Content Analysis

Major Works

Edited by: Roberto Franzosi

  • View Hide Publication Details
    • Publisher: SAGE Publications Ltd |
    • Publication Year: 2008 |
    • Online Publication Date: January 15, 2013 |
    • DOI: 10.4135/9781446271308 |
    • Print ISBN: 9781412933995 |
    • Online ISBN: 9781446271308 |
    • Series: SAGE Benchmarks in Social Research Methods |
    • Print Purchase Options

Abstract

Content Analysis is a popular social science technique for the analysis of text data. While early examples trace back to the late 19th and early 20th century, the technique came of age during the Second World War through the efforts of Lasswell and others aimed at decoding enemy propaganda. This major work brings together the most significant methodological contributions and substantive applications ever published on Content Analysis. Students and scholars in sociology, political science, journalism and mass communication, and business and management will find in this major work a unique and comprehensive overview of the technique and its applications.

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Overview
  • Key Readings
  • Content Analysis: Objective, Systematic, and Quantitative Description of Content
    RobertoFranzosi

    By the time of the publication of the first general textbook in content analysis in 1952 (Berelson's Content Analysis in Communication Research), the basic ingredients of the new methodology had all been worked out. And so had the rhetorical format of introducing the technique through a list of definitions by various authors - we will find that same format in later textbooks from Holsti to Krippendorff, and in various accounts of the development of content analysis from Shapiro and Markoff to Franzosi.1 Sticking to this format, the following early definitions2 leave no doubt about the quantitative nature of the technique:

    “[the method of] quantitative content analysis … consists of tabulating the occurrences of content units …”

    “Content analysis ...

    Looks like you do not have access to this content.

    Please login via your institution.

    Click here for free trial login.

  • Looks like you do not have access to this content.

    Please login via your institution.

    Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top