & El-Khawas, M. (1978). A philosophy of Black education. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 177–191.

      Colquit, J. L. (1978). The teacher's dilemma in facilitating the Black experience. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 192–200.

      Parker, R. N. (1978). Usefulness of Piagetian theory in formulating a preschool program for Black children. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 201–204.

      Volume 47Summer 1978Number 3

      Editorial

      VanGundy, A. B., & Haynes, L. L., III. (1978). A comparison of college presidents using Fiedler's contingency model. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 215–229.

      Allen, W. R. (1978). Race, family setting, and adolescent achievement orientation. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 230–243.

      Humphrey, C. A., & Allen, D. E. (1978). Educational and social needs in small all-Black towns. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 244–255.

      Aseltine, G. P. (1978). Family socialization perceptions among Black and White high school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 256–265.

      Williams, J. E., & Ladd, R. (1978). On the relevance of education for Black liberation. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 266–282.

      Bell, E. V. (1978). A peer mediated approach to drug education. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 283–289.

      Waller, R. L. (1978). Teaching ethnic studies in selected Memphis City junior high schools, 1973–74. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 290–297.

      Obanya, P. (1978). Curricular interests of a group of Nigerian secondary school students. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 298–302.

      Makinde, O. (1978). Historical foundations of counseling in Africa. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 303–311.

      Volume 47Fall 1978Number 4

      Guest Editorial

      Fort, E. (1978). Around the bend from Bakkeism. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 317–322.

      Editorial

      Smith, C. H. (1978). The peculiar status of Black administrators in educational institutions. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 323–327.

      Williams, J. H., & Muehl, S. (1978). Relations among student and teacher perceptions of behavior. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 328–336.

      Asbury, C. A. (1978). Cognitive factors related to discrepant arithmetic achievement of White and Black first graders. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 337–342.

      Boykin, A. W. (1978). Psychological/behavioral verve in academic/task performance: Pre-theoretical considerations. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 343–354.

      Phillips, R. E. (1978). John Dewey visits the ghetto. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 355–362.

      Middleton, E. J. (1978). The Louisiana Education Association, 1901–1970. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 363–378.

      Dewing, R. (1978). The NEA [National Education Association] and minority rights. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 379–384.

      Wright, S. H. (1978). Patterns of library use in a remedial pre-college program. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 385–394.

      Fotion, J. C., Bolden, W. M., & Fotion, N. (1978). Political attitudes of students in three predominantly Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 395–401.

      Rigsby, G. (1978). Phillis Wheatley's craft as reflected in her revised elegies. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 402–413.

      Boozer, B. (1978). An alternative to intelligence testing for minority children. The Journal of Negro Education, 47, 414–418.

      Volume 48Winter 1979Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Jones, F. C. (1979). On meaning—Individuals and their groupness. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 1–5.

      Editorial

      Thomas, C. L. (1979). Relative effectiveness of high school grades for predicting college grades: Sex and ability level effects. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 6–13.

      Hurley, O. L., Hirshoren, A., Hunt, J. T., & Kavale, K. (1979). Predictive validity of two mental ability tests with Black deaf children. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 14–19.

      Cooper, B. L. (1979). Popular music: An untapped resource for teaching contemporary Black history. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 20–36.

      Babbitt, C. E., & Burbach, H. J. (1979). Perceptions of social control among Black college students. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 37–42.

      Emoungu, P.-A. (1979). Socioeducational ideologies of Black education. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 43–56.

      Swanson, A. D. (1979). An international perspective on social science research and school integration. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 57–66.

      Irvine, R. W. (1979). Structure of school, personality and high school dropouts. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 67–72.

      Richardson, J. M. (1979). Francis L. Cardozo: Black educator during reconstruction. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 73–83.

      Mielenz, C. C. (1979). Non-prejudiced Caucasian parents and attitudes of their children toward Negroes. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 84–91.

      Anderson, W., Jr., Frierson, H., & Lewis, T. (1979). Black survival in White academe. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 92–102.

      Volume 48Spring 1979Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Jones, F. C. (1979). Walking backward into the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 111–112.

      Editorial

      Levesque, G. A. (1979). Before integration: The forgotten years of Jim Crow education in Boston. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 113–125.

      West, E. H. (1979). The Harris brothers: Black northern teachers in the reconstruction South. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 126–138.

      Harris, R. A., Jr. (1979). The applicability of Parsons' theory of the social system to Blacks in urban places. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 139–148.

      Campbell, R. L., Williams, W. E., & Sutton, E. (1979). Black student teachers' self-concept and attitudes toward their training program. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 149–155.

      Walters, R., & Smith, R. (1979). The Black education strategy in the 1970s. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 156–170.

      Protinsky, R. A., & Wildman, T. M. (1979). Roots: Reflections from the classroom. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 171–181.

      Wyche, L. G. (1979). A critique of studies on the effect of social experience on language development. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 182–186.

      Lawson, H. A. (1979). Physical education and sport in the Black community: The hidden perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 187–195.

      Shields, P. H. (1979). The language of poor Black children and reading performance. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 196–208.

      Henderson, R. D. (1979). Input to educational decision-makers: A missing perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 209–215.

      King, E., & Price, F. T. (1979). Black self-concept: A new perspective. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 216–221.

      Volume 48Summer 1979Number 3

      Multicultural Education in the International Year of the Child: Problems and Possibilities

      Yearbook Number 48

      Editorial Comment

      Jones, F. C. (1979). Implementing multiculturalism—The challenge to educators in the International Year of the Child. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 233–234.

      Guest Editorial

      Grant, C. A. (1979). To Su-Lin and Mai-Lin Cheng in remembrance of their father, Charles W. Cheng, 1937–1979. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 235–236.

      Editorial

      Part I: Policy Issues and Trends

      Banks, J. A. (1979). Shaping the future of multicultural education. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 237–252.

      Baker, G. C. (1979). Policy issues in multicultural education in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 253–266.

      Cheng, C. W., Brizendine, E., & Oakes, J. (1979). What is “an equal chance” for minority children? The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 267–287.

      Part II: Review of Research

      Clark, V. L. (1979). Revelations, responses, refinement—An overview of the research pertaining to the young child, 1960–79. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 288–305.

      Smith, S. N. (1979). Recent cross-ethnic research on the adolescent. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 306–323.

      Part III: Curriculum and Schooling

      Gay, G. (1979). On behalf of children: A curriculum design for multicultural education in the elementary school. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 324–340.

      Sizemore, B. A. (1979). The Four M curriculum: A way to shape the future. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 341–356.

      Clasen, R. E. (1979). Models for the educational needs of gifted children in a multicultural context. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 357–363.

      Sapon-Shevin, M. (1979). Mainstreaming: Implementing the spirit of the law. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 364–381.

      Butterfield, R. A., Demos, E. S., Grant, G. W., Moy, P. S., & Perez, A. L. (1979). A multicultural analysis of a popular basal reading series in the International Year of the Child. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 382–389.

      Bowen, E. M., & Salsman, F. L. (1979). Integrating multiculturalism into a teacher-training program. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 390–395.

      Part IV: Problem Areas Affecting Children

      Hankerson, H. E. (1979). Children in crisis in the United States: Child abuse and neglect—A continuing problem. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 396–407.

      Williams, H. B., & Williams, E. (1979). Some aspects of childrearing practices in three minority subcultures in the United States. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 408–418.

      Part V: Directions for Change

      Barnes, W. J. (1979). Developing a culturally pluralistic perspective: A community involvement task. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 419–430.

      Grant, C. A. (1979). Education that is multicultural as a change agent: Organizing for effectiveness. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 431–446.

      Volume 48Fall 1979Number 4

      Guest Editorial

      Wright, S. J. (1979). Editorial Comment: Charles H. Thompson—Founder and seminal editor-in-chief of The Journal of Negro Education. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 447–448.

      Editorial

      Spratlen, T. H. (1979). The Bakke decision: Implications for Black educational and professional opportunities. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 449–456.

      Cytrynbaum, S., & Conran, P. C. (1979). Multiple task and boundary management in the interracial college classroom. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 457–478.

      Smith, E. J. (1979). Reference group perspectives of middle-class Black workers and college bound Black youth. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 479–487.

      Feinman, S. (1979). Trends in racial self-image of Black children: Psychological consequences of a social movement. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 488–499.

      Pink, W. T., Freund, E. H., & Stormo, E. G. (1979). A resocialization strategy for Black Vietnam veterans. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 500–512.

      Aguolu, C. C. (1979). The role of ethnicity in Nigerian education. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 513–529.

      Amadi, L. E. (1979). Public education edict, 1970: Educational transition in East Central State, Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education, 48, 530–543.

      Educational Development Years (1980–1989)
      Volume 49Winter 1980Number 1

      Editorial Comment

      Jones, F. C. (1980). Unintended consequences. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 1–2.

      Editorial

      Fendrich, J. M., & Smith, C. U. (1980). Black activists: Ten years later. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 3–19.

      Bracy, R., Jr. (1980). The Black private college and strategies for its survival. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 20–25.

      Ball, H. G., & Bonner, L. W. (1980). Human resources research center: A much needed vehicle. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 26–30.

      Jones, C. B. (1980). Criminal justice education in predominantly Black colleges. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 31–40.

      Gresson, A. D. (1980). The “educational pathologist” in Black special education. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 41–51.

      Turner, J., & McGann, C. S. (1980). Black studies as an integral tradition in African-American intellectual history. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 52–59.

      Mackler, B. (1980). Cooperation and community: Reflections on a model for urban education. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 60–65.

      Harris, C. E. (1980). An analysis of three political models of community control. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 66–76.

      Daniel, J. H. (1980). Black graduate students' choice of future work settings. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 77–84.

      Hendricks, R. E., & Redlhammer, P. R. (1980). Educational change in the islands: An assessment of Bahamian trends. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 85–90.

      McCain, J. A. (1980). National development and higher education in Ghana. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 91–96.

      Conwill, W. L. (1980). The inheritance of IQ and scholastic achievement: Further comments on the Jensen article. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 97–104.

      Volume 49Spring 1980Number 2

      Editorial Comment

      Jones, F. C. (1980). In memoriam: Charles H. Thompson (1896–1980). The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 113–114.

      Editorial

      Beck, W. W., Linden, G. M., & Siegel, M. E. (1980). Identifying school desegregation leadership styles. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 115–133.

      Carter, D. E., & Walsh, J. A. (1980). Father absence and the Black child: A multivariate analysis. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 134–143.

      Marion, R. L. (1980). A cooperative university/public school approach to sensitizing majority teachers to the needs of parents of Black EMR children. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 144–153.

      Oliver, J. (1980). The developmental process and outcome of an alternative school: A case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 154–164.

      Ridley, S. E., & Bayton, J. A. (1980). Personality needs, social status, and preferences for an “ideal woman” in Black and White college males. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 165–172.

      Weigert, K. M. (1980). Ideological eclecticism and coherence among Black soldiers: A research note. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 173–183.

      Proctor, R. (1980). Early developments in Barbadian education. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 184–195.

      Onokerhoraye, A. G. (1980). A spatial theory for locating educational institutions in tropical Africa with special reference to Nigeria. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 196–202.

      Okoh, S. E. N. (1980). Education as a source of economic growth and development—An essay. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 203–206.

      Onwere, G. O. (1980). Factors associated with interest in science of West African students in Washington D.C. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 207–214.

      Adesua, A. (1980). Vocational education in two Nigerian secondary schools: A case study. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 215–219.

      Volume 49Summer 1980Number 3

      Critical Issues in Testing and Achievement of Black Americans

      Yearbook Number 49

      Guest Editorial

      Cameron, H. K. (1980). Critical issues in testing and achievement of Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 229–232.

      Editorial

      Weiss, T. (1980). National truth-in-testing legislation. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 233–237.

      Green, R. L., & Griffore, R. J. (1980). The impact of standardized testing on minority students. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 238–252.

      Johnson, S. T. (1980). Major issues in measurement today—Their implications for Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 253–262.

      Williams, R. L., Dotson, W., Don, P., & Williams, W. S. (1980). The war against testing: A current status report. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 263–273.

      Lindsay, B. (1980). Educational testing in Kenya. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 274–288.

      Tidwell, R. (1980). The biasing potential of multiple-choice test distractors. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 289–296.

      Popham, W. J. (1980). Criterion-referenced tests for Black Americans. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 297–305.

      Abramowitz, E. A. (1980). Educational policy considerations of competency-based testing. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 306–311.

      Coffman, W. E. (1980). The testing of educational achievement in children. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 312–325.

      Brown, D. R. (1980). Occupational credentialing: Help or hindrance? The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 326–336.

      Bloom, B. S. (1980). The new direction in educational research: Alterable variables. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 337–349.

      Gordon, E. W., & Rubain, T. J. (1980). Bias and alternatives in psychological testing. The Journal of Negro Education, 49, 350–360.

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