The Supreme Court A to Z

Encyclopedias

Edited by: Kenneth Jost

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Entries A-Z
  • Front Matter
  • Back Matter
    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • I
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • P
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • T
    • U
    • V
    • W
    • X
    • Y
    • Z

    • Copyright

      View Copyright Page

      About the Author

      Kenneth Jost is the Supreme Court editor for CQ Press and associate editor of CQ Researcher. He is an honors graduate of Harvard College and Georgetown University Law Center, where he teaches media law as an adjunct professor. Jost has covered legal affairs as a reporter, editor, or columnist since 1970 and has contributed to a variety of legal publications. He has been writing CQ Press's Supreme Court Yearbook series since 1992. Jost is a frequent television and radio commentator on the Supreme Court and legal affairs. He was a member of the CQ Researcher team that won the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award in 2002 for magazine coverage of law and justice issues. He covers and comments on legal affairs in the blog Jost on Justice (http://jostonjustice.blogspot.com).

      About this Book

      The Supreme Court A to Z is part of CQ Press's five-volume American Government A to Z series, which provides essential information about the history, powers, and operations of the three branches of government, the election of representatives and other officials, and the nation's most important document, the Constitution. In these comprehensive, ready-reference encyclopedias, CQ Press writers and editors present engaging insight and nontechnical analysis about the U.S. government. The series is useful to anyone who has an interest in national government and politics.

      The Supreme Court A to Z offers accessible information about the Supreme Court, including its history, traditions, organization, dynamics, and personalities. The entries in The Supreme Court A to Z are arranged alphabetically and are extensively cross-referenced to related information in the volume. This book also offers updated reference materials covering historic milestones of the Supreme Court, Court nominations, a seat chart of the justices, the U.S. Constitution, and online sources of decisions. It also includes a bibliography to help simplify research and a detailed index.

      This fifth edition of The Supreme Court A to Z has been thoroughly updated to incorporate coverage of significant new cases and recent changes on the bench and includes more than 360 alphabetized entries. Presented in an engaging, reader-friendly design, this edition includes biographies of recently appointed Associate Justices Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor; a new entry on media and the Court, which highlights the Court's online presence; a major revision of the entry on the right to bear arms, which encompasses the two Supreme Court decisions establishing a right to personal possession of firearms; and updated entries on other key issues and concepts, including abortion, campaigns and elections, civil rights, class action, due process, freedom of the press, reapportionment and redistricting, school desegregation, and war powers.

      Preface

      Justices Sandra Day O'Connor (1981–2006) and Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1993–) served on the Supreme Court together for twelve years. Even late in their tenures together, however, male lawyers occasionally misspoke by addressing Ginsburg as “Justice O'Connor” or O'Connor as Ginsburg.

      The mistakes happened so often that the justices were once presented with T-shirts that read, “I'm Ruth, not Sandra,” and vice versa. But Ginsburg, a leading advocate for women's equality before her appointment to a federal appeals court in 1980, found the slip-ups less than amusing. The misidentifications, she complained, were a symptom of the still incomplete acceptance of women in the judiciary. And after O'Connor retired in 2005, Ginsburg acknowledged that she felt lonely as the only woman among the nine justices.

      Not any more. With President Barack Obama's appointments of Sonia Sotomayor in 2009 and Elena Kagan in 2010, the Supreme Court started its new term on October 4, 2010, with three female justices for the first time in history. After the term ended, Ginsburg said the year “felt distinctly different” with two women as colleagues. “I like the idea that we're all over the bench,” Ginsburg told USA Today's Joan Biskupic. “It says women are here to stay.”

      Ginsburg was less pleased, however, by the course of decisions during the year, the sixth term for the still young chief justice, John G. Roberts Jr. (2005–). Sotomayor and Kagan settled comfortably into the Court's liberal wing with Ginsburg and the fourth Democratic-appointed justice, Stephen G. Breyer. But they found themselves outvoted in many of the year's most closely watched cases by a conservative majority consisting of Roberts and four other Republican appointees: Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel A. Alito Jr.

      Despite the votes of all three female justices, the Court dealt a severe blow to a class action lawsuit charging Wal-Mart, the giant discount retailer, with a nationwide policy of discriminating against female employees in regard to pay and promotions. In another case, the Court effectively allowed companies to use boilerplate arbitration agreements to block customers from converting individual complaints into broad class actions. Both rulings came on 5–4 votes split along conservative–liberal lines.

      The conservative bloc displayed its aversion to litigation in several other rulings that made it harder for plaintiffs to recover damages for corporate or official misconduct. In another 5–4 decision, the Court threw out a $14 million jury award won by a former Louisiana death row inmate whose murder conviction had been overturned because of prosecutorial misconduct. The majority found insufficient evidence of a broad pattern of misconduct by the Orleans Parish district attorney's office. In a forceful dissent, Ginsburg argued that what she called the “flagrant” misconduct in the case was “a foreseeable consequence of lax training” of the office's trial prosecutors.

      The conservative majority flexed its muscles in other rulings that reflected signature themes of the Roberts Court. The Court invoked the First Amendment to strike down a provision of Arizona's public campaign financing system that increased the funds for participating candidates if a privately financed opponent spent above a specified amount. The ruling came one year after a landmark decision that granted corporations and unions a First Amendment right to spend unlimited sums in political campaigns.

      That ruling drew sharp retorts from, among others, President Barack Obama, who criticized the decision in his 2010 State of the Union address with six of the justices seated just below him in the House of Representatives chamber. Democrats in the chamber applauded Obama; Republicans sat on their hands. Two months later, Roberts suggested to a law school audience that perhaps the justices should sit out the State of the Union address because it had “degenerated into a political pep rally.” But six of the justices were again in attendance for Obama's annual address in 2011, this time with no criticism of the Court from the president.

      The Supreme Court has engendered sharp partisan and ideological debates throughout its history. The Court's rulings under Chief Justice John Marshall (1801–1835) supporting broad powers of the national government drew criticism from supporters of states’ rights, including the former president, Thomas Jefferson. The Court shifted toward states rights under Chief Justice Roger Taney (1835–1864) and came under fire for pro-slavery rulings, including the notorious Dred Scott decision in 1857. The anti-slavery critics of that decision included the future president, Abraham Lincoln.

      The post–Civil War Court steered a conservative course on social and economic issues, limiting the scope of Reconstruction-era civil rights laws and later gutting the first federal antitrust law and throwing out the federal income tax. The conservative era continued into the 1930s when the Court struck down several laws Congress passed as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. FDR misfired in 1937 with his controversial “Court-packing plan,” but succeeded, with appointments over the next six years, in creating a liberal majority that backed broad federal powers in economic affairs and expanded definitions of civil and constitutional rights.

      The Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren (1953–1969) attracted intense political criticism with decisions that outlawed racial segregation, revolutionized criminal justice, and mandated reapportionment of state legislatures. Fulfilling a campaign promise, President Richard M. Nixon reoriented the Court with four conservative appointments, including a new chief justice, Warren E. Burger (1969–1986). The Burger Court limited without overturning many of the controversial Warren Court decisions. But it touched off a new, fierce debate over the Court's role with the 1973 decision, Roe v. Wade, that guaranteed a woman's right to an abortion during most of her pregnancy.

      Political controversies continued to envelop the Court through the final decades of the twentieth and the first decades of the twenty-first centuries. The Court steered further to the right under Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist (1986–2005) and now under Roberts, who was a law clerk for Rehnquist before serving in government under two Republican presidents, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. President George W. Bush's appointments of Roberts and Alito—like Roberts a veteran of the Reagan-era Justice Department—fortified the Court's conservative majority.

      Under Roberts, the Court has cheered conservative groups by upholding a federal ban on so-called partial birth abortions, limiting affirmative action policies by school districts and public employers, and recognizing an individual right to possess firearms under the Second Amendment. But the Court is not ideologically monolithic. With Kennedy providing the critical vote, the liberal bloc has prevailed in rulings that guaranteed judicial review for suspected terrorists held at Guantánamo, barred life-without-parole sentences for juvenile offenders, and upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's power to regulate climate-changing greenhouse gases. And the justices have been more nearly unified in several free-speech rulings, including the 2011 decision that recognized a First Amendment right for protests at military funerals.

      The political and ideological debates over the Court's decisions have fed into increasingly contentious fights in the Senate over nominees to the Court. Despite impressive professional credentials, Alito, Sotomayor, and Kagan each won Senate confirmation in relatively close votes split along party lines.

      From all accounts, the partisan fights outside the Court have not spilled over into the justices’ personal relationships. “I've never heard a voice raised in that conference room in seventeen years,” Breyer said in a speech to the American Bar Association in August 2011. Thomas, who marked twenty years on the Court in fall 2011, has similarly said that he has yet to hear “an unkind word” in the justices’ private conferences. In his speech to the lawyers, Breyer emphasized the need for civility in public life. “Every one of us is in a position to teach the importance of civility, education, and the rule of law,” he said.

      The collegiality among the justices was a sharp contrast to political relations in the rest of Washington in summer 2011. President Obama and congressional Republicans fought fiercely over legislation needed to raise the federal debt ceiling and avert an unprecedented government default. Tortuous closed-door negotiations failed to produce an agreement until the last minute. Polls showed sharp drops afterward in public approval of both Obama and Congress.

      The Supreme Court, on the other hand, appeared to continue to enjoy relatively high confidence from the public. A Gallup poll in June 2011 found that 47 percent of those responding approved of the way the Court was handling its job, while 34 percent disapproved. In a decade of similar polls, Gallup only once found a plurality disapproval of the Court's performance: 48 percent to 42 percent in June 2005. That survey was conducted in the very week of the Court's controversial ruling upholding a municipality's right to take private property through eminent domain and turn it over to private developers for economic redevelopment.

      The Court's ability to maintain public confidence despite dealing with issues on which public opinion was sharply divided testifies to the Framers’ wisdom in establishing the judiciary as an independent check on the other branches of the federal government and on the states. In The Federalist Papers, No. 78, Alexander Hamilton famously described the judiciary in 1788 as “the least dangerous” of the three branches of the government to be established under the new Constitution. The judiciary, Hamilton explained, would not have the power of the purse or the power of the sword—only the power of judgment. Yet the Court's judgment has stood for more than two centuries as a powerful instrument for holding the other branches to account and for protecting individual rights, just as Hamilton envisioned. In an era of intense partisanship and political conflict, that power—the power of law and justice—is all the more important to the nation's strength and stability.

      Kenneth Jost

      January 2012

      List of Entries

    • Appendix

      Historic Milestones of the Court

      Appendix

      Supreme Court Nominations, 1789–2011

      Supreme Court Nominations, 1789–2011

      Appendix

      Seat Chart of the Justices

       

       

      Constitution of the United States

      We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

      Article I

      Section 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

      Section 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.

      No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.

      [Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons.]1 The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three.

      When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.

      The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.

      Section 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, [chosen by the Legislature thereof,]2 for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.

      Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third may be chosen every second Year; [and if Vacancies happen by Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.]3

      No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen.

      The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided.

      The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United States.

      The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present.

      Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law.

      Section 4. The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.

      The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall [be on the first Monday in December],4 unless they shall by Law appoint a different Day.

      Section 5. Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such Penalties as each House may provide.

      Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member.

      Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the Journal.

      Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.

      Section 6. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.

      No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office.

      Section 7. All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills.

      Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in which Case it shall not be a Law.

      Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the Case of a Bill.

      Section 8. The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;

      To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;

      To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;

      To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;

      To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures;

      To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;

      To establish Post Offices and post Roads;

      To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

      To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

      To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offences against the Law of Nations;

      To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;

      To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years;

      To provide and maintain a Navy;

      To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;

      To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;

      To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;

      To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings;—And

      To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

      Section 9. The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person.

      The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.

      No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.

      No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.5

      No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.

      No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to the Ports of one State over those of another; nor shall Vessels bound to, or from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.

      No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time.

      No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

      Section 10. No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility.

      No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the Revision and Controul of the Congress.

      No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.

      Article II

      Section 1. The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows:

      Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

      [The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the list the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them by Ballot the Vice President.]6

      The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.

      No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

      In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said Office,7 the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability, both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall then act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.

      The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be encreased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.

      Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:—“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

      Section 2. The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment.

      He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law; but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.

      The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.

      Section 3. He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them, with Respect to the Time of Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time as he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.

      Section 4. The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

      Article III

      Section 1. The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated Times, receive for their Services, a Compensation, which shall not be diminished during their Continuance in Office.

      Section 2. The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority; — to all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls; —to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction; —to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party; —to Controversies between two or more States; —between a State and Citizens of another State; —between Citizens of different States; —between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects.8

      In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.

      The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury; and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.

      Section 3. Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.

      The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted.

      Article IV

      Section 1. Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.

      Section 2. The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States.

      A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.

      [No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.]9

      Section 3. New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.

      The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State.

      Section 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened) against domestic Violence.

      Article V

      The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided [that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and]10 that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.

      Article VI

      All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation.

      This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.

      The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.

      Article VII

      The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.

      Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth. IN WITNESS whereof We have hereunto subscribed our Names,

      George Washington,

      President and deputy from Virginia.m

      [The language of the original Constitution, not including the Amendments, was adopted by a convention of the states on September 17, 1787, and was subsequently ratified by the states on the following dates: Delaware, December 7, 1787; Pennsylvania, December 12, 1787; New Jersey, December 18, 1787; Georgia, January 2, 1788; Connecticut, January 9, 1788; Massachusetts, February 6, 1788; Maryland, April 28, 1788; South Carolina, May 23, 1788; New Hampshire, June 21, 1788.

      Ratification was completed on June 21, 1788.

      The Constitution subsequently was ratified by Virginia, June 25, 1788; New York, July 26, 1788; North Carolina, November 21, 1789; Rhode Island, May 29, 1790; and Vermont, January 10, 1791.]

      Amendments

      Amendment I

      (First ten amendments ratified December 15, 1791.)

      Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

      Amendment II

      A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

      Amendment III

      No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

      Amendment IV

      The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

      Amendment V

      No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

      Amendment VI

      In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

      Amendment VII

      In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

      Amendment VIII

      Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

      Amendment IX

      The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

      Amendment X

      The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

      Amendment XI (Ratified February 7, 1795)

      The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.

      Amendment XII (Ratified June 15, 1804)

      The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate; — The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted; — The person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. [And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or other constitutional disability of the President. —]11 The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.

      Amendment XIII (Ratified December 6, 1865)

      Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

      Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Amendment XIV (Ratified July 9, 1868)

      Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

      Section 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age,12 and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

      Section 3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.

      Section 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void.

      Section 5. The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

      Amendment XV (Ratified February 3, 1870)

      Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

      Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Amendment XVI (Ratified February 3, 1913)

      The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.

      Amendment XVII (Ratified April 8, 1913)

      The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures.

      When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, That the legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct.

      This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.

      [Amendment XVIII (Ratified January 16, 1919)

      Section 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.

      Section 2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Section 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.]13

      Amendment XIX (Ratified August 18, 1920)

      The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

      Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Amendment XX (Ratified January 23, 1933)

      Section 1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin.

      Section 2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different day.

      Section 3.14 If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall have qualified.

      Section 4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them.

      Section 5. Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ratification of this article.

      Section 6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission.

      Amendment XXI (Ratified December 5, 1933)

      Section 1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed.

      Section 2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.

      Section 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

      Amendment XXII (Ratified February 27, 1951)

      Section 1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this Article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term.

      Section 2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.

      Amendment XXIII (Ratified March 29, 1961)

      Section 1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct:

      A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

      Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Amendment XXIV (Ratified January 23, 1964)

      Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.

      Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Amendment XXV (Ratified February 10, 1967)

      Section 1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.

      Section 2. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.

      Section 3. Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.

      Section 4. Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.

      Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office.

      Amendment XXVI (Ratified July 1, 1971)

      Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

      Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

      Amendment XXVII (Ratified May 7, 1992)

      No law varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.

      source: U.S. Congress, House, Committee on the Judiciary, The Constitution of the United States of America, as Amended, 100th Cong., 1st sess., 1987, H Doc 100 94.

      notes:

      • 1. The part in brackets was changed by section 2 of the Fourteenth Amendment.
      • 2. The part in brackets was changed by the first paragraph of the Seventeenth Amendment.
      • 3. The part in brackets was changed by the second paragraph of the Seventeenth Amendment.
      • 4. The part in brackets was changed by section 2 of the Twentieth Amendment.
      • 5. The Sixteenth Amendment gave Congress the power to tax incomes.
      • 6. The material in brackets was superseded by the Twelfth Amendment.
      • 7 This provision was affected by the Twenty-fifth Amendment.
      • 8. These clauses were affected by the Eleventh Amendment.
      • 9. This paragraph was superseded by the Thirteenth Amendment.
      • 10. Obsolete.
      • 11. The part in brackets was superseded by section 3 of the Twentieth Amendment.
      • 12. See the Nineteenth and Twenty-sixth Amendments.
      • 13. This amendment was repealed by section 1 of the Twenty-first Amendment.
      • 14. See the Twenty-fifth Amendment.
      Online Sources of Decisions

      By accessing the Internet, one can read the full text of Supreme Court decisions and listen to oral arguments from historic cases. The following sites are some of the best.

      U.S. Supreme Court Web Site

      The Supreme Court's Web site, launched in 2000 and substantially redesigned in 2010, provides online access to decisions and orders as released, transcripts of oral arguments within hours of completion, and up-to-date docket information on all pending cases. Audio recordings of oral arguments are posted on the site at the end of the week of the session. The site also provides a link to a site maintained by the American Bar Association that posts all merits briefs filed in cases for the current term. In addition, the Supreme Court site contains basic information about the Court and its operations: rules, argument calendars, bar admission forms, visitors’ guides, a jobs section, biographies of the current justices, and historical materials.

      SCOTUSblog

      SCOTUSblog, a private service founded by attorney Thomas Goldstein in 2002 and sponsored since October 2011 by Bloomberg Law, provides comprehensive news coverage of and information about current Supreme Court cases. (The name derives from the journalistic abbreviation for “Supreme Court of the United States.”) For the current term, the site provides for each case granted review access to the decision of the lower court, the petition for certiorari and all subsequent filings, the argument transcript, and the eventual decision. SCOTUSblog staff and outside contributors provide timely coverage of decisions, arguments, and other developments. The site also includes a statistics section with such information as voting relationships among the justices, an educational resources section with biographies of the justices, and a Supreme Court glossary. Users can connect with the blog at such social media sites as Facebook and Twitter.

      CQ Press Supreme Court Collection

      This database provides summaries and analyses of the Court's decisions, as well as a history of the Court and biographies of the justices. The site explains the workings of the Supreme Court and its place in society. Case decisions may be searched by topic, justice, and voting bloc.

      FindLaw

      FindLaw is a comprehensive law-related site established in 1995 and acquired by Thomson West (now Thomson Reuters) in 2001. The site provides the full text of all Supreme Court decisions from 1893 to the present. The database can be browsed by year and U.S. Reports volume number or by citation, case title, or key words. The decisions are in HTML format; many have hyperlinks to citations from previous decisions. The site also maintains an archive of brief summaries of Supreme Court decisions from September 2000 to the present. FindLaw is available on such social networking sites as Facebook and Twitter.

      Legal Information Institute

      www.law.cornell.edu/supct

      Legal Information Institute, a collaborative project housed at Cornell Law School, provides current information on the Supreme Court as well as the full text of all Supreme Court decisions from May 1990 to the present. Decisions are posted on the day of release and can be accessed by name of party, key word, decision date, or other variables. The LII Bulletin, available online by free subscription, previews Supreme Court cases in advance of argument. The site also provides nearly 600 historic Supreme Court decisions dating from the Court's early years. Cases can be accessed by topic, party name, or opinion author. The site has the full text of the Supreme Court Rules, the court calendar for the current term, the schedule of oral arguments, biographical data about current and former justices, and a glossary of legal terms. The site is connected to a few social network sites, such as Twitter, Facebook, and several law-related blogs.

      Oyez

      Oyez is a multimedia archive devoted to the U.S. Supreme Court and maintained by the Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law. The site dates from a pre-Web project conceived in the late 1980s with the aim of providing access to audiotapes of all Supreme Court arguments from October 1955—when recording of arguments began. The site provides transcripts and recordings of oral arguments in current cases as they become available; RealAudio software is required. The site currently offers recordings of oral arguments from more than 1,000 Supreme Court cases. The site aims to complete the collection thanks to a major grant for hardware from the National Science Foundation and support by Google, the Internet search company. The database can be searched by title, citation, subject, and date. For each case, the site provides recordings of oral arguments and text listing the facts of the case, the constitutional question involved, and the Court's conclusion. Oyez also provides brief biographies of all current and former justices and a virtual tour of the Supreme Court building.

      Appendix

      Selected Bibliography

      Major References

      Cushman, Clare, ed. The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789–2012, 3rd ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press/SAGE, 2012.

      Epstein, Lee, Jeffrey A. Segal, Harold J. Spaeth, and Thomas G. Walker. The Supreme Court Compendium: Data, Decisions, and Developments, 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2012.

      Farrand, Max. The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, 4 vols., rev. ed. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1966.

      Finkelman, Paul, and Melvin I. Urofsky. Landmark Decisions of the United States Supreme Court, 2nd ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2007.

      Freund, Paul A., and Stanley N. Katz, gen. eds. History of the Supreme Court of the United States. Vol. 1, Antecedents and Beginnings to 1801, by Julius Goebel Jr., 1971; Vol. 2, Foundations of Power: John Marshall, 1801–1815, by George L. Haskins and Herbert A. Johnson, 1981; Vols. 3 and 4, The Marshall Court and Cultural Change, 1815–1835, by G. Edward White, 1988; Vol. 5, The Taney Period, 1836–1864, by Carl B. Swisher, 1974; Vol. 6, Reconstruction and Reunion, 1864–1888, Part One, by Charles Fairman; Vol. 7, Reconstruction and Reaction, 1864–1888, Part Two, by Charles Fairman, 1987; Vol. 8, Troubled Beginnings of the Modern State, 1888–1910, by Owen M. Fiss, 1993; Vol. 9, The Judiciary and Responsible Government, 1910–1921, by Alexander M. Bickel and Benno C. Schmidt Jr., 1984. New York: Macmillan.

      Friedman, Leon, and Fred L. Israel, eds. Justices of the United States Supreme Court: Their Lives and Major Opinions, rev. ed. New York: Facts on File, 2012.

      Gressman, Eugene, Kenneth S. Geller, Stephen M. Shapiro, Timothy S. Bishop, and Edward A. Hartnett. Supreme Court Practice, 9th ed. Washington, D.C.: Bureau of National Affairs, 2007.

      Hall, Kermit L., and James W. Ely Jr., eds. The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

      Hall, Kermit L., James W. Ely Jr., and Joel B. Grossman, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

      Irons, Peter H., and Howard Zinn. A People's History of the Supreme Court. New York: Viking, 1999.

      Jost, Kenneth. CQ Supreme Court Yearbook Online Edition. CQ Electronic Library. http://library.cqpress.com/scyb. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, annual updates.

      Kurland, Philip B., and Gerhard Casper. Landmark Briefs and Arguments in the Supreme Court of the United States. Bethesda, Md.: University Publications of America, series.

      Lawson, Don. Landmark Supreme Court Cases. Berkeley Heights, N.J.: Enslow, 1987.

      Marcus, Maeva, ed. The Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985–1992.

      Martin, Fenton S., and Robert U. Goehlert. The U.S. Supreme Court: A Bibliography. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1990.

      Mauro, Tony. Illustrated Great Decisions of the Supreme Court, 2nd ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2006.

      Savage, David G. Guide to the U.S. Supreme Court, 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010.

      Schwartz, Bernard. A Basic History of the U.S. Supreme Court. Malabar, Fla.: Krieger, 1979.

      ———. A History of the Supreme Court. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

      Stephenson, D. Grier. The Supreme Court and the American Republic: An Annotated Bibliography. New York: Garland, 1981.

      Warren, Charles. The Supreme Court in United States History, 2 vols., rev. ed. Boston: Little, Brown, 1926.

      Urofsky, Melvin I., ed. 100 Americans Making Constitutional History. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2004.

      ———, ed. Biographical Encyclopedia of the Supreme Court: The Lives and Legal Philosophies of the Justices. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2006.

      ———, ed. The Public Debate over Controversial Supreme Court Decisions. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2006.

      Supreme Court and Justices

      Abraham, Henry J. Justices, Presidents, and Senators: A History of the U.S. Supreme Court Appointments from Washington to Bush II, 5th ed. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2007.

      ———. Justices, Presidents, and Senators: A History of U.S. Supreme Court Appointments from Washington to Clinton, rev. ed. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999.

      Agresto, John. The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1984.

      Alschuler, Albert W. Law without Values: The Life, Work, and Legacy of Justice Holmes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

      Atkinson, David N. Leaving the Bench: Supreme Court Justices at the End. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1999.

      Bailey, Mark Warren. Guardians of the Moral Order: The Legal Philosophy of the Supreme Court, 1860–1910. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2004.

      Baker, Leonard. Back to Back: The Duel betweenF. D. R. and the Supreme Court. New York: Macmillan, 1967.

      ———. John Marshall: A Life in Law. New York: Macmillan, 1974.

      Baker, Liva. Felix Frankfurter. New York: Coward-McCann, 1969.

      ———. The Justice from Beacon Hill: The Life and Times of Oliver Wendell Holmes. New York: Harper Collins, 1991.

      Ball, Howard. A Defiant Life: Thurgood Marshall and the Persistence of Racism in America. New York: Crown Publishers, 1998.

      Barth, Alan. Prophets with Honor: Great Dissents and Great Dissenters in the Supreme Court. New York: Knopf, 1974.

      Baum, Lawrence. The Supreme Court, 10th ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2008.

      Belknap, Michael R. The Supreme Court under Earl Warren, 1953–1969. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2005.

      ———. The Vinson Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO, 2004.

      Belsky, Martin H., ed. The Rehnquist Court: A Retrospective. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

      Berry, Mary Frances. Stability, Security, and Continuity: Mr. Justice Burton and Decision-Making in the Supreme Court. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1978.

      Beth, Loren P. John Marshall Harlan: The Last Whig Justice. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.

      Beveridge, Albert J. The Life of John Marshall, 4 vols. Cambridge, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, The Riverside Press, 1919.

      Bickel, Alexander M. The Least Dangerous Branch: The Supreme Court at the Bar of Politics. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1962.

      ———. The Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978.

      Biskupic, Joan. American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010.

      ———. Sandra Day O'Connor: How the First Woman on the Supreme Court Became Its Most Influential Justice. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.

      Bland, Randall Walton. Private Pressure on Public Law: The Legal Career of Justice Thurgood Marshall, 1934–1991. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1993.

      Blandford, Linda A., and Patricia R. Evans, eds. Supreme Court of the United States, 1789–1980: An Index to Opinions Arranged by Justice. Millwood, N.Y.: Kraus International Publications, 1983.

      Blasi, Vincent, ed. The Burger Court: The Counter-Revolution That Wasn't. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1983.

      Blaustein, Albert P. The First One Hundred Justices: Statistical Studies on the Supreme Court of the United States. Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1978.

      Bloch, Susan, and Thomas G. Krattenmaker. Supreme Court Politics: The Institution and Its Procedures. St. Paul: West, 1994.

      Blue, Frederick J. Salmon P. Chase: A Life in Politics. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1987.

      Bond, James Edward. I Dissent: The Legacy of Justice James Clark McReynolds. Fairfax, Va.: George Mason University Press, 1992.

      Bradley, Craig, ed. The Rehnquist Legacy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

      Brenner, Saul, and Harold J. Spaeth. Stare Indecisis: The Alteration of Precedent on the Supreme Court, 1946–1992. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

      Breyer, Stephen. Active Liberty: Interpreting Our Democratic Constitution. New York: Knopf, 2005.

      Brisbin, Richard A., Jr. Justice Antonin Scalia and the Conservative Revival. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.

      Brodhead, Michael J. David J. Brewer: The Life of a Supreme Court Justice, 1837–1910. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1994.

      Bronner, Ethan. Battle for Justice: How the Bork Nomination Shook America. New York: Norton, 1989.

      Brown, Francis Joseph. The Social and Economic Philosophy of Pierce Butler. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University Press, 1945.

      Byrnes, James F. All in One Lifetime. New York: Harper, 1958.

      Cannon, Mark W., and David M. O'Brien, eds. Views from the Bench: The Judiciary and Constitutional Politics. Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House, 1985.

      Caplan, Lincoln. The Tenth Justice: The Solicitor General and the Rule of Law. New York: Knopf, 1987.

      Casper, Gerhard, and Richard A. Posner. The Workload of the Supreme Court. Chicago: American Bar Foundation, 1976.

      Choper, Jesse H., ed. The Supreme Court and Its Justices, 2nd ed. Chicago: American Bar Association, 2001.

      Colucci, Frank J. Justice Kennedy's Jurisprudence: The Full and Necessary Meaning of Liberty. Lawrence, Kan.: University Press of Kansas, 2009.

      Comiskey, Michael. Seeking Justices: The Judging of Supreme Court Nominees. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.

      Cooper, Philip J. Battles on the Bench: Conflict inside the Supreme Court. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995.

      Cox, Archibald. The Court and the Constitution. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987.

      ———. The Role of the Supreme Court in American Government. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976.

      Danelski, David J. A Supreme Court Justice Is Appointed. New York: Random House, 1964.

      Davis, Michael D., and Hunter R. Clark. Thurgood Marshall: Warrior at the Bar, Rebel on the Bench. New York: Carol Publishing, 1992.

      Davis, Richard. Electing Justice: Fixing the Supreme Court Nomination Process. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

      ———. Justices and Journalists: The U.S. Supreme Court and the Media. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011.

      Davis, Sue. Justice Rehnquist and the Constitution. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1989.

      Dean, John W. The Rehnquist Choice: The Untold Story of the Nixon Appointment That Redefined the Supreme Court. New York: Free Press, 2001.

      Devins, Neal, and Davison M. Douglas, eds. A Year at the Supreme Court. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2004.

      Dewey, Donald O. Marshall versus Jefferson: The Political Background of Marbury v. Madison. New York: Knopf, 1970.

      Douglas, William Orville. The Court Years, 1939–1975: The Autobiography of William O. Douglas. New York: Random House, 1980.

      ———. Go East, Young Man: The Early Years: The Autobiography of William O. Douglas. New York: Random House, 1974.

      Dunham, Allison, ed. Mr. Justice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964.

      Dunne, Gerald T. Hugo Black and the Judicial Revolution. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1976.

      ———. Justice Joseph Story and the Rise of the Supreme Court. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1971.

      Eisler, Kim Isaac. Justice for All: William J. Brennan, Jr., and the Decisions That Transformed America. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

      Epstein, Lee, and Jack Knight. The Choices Justices Make. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 1998.

      Erickson, Rosemary J., and Rita J. Simon. The Use of Social Science Data in Supreme Court Decisions. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1998.

      Estreicher, Samuel, and John Sexton. Redefining the Supreme Court's Role. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986.

      Fairman, Charles. Mr. Justice Miller and the Supreme Court, 1862–1890. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1938.

      Fallon, Richard H., Jr. Implementing the Constitution. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001.

      Frank, John P. Marble Palace: The Supreme Court in American Life. New York: Knopf, 1958.

      Frankfurter, Felix, and James M. Landis. The Business of the Supreme Court: A Study in the Federal Judicial System. New York: Macmillan, 1928.

      Freund, Paul A. On Understanding the Supreme Court. Boston: Little, Brown, 1949.

      Fried, Charles. Saying What the Law Is: The Constitution in the Supreme Court. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2004.

      Friedelbaum, Stanley H. The Rehnquist Court: In Pursuit of Judicial Conservatism. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994.

      Friedman, Leon. Justices of the United States Supreme Court. New York: Facts on File, 2012.

      Friedman, Stephen J., ed. An Affair with Freedom: Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. New York: Atheneum, 1967.

      Gal, Allon. Brandeis of Boston. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1980.

      Garraty, John A. Quarrels That Have Shaped the Constitution, rev. ed. New York: Harper and Row, 1987.

      Gerber, Scott Douglas. First Principles: The Jurisprudence of Clarence Thomas. New York: New York University Press, 1999.

      ———, ed. Seriatim: The Supreme Court before John Marshall. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

      Gerhart, Eugene C. America's Advocate: Robert H. Jackson. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1958.

      Goldman, Roger L., with David Gallen. Justice William J. Brennan Jr.: Freedom for All. New York: Carroll and Graf, 1994.

      Gottlieb, Stephen E. Morality Imposed: The Rehnquist Court and Liberty in America. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

      Graber, Mark A., and Michael Perhac, eds. Marbury versus Madison: Documents and Commentary. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002.

      Greenhouse, Linda. Becoming Justice Blackmun: Harry Blackmun's Supreme Court Journey. New York: Times Books, 2005.

      Gugin, Linda C., and James E. St. Clair. Sherman Minton: New Deal Senator, Cold War Justice. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society, 1997.

      Halpern, S. C., and C. M. Lamb, eds. Supreme Court Activism and Restraint. Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, 1982.

      Hansford, Thomas G., and James F. Spriggs II. The Politics of Precedent on the U.S. Supreme Court. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2006.

      Harper, Fowler. Justice Rutledge and the Bright Constellation. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1965.

      Harrell, Mary Anne, and Burnett Anderson. Equal Justice under Law: The Supreme Court in American Life. Washington, D.C.: Supreme Court Historical Society, with National Geographic, 1982.

      Haw, James A., et al. Stormy Patriot: The Life of Samuel Chase. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1980.

      Highsaw, Robert Baker. Edward Douglass White: Defender of the Conservative Faith. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981.

      Hobson, Charles F. The Great Chief Justice: John Marshall and the Rule of Law. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1996.

      Hoekstra, Valerie J. Public Reaction to Supreme Court Decisions. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

      Holmes, Oliver Wendell. Collected Legal Papers. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1920.

      Howard, J. Woodford, Jr. Mr. Justice Murphy: A Political Biography. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1968.

      Hughes, Charles Evans. The Supreme Court of the United States: Its Foundations, Methods, and Achievements: An Interpretation. New York: Columbia University Press, 1928.

      Hutchinson, Dennis J. The Man Who Once Was Whizzer White: A Portrait of Justice Byron R. White. New York: Free Press, 1998.

      Irons, Peter H. Brennan vs. Rehnquist: The Battle for the Constitution. New York: Knopf, 1994.

      Irons, Peter H., and Stephanie Guitton, eds. May It Please the Court: The Most Significant Oral Arguments Made before the Supreme Court since 1955. New York: New Press. Distributed by W. W. Norton, 1997.

      Jackson, Robert H. The Struggle for Judicial Supremacy: A Study of Crisis in American Power Politics. New York: Random House, 1941.

      Jacobs, Roger F., comp. Memorials of the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. Littleton, Colo.: F. B. Rothman, 1981.

      Jeffries, John C., Jr. Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr.: A Biography. New York: Scribner's, 1994.

      Johnson, Herbert Alan. John Jay, Colonial Lawyer. New York: Garland, 1989.

      Johnson, Timothy R. Oral Arguments and Decision Making on the United States Supreme Court. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2004.

      Kahn, Ronald, and Ken I. Kersch, eds. The Supreme Court and American Political Development. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006.

      Kalman, Laura. Abe Fortas: A Biography. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990.

      Katzmann, Robert A. Judges and Legislators: Toward Institutional Comity. Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1988.

      Kaufman, Andrew L. Cardozo. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1998.

      Keck, Thomas M. The Most Activist Supreme Court in History: The Road to Modern Judicial Conservatism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

      King, Willard L. Lincoln's Manager, David Davis. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1960.

      ———. Melville Weston Fuller: Chief Justice of the United States, 1888–1910. New York: Macmillan, 1950.

      Knowles, Helen J. The Tie Goes to Freedom: Justice Anthony M. Kennedy on Liberty. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2009.

      Kurland, Philip B. Politics, the Constitution, and the Warren Court. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1970.

      Lamb, Charles M., and Stephen C. Halpern, eds. The Burger Court: Political and Judicial Profiles. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1991.

      Lasky, Victor. Arthur J. Goldberg, the Old and the New. New Rochelle, N.Y.: Arlington House, 1970.

      Lasser, William. The Limits of Judicial Power: The Supreme Court in American Politics. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988.

      Lawrence, Susan E. Law and Politics in the Supreme Court: Cases and Readings. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall Hunt Publishing, 2008.

      Lazarus, Edward. Closed Chambers: The Justices, Clerks, and Political Agendas That Run the Supreme Court. New York: Times Books, 1998.

      Leahy, James E. Freedom Fighters of the United States Supreme Court: Nine Who Championed Individual Liberty. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1996.

      ———. Supreme Court Justices Who Voted with the Government: Nine Who Favored the State over Individual Rights. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 1999.

      Leonard, Charles. A Search for Judicial Philosophy: Mr. Justice Roberts and the Constitutional Revolution of 1937. Port Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat Press, 1971.

      Lerner, Max. The Mind and Faith of Justice Holmes. Boston: Little, Brown, 1943.

      Leuchtenberg, William E. The Supreme Court Reborn: Constitutional Revolution in the Age of Roosevelt. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

      Lewis, Walker. Without Fear or Favor: A Biography of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965.

      Louthan, William C. The United States Supreme Court: Lawmaking in the Third Branch of Government. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1991.

      Lurie, Jonathan. The Chase Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO, 2004.

      McCloskey, Robert G., and Sanford Levinson. The Modern Supreme Court, 4th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

      McGuigan, Patrick B., and Dawn Weyrich. Ninth Justice: The Fight for Bork. Washington, D.C.: Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, 1990.

      Magee, James J. Mr. Justice Black: Absolutist on the Court. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1979.

      Magrath, C. Peter. Morrison R. Waite: The Triumph of Character. New York: Macmillan, 1963.

      Maltese, John Anthony. The Selling of the Supreme Court Nominees. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.

      Maltz, Earl M. The Chief Justiceship of Warren Burger, 1969–1986. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2000.

      Mason, Alpheus Thomas. Brandeis: A Free Man's Life. New York: Viking, 1946.

      ———. Harlan Fiske Stone: Pillar of the Law. New York: Viking, 1956.

      ———. The Supreme Court from Taft to Burger. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979.

      ———. William Howard Taft: Chief Justice. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1965.

      Maveety, Nancy. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor: Strategist on the Supreme Court. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1996.

      Mayer, Jane, and Jill Abramson. Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.

      Miller, Richard Lawrence. Whittaker: Struggles of a Supreme Court Justice. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2002.

      Morgan, Donald G. Justice William Johnson: The First Dissenter. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1954.

      Morris, Richard B. John Jay, the Nation, and the Court. Boston: Boston University Press, 1967.

      Murphy, Bruce Allen. The Brandeis/Frankfurter Connection: The Secret Political Activities of Two Supreme Court Justices. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

      ———. Fortas: The Rise and Ruin of a Supreme Court Justice. New York: Morrow, 1988.

      Murphy, Paul L. The Constitution in Crisis Times, 1918–1969. New York: Harper and Row, 1972.

      Newman, Roger K. Hugo Black: A Biography, 2nd rev. ed. New York: Pantheon, 1997.

      Newmyer, R. Kent. John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001.

      ———. Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story: Statesman of the Old Republic. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985.

      Novick, Sheldon M. Honorable Justice: The Life of Oliver Wendell Holmes. Boston: Little, Brown, 1989.

      O'Brien, David M. Storm Center: The Supreme Court in American Politics, 9th ed. New York: W. W. Norton, 2011.

      O'Connor, Sandra Day, and H. Alan Day. Lazy B: Growing Up on a Cattle Ranch in the American Southwest. New York: Random House, 2002.

      Pacelle, Richard L., Jr. The Transformation of the Supreme Court's Agenda: From the New Deal to the Reagan Administration. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1991.

      Paschal, Joel Francis. Mr. Justice Sutherland: A Man Against the State. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1951.

      Peppers, Todd C. Courtiers of the Marble Palace: The Rise and Influence of the Supreme Court Law Clerk. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2006.

      Perry, Barbara A. The Priestly Tribe: The Supreme Court's Image in the American Mind. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1999.

      Pfeffer, Leo. This Honorable Court: A History of the United States Supreme Court. Boston: Beacon Press, 1965.

      Pollak, Louis H., ed. The Constitution and the Supreme Court: A Documentary History, 2 vols. New York: World Publishing, 1966.

      Posner, Richard A. Cardozo: A Study in Reputation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990.

      Pringle, Henry F. Life and Times of William Howard Taft. New York: Farrar and Rinehart, 1939.

      Pritchett, C. Herman. Civil Liberties and the Vinson Court. Chicago: Viking, 1954.

      ———. The Roosevelt Court: A Study in Judicial Politics and Values, 1937–1947. New York: Macmillan, 1948.

      Provine, Doris Marie. Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980.

      Pusey, Merlo F. Charles Evans Hughes, 2 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1951.

      Rehnquist, William H. Grand Inquests: The Historic Impeachments of Justice Samuel Chase and President Andrew Johnson. New York: Morrow, 1992.

      ———. The Supreme Court: How It Was, How It Is, new ed. New York: Knopf, 2001.

      Rodell, Fred. Nine Men: A Political History of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1790–1955. New York: Random House, 1955.

      Rossum, Ralph A. Antonin Scalia's Jurisprudence: Text and Tradition. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006.

      Rowan, Carl T. Dream Makers, Dream Breakers: The World of Justice Thurgood Marshall. Boston, Little Brown, 1993.

      Rudko, Frances H. Truman's Court: A Study in Judicial Restraint. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1988.

      Savage, David G. Turning Right: The Making of the Rehnquist Supreme Court. New York: Wiley, 1992.

      Schnayerson, Robert. The Illustrated History of the Supreme Court of the United States. New York: Harry N. Abrams, with the Supreme Court Historical Society, 1986.

      Schwartz, Bernard. Inside the Warren Court, 1953–1969. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1983.

      ———. Super Chief: Earl Warren and His Supreme Court. New York: New York University Press, 1983.

      Schwartz, Herman. Packing the Courts: The Conservative Campaign to Rewrite the Constitution. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1988.

      ———, ed. The Rehnquist Court: Judicial Activism on the Right. New York: Hill and Wang, 2003.

      Shogan, Robert. A Question of Judgment: The Fortas Case and the Struggle for the Supreme Court. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1972.

      Sickels, Robert J. John Paul Stevens and the Constitution: The Search for Balance. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1988.

      Silver, David M. Lincoln's Supreme Court. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1957.

      Simon, James F. The Antagonists: Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter, and Civil Liberties in Modern America. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.

      ———. The Center Holds: The Power Struggle inside the Rehnquist Court. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1995.

      ———. Independent Journey: The Life of William O. Douglas. New York: Harper and Row, 1980.

      Smith, Christopher E. Justice Antonin Scalia and the Supreme Court's Conservative Movement. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1993.

      Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt, 1996.

      St. Clair, James E., and Linda C. Gugin. Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson of Kentucky: A Political Biography. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2002.

      Steamer, Robert J. The Supreme Court in Crisis: A History of Conflict. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1971.

      Stephenson, Donald Grier, Jr. The Waite Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO, 2003.

      Stevens, John Paul. Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir. New York: Little, Brown, 2011.

      Stites, Francis N. John Marshall: Defender of the Constitution. Boston: Little, Brown, 1981.

      Strum, Philippa. Louis D. Brandeis: A Justice for the People. New York: Schocken Books, 1989.

      Sunstein, Cass R. Playing It Safe: How the Supreme Court Sidesteps Hard Cases and Stunts the Development of Law. New York: New York University Press, 2001.

      Supreme Court. Rules of the Supreme Court of the United States, rev. ed. Washington, D.C.: Clerk, U.S. Supreme Court, 1980.

      Swindler, William F. Court and Constitution in the Twentieth Century: The New Legality, 1932–1968. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1970.

      ———. Court and Constitution in the Twentieth Century: The Old Legality, 1889–1932. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1969.

      Swisher, Carl Brent. Roger B. Taney. New York: Macmillan, 1935.

      ———. Stephen J. Field: Craftsman of the Law. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1930.

      Tomlins, Christopher, ed. The United States Supreme Court: The Pursuit of Justice. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2005.

      Toobin, Jeffrey. The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court. Reprint edition. New York: Anchor Books, 2008.

      Tribe, Laurence H. God Save This Honorable Court: How the Choice of Justices Shapes Our History. New York: Random House, 1985.

      Trimble, Bruce R. Chief Justice Waite: Defender of the Public Interest. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1938.

      Tushnet, Mark V. A Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court and the Future of Constitutional Law. New York: Norton, 2005.

      ———. Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1936–1961. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

      Urofsky, Melvin I. Felix Frankfurter: Judicial Restraint and Individual Liberties. Boston: Twayne, 1991.

      Van Sickel, Robert W. Not a Particularly Different Voice: The Jurisprudence of Sandra Day O'Connor. New York: Peter Lang, 1998.

      Walker, Thomas G., and Lee Epstein. The Supreme Court of the United States: An Introduction. New York: St. Martin's, 1993.

      Ward, Artemus. Deciding to Leave: The Politics of Retirement from the United States Supreme Court. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003.

      Ward, Artemus, and David L. Weiden. Sorcerers’ Apprentices: 100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court. New York: New York University Press, 2006.

      Warner, Hoyt Landon. The Life of Mr. Justice Clarke: A Testament to the Power of Liberal Dissent in America. Cleveland: Case Western Reserve University Press, 1959.

      Wasby, Stephen L. The Supreme Court in the Federal Judicial System, 3rd ed. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1988.

      Westin, Alan F., ed. An Autobiography of the Supreme Court: Off-the-Bench Commentary by the Justices. New York: Macmillan, 1963.

      ———. The Supreme Court: Views from Inside. New York: Norton, 1961.

      Whichard, Willis P. Justice James Iredell. Durham, N.C.: Carolina Academic Press, 2000.

      White, G. Edward. Earl Warren: A Public Life. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

      Wilkinson, J. Harvie, III. Serving Justice: A Supreme Court Clerk's View. New York: Charterhouse, 1974.

      Witt, Elder. Different Justice: Reagan and the Supreme Court. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1986.

      Woodward, Bob, and Scott Armstrong. The Brethren: Inside the Supreme Court. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1979.

      Yarbrough, Tinsley E. David Hackett Souter: Traditional Republican on the Rehnquist Court. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

      ———. John Marshall Harlan: Great Dissenter of the Warren Court. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

      ———. Mr. Justice Black and His Critics. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1988.

      Yalof, David Alistair. Pursuit of Justice: Presidential Politics and the Selection of Supreme Court Nominees. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

      Young, Evan A. Lone Star Justice: A Biography of Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark. Dallas: Hendrick-Long, 1997.

      Judicial System

      Abraham, Henry J. The Judicial Process, 7th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

      Bator, Paul M., Daniel J. Meltzer, Paul J. Mishkin, and David L. Shapiro. Hart & Wechsler's The Federal Courts and the Federal System, 3rd ed. Westbury, N.Y.: Foundation Press, 1988.

      Baum, Lawrence. American Courts: Process and Policy, 7th ed. Florence, Ky.: Cengage, 2012.

      ———. Judges and Their Audiences: A Perspective on Judicial Behavior. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2006.

      Berger, Raoul. Death Penalties: The Supreme Court's Obstacle Course. Bloomington, Ind.: IUniverse, 1999.

      ———. Government by Judiciary: The Transformation of the Fourteenth Amendment. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1977.

      Cardozo, Benjamin. The Nature of the Judicial Process. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1921.

      Carp, Robert A., Ronald Stidham, Kenneth L. Manning. Judicial Process in America, 8th ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010.

      Chase, Harold W. Federal Judges: The Appointing Process. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1972.

      Choper, Jesse H. Judicial Review and the National Political Process. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980.

      Corwin, Edward S. The Constitution and What It Means Today, 14th ed. Revised by Harold W. Chase and Craig R. Ducat. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1978.

      Ellis, Richard E. The Jeffersonian Crisis: Courts and Politics in the Young Republic. New York: Oxford University Press, 1971.

      Ely, John Hart. Democracy and Distrust: A Theory of Judicial Review. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1980.

      Epstein, Lee. Conservatives in Court. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1985.

      Frank, Jerome. Courts on Trial: Myth and Reality in American Justice. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1973.

      Friedman, Lawrence M. A History of American Law, 3rd ed. New York: Touchstone, 2005.

      ———. Law in America: A Short History. New York: The Modern Library, 2004.

      Glick, Henry R. Courts in American Politics. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990.

      Goldman, Sheldon. Picking Federal Judges: Lower Court Selection from Roosevelt through Reagan. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997.

      Goldman, Sheldon, and Thomas Jahnige. The Federal Courts as a Political System. New York: Harper and Row, 1976.

      Hall, Kermit L. The Magic Mirror: Law in American History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

      Holmes, Oliver Wendell. The Common Law. Boston: Little, Brown, 1881.

      Jacobstein, J. Myron, and Roy M. Mersky, eds. Fundamentals of Legal Research, 7th ed. Mineola, N.Y.: Foundation Press, 1998.

      Jonakait, Randolph N. The American Jury System. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2003.

      Kramer, Larry D. The People Themselves: Popular Constitutionalism and Judicial Review. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

      Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. The Founders’ Constitution, 5 vols. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.

      Levy, Leonard W. Constitutional Opinions. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

      ———. Original Intent and the Framers’ Constitution. New York: Macmillan, 1988.

      Lieberman, Jethro K. The Litigious Society. New York: Basic Books, 1981.

      Murphy, Walter F. Elements of Judicial Strategy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964.

      Murphy, Walter F., and C. Herman Pritchett, eds. Courts, Judges, and Politics. New York: Random House, 1986.

      Olson, Walter K. The Litigation Explosion: What Happened When America Unleashed the Lawsuit. New York: Plume, 1991.

      O'Neill, Jonathan. Originalism in American Law and Politics: A Constitutional History. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005.

      Rubenfeld, Jed. Revolution by Judiciary: The Structure of American Constitutional Law. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2005.

      Schmidhauser, John R. Judges and Justices: The Federal Appellate Judiciary. Boston: Little, Brown, 1979.

      Shugerman, Jed Handelsman. The People's Courts: Pursuing Judicial Independence in America. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2012.

      Stuntz, William J. The Collapse of American Criminal Justice. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011.

      Ward, Kenneth D., and Cecilia R. Catillo, eds. The Judiciary and American Democracy: Alexander Bickel, the Countermajoritarian Difficulty, and Contemporary Constitutional Theory. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2005.

      White, G. Edward. The Constitution and the New Deal. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.

      Wolfe, Christopher. The Rise of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation to Judge-Made Law. New York: Basic Books, 1986.

      Business and Regulation

      Ackerman, Bruce A. Private Property and the Constitution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977.

      Baxter, Maurice G. The Steamboat Monopoly: Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824. New York: Knopf, Borzoi Books, 1972.

      Benson, Paul R., Jr. The Supreme Court and the Commerce Clause, 1937–1970. New York: Dunellen, 1970.

      Bork, Robert H. The Antitrust Paradox: A Policy at War with Itself. New York: Basic Books, 1978.

      Cortner, Richard C. The Iron Horse and the Constitution: Railroads and the Transformation of the Fourteenth Amendment. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1993.

      ———. The Jones & Laughlin Case. New York: Knopf, Borzoi Books, 1970.

      Corwin, Edward S. The Commerce Power versus States Rights. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1959.

      Coyle, Dennis J. Property Rights and the Constitution: Shaping Society through Land Use Regulation. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993.

      Edling, Max M. A Revolution in Favor of Government: Origins of the U.S. Constitution and the Making of the American State. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

      Epstein, Richard A. Takings. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1985.

      Frankfurter, Felix. The Commerce Clause under Marshall, Taney, and Waite. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1937.

      Gellman, Howard. The Constitution Besieged: The Rise and Demise of Lochner Era Police Powers Jurisprudence. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1993.

      Kens, Paul. Lochner v. New York: Economic Regulation on Trial. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998.

      Kutler, Stanley. Privilege and Creative Destruction: The Charles River Bridge Case. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1971.

      Labbé, Ronald M., and Jonathan Lurie. The Slaughterhouse Cases: Regulation, Reconstruction, and the Fourteenth Amendment. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2003.

      Lieberman, Elias. Unions before the Bar. New York: Harper and Row, 1950.

      Mann, Richard A., and Barry S. Roberts. Business Law and the Regulation of Business, 10th ed. South-Western College/West, 2010.

      Miller, Arthur Selwyn. The Supreme Court and American Capitalism. New York: Free Press, 1968.

      Peritz, Rudolph J. R. Competition Policy in America, 1888–1992: History, Rhetoric, Law. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

      Siegan, Bernard H. Economic Liberties and the Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.

      Stites, Francis N. Private Interest and Public Gain: The Dartmouth College Case. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1972.

      Twiss, Benjamin R. Lawyers and the Constitution: How Laissez Faire Came to the Supreme Court. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1942.

      Wood, Stephen. Constitutional Politics in the Progressive Era: Child Labor and the Law. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968.

      Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

      Abraham, Henry J., and Barbara A. Perry, Freedom and the Court: Civil Rights and Liberties in the United States, 8th ed. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2003.

      Baker, Thomas E., and John F. Stack Jr., eds. At War with Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2005.

      Ball, Howard. The Bakke Case: Race, Education, and Affirmative Action. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000.

      ———. Murder in Mississippi: United States v. Price and the Struggle for Civil Rights. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.

      Bell, Derrick. Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

      Brant, Irving. The Bill of Rights: Its Origin and Meaning. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1965.

      Claude, Richard. The Supreme Court and the Electoral Process. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1970.

      Cottrol, Robert J., Raymond T. Diamond, and Leland B. Ware. Brown v. Board of Education: Caste, Culture, and the Constitution. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2003.

      Cushman, Clare, ed. Supreme Court Decisions and Women's Rights, 2nd ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010.

      Cushman, Clare, and Melvin I. Urofsky, eds. Black, White, and Brown: The Landmark School Desegregation Case in Retrospect. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2004.

      Dorsen, Norman. Discrimination and Civil Rights. Boston: Little, Brown, 1969.

      Fehrenbacher, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

      Fellman, David. The Constitutional Right of Association. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1963.

      Galloway, Russell W. Justice for All? The Rich and Poor in Supreme Court History, 1790–1990. Durham, N.C.: Carolina Academic Press, 1991.

      Garrow, David J. Liberty and Sexuality: The Right of Privacy and the Making of Roe v. Wade. New York: Macmillan, 1994.

      Gerstmann, Evan. Same-Sex Marriage and the Constitution. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

      Glendon, Mary Ann. Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse. New York: Free Press, 1991.

      Graglia, Lino A. Disaster by Decree: The Supreme Court's Decisions on Race and the Schools. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1976.

      Graham, Hugh D. The Civil Rights Era: Origins and Development of National Policy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

      Greenawalt, Kent. Discrimination and Reverse Discrimination. New York: Knopf, 1983.

      Guggenheim, Martin, and Alan Sussman. The Rights of Young People. New York: Bantam Books, 1985.

      Hand, Learned. The Bill of Rights. New York: Atheneum, 1964.

      Harris, Richard. Freedom Spent. Boston: Little, Brown, 1974.

      Harrison, Maureen, and Steve Gilbert. Civil Rights Decisions of the United States Supreme Court: The 19th Century. Carlsbad, Calif.: Excellent Books, 1994.

      Hasen, Richard L. The Supreme Court and Election Law: Judging Equality from Baker v. Carr to Bush v. Gore. New York: New York University Press, 2003.

      Hull, N. E. H., and Peter Charles Hoffer. Roe v. Wade: The Abortion Rights Controversy in American History. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2001.

      Hyman, Harold M., and William M. Weicek. Equal Justice under Law. New York: Harper and Row, 1982.

      Irons, Peter. The Courage of Their Convictions: Sixteen Americans Who Fought Their Way to the Supreme Court. New York: Free Press, 1988.

      Johnson, John W. Griswold v. Connecticut: Birth Control and the Constitutional Right to Privacy. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2005.

      Kahlenberg, Richard D. The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action. New York: Basic Books, 1996.

      Kersch, Ken I. Constructing Civil Liberties: Discontinuities in the Development of American Constitutional Law. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

      Klarman, Michael J. From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

      Kluger, Richard. Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality. New York: Knopf, 1976.

      Kull, Andrew. The Color-Blind Constitution. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1992.

      Lawrence, Charles R., III, and Mari Matsuda. We Won't Go Back: Making the Case for Affirmative Action. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.

      Luker, Kristin. Abortion and the Politics of Motherhood. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984.

      Morgan, Richard E. The Law and Politics of Civil Rights and Liberties. New York: Knopf, 1985.

      Murdoch, Joyce, and Deb Price. Courting Justice: Gay Men and Lesbians v. the Supreme Court. New York: Basic Books, 2001.

      Raskin, Jamin B. We the Students: Supreme Court Cases for and about Students, 3rd ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2008.

      Rehnquist, William H., All the Laws but One: Civil Liberties in Wartime. New York: Knopf, 1998.

      Romero, Victor C. Alienated: Immigrant Rights, the Constitution, and Equality in America. New York: New York University Press, 2005.

      Ross, Susan Deller, and Ann Barcher. The Rights of Women: The Basic ACLU Guide to Women's Rights, 3rd ed. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1993.

      Rubin, Eva, ed. The Abortion Controversy: A Documentary History. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994.

      ———. Abortion, Politics, and the Courts: Roe v. Wade and Its Aftermath. New York: Greenwood Press, 1987.

      Schwartz, Bernard. Behind Bakke: Affirmative Action and the Supreme Court. New York: New York University Press, 1988.

      Skrentny, John D. The Minority Rights Revolution. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, Belknap Press, 2002.

      Smith, Christopher E. Courts and the Poor. Chicago: Nelson-Hall, 1991.

      Spann, Girardeau A. The Law of Affirmative Action: Twenty-five Years of Supreme Court Decisions on Race and Remedies. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

      Stampp, Kenneth M. The Era of Reconstruction, 1865–1877. New York: Knopf, 1965.

      Steiner, Gilbert. The Abortion Dispute and the American System. Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1983.

      Strong, Frank R. Substantive Due Process of Law: A Dichotomy of Sense and Nonsense. Durham, N.C.: Carolina Academic Press, 1986.

      Tribe, Laurence H. Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes, rev. ed. New York: Norton, 1992.

      Tucker, D. F. B. The Rehnquist Court and Civil Rights. Brookfield, Vt.: Dartmouth, 1995.

      Tushnet, Mark V. Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956–1961. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

      Tushnet, Mark, ed. The Constitution in Wartime: Beyond Alarmism and Complacency. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2005.

      Valelly, Richard, ed. The Voting Rights Act: Securing the Ballot. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2006.

      Vose, Clement E. Caucasians Only: The Supreme Court, the NAACP, and the Restrictive Covenant Cases. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1959.

      Walker, Samuel. In Defense of American Liberties: A History of the ACLU. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.

      White, Welsh S. Miranda's Warning Protections: Police Interrogation Practices after Dickerson. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001.

      Wilkinson, J. Harvie, III. From Brown to Bakke: The Supreme Court and School Integration. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.

      Zelden, Charles L. The Battle for the Black Ballot: Smith v. Allwright and the Defeat of the Texas All-White Primary. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.

      Criminal Justice

      Ahranjani, Maryam, Andrew G. Ferguson, and Jamin B. Raskin. Youth Justice in America. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2005.

      Baker, Liva. Miranda: Crime, Law, and Politics. New York: Atheneum, 1983.

      Bedau, Hugo Adam. The Death Penalty in America, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

      ———, ed. The Death Penalty in America: Current Controversies. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

      Berger, Mark. Taking the Fifth: The Supreme Court and the Privilege against Self-Incrimination. Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, 1980.

      Carmen, Rolando del. Criminal Procedure and the Supreme Court: A Guide to the Major Decisions on Search and Seizure, Privacy, and Individual Rights. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2010.

      Cortner, Richard C. The Supreme Court and the Second Bill of Rights: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Nationalization of Civil Liberties. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1980.

      Duker, William F. A Constitutional History of Habeas Corpus. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1980.

      Fellman, David. The Defendant's Rights Today. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1976.

      Fisher, Edward C. Search and Seizure. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1970.

      Fliter, John A. Prisoners’ Rights: The Supreme Court and Evolving Standards of Decency. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2001.

      Graham, Fred P. The Due Process Revolution: The Warren Court's Impact on Criminal Law. Rochelle Park, N.J.: Hayden, 1979.

      ———. The Self-Inflicted Wound. New York: Macmillan, 1970.

      Griswold, Erwin N. Search and Seizure: A Dilemma of the Supreme Court. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1975.

      Hall, Kermit L. The Rights of the Accused: The Justices and Criminal Justice: The Supreme Court in American Society. New York: Routledge, 2000.

      Heller, Francis H. The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States: A Study in Constitutional Development. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1951.

      Landynski, Jacob W. Search and Seizure and the Supreme Court. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1966.

      Levy, Leonard. Against the Law: The Nixon Court and Criminal Justice. New York: Harper and Row, 1974.

      Lewis, Anthony. Gideon's Trumpet. New York: Vintage, 1964.

      Long, Carolyn N. Mapp v. Ohio: Guarding against Unreasonable Searches and Seizures. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006.

      McCord, David, and Barry Latzer. Death Penalty Cases: Leading U.S. Supreme Court Cases on Capital Punishment, 3rd ed. Burlington, Mass.: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2011.

      Medalie, Richard J. From Escobedo to Miranda: The Anatomy of a Supreme Court Decision. Washington, D.C.: Lerner Law Book Co., 1966.

      Meltsner, Michael. Cruel and Unusual: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment. New York: Random House, 1973.

      Schlesinger, Steven R. Exclusionary Injustice: The Problem of Illegally Obtained Evidence. New York: Marcel Dekker, 1977.

      White, Welsh S. The Death Penalty in the Eighties: An Examination of the Modern System of Capital Punishment. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1987.

      Zotti, Priscilla H. Machado. Injustice for All: Mapp v. Ohio and the Fourth Amendment. New York: Peter Lang, 2005.

      Federalism and Separation of Powers

      Ball, Howard. The Warren Court's Conceptions of Democracy: An Evaluation of the Supreme Court's Apportionment Cases. Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1971.

      Barnes, Jeb. Overruled? Legislative Overrides, Pluralism, and Contemporary Court-Congress Relations. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2004.

      Berger, Raoul. Congress v. the Supreme Court. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1969.

      ———. Executive Privilege: A Constitutional Myth. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1974.

      Bland, Russell W. The Black Robe and the Bald Eagle: The Supreme Court and the Foreign Policy of the United States. San Francisco: Austin and Winfield, 1997.

      Dershowitz, Alan M. Supreme Injustice: How the High Court Hijacked Election 2000. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

      Dixon, Robert G., Jr. Democratic Representation: Reapportionment in Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1968.

      Fisher, Louis. Constitutional Conflicts between Congress and the President. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1985.

      ———. Military Tribunals and Presidential Power: American Revolution to the War on Terrorism. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2005.

      ———. Presidential War Power, 2nd ed. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.

      Graham, Gene. One Man, One Vote: Baker v. Carr and the American Levellers. Boston: Little Brown, 1972.

      Henkin, Louis. Foreign Affairs and the Constitution. New York: Foundation Press, 1972.

      Keith, Linda Camp. The U.S. Supreme Court and the Judicial Review of Congress. New York: Peter Lang, 2008.

      Kurland, Philip B. Watergate and the Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978

      Marcus, Maeva. Truman and the Steel Seizure Case: The Limits of Presidential Power. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.

      Murphy, Walter F. Congress and the Court: A Case Study in the American Political Process. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962.

      Pickerill, J. Mitchell. Constitutional Deliberation in Congress: The Impact of Judicial Review in a Separated System. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2004.

      Polsby, Nelson W., ed. Reapportionment in the 1970s. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1971.

      Posner, Richard A. Breaking Deadlock: The 2000 Election, the Constitution, and the Courts. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2001.

      Raskin, Jamin B. Overruling Democracy: The Supreme Court vs. the American People. New York: Routledge, 2003.

      Rossiter, Clinton. The Supreme Court and the Commander in Chief, exp. ed. by Richard P. Longaker. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1976.

      Schmidhauser, John R., and Larry L. Berg. The Supreme Court and Congress: Conflict and Interaction, 1945–1968. New York: Free Press, 1972.

      ———. The Supreme Court as Final Arbiter in Federal-State Relations, 1789–1957. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1958.

      Scigliano, Robert. The Supreme Court and the Presidency. New York: Free Press, 1971.

      Sunstein, Cass R., and Richard A. Epstein, eds. The Vote: Bush, Gore, and the Supreme Court. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

      Yates, Jeff. Popular Justice: Presidential Prestige and Executive Success in the Supreme Court. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002.

      Yoo, John C. The Powers of War and Peace: The Constitution and Foreign Affairs after 9/11. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

      Freedom of Speech, Press, Religion

      Alley, Robert S. The Constitution and Religion: Leading Supreme Court Cases on Church and State. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books, 1999.

      Chafee, Zechariah, Jr. Free Speech in the United States. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1941.

      Curry, Thomas. The First Freedoms. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

      Dolbeare, Kenneth M., and Phillip E. Hammond. The School Prayer Decisions: From Court Policy to Local Practice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971.

      Emerson, Thomas I. The System of Freedom of Expression. New York: Random House, 1970.

      Epps, Garrett. To an Unknown God: Religious Freedom on Trial. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2001.

      Friendly, Fred. Minnesota Rag: The Dramatic Story of the Landmark Supreme Court Case That Gave New Meaning to Freedom of the Press. New York: Random House, 1981.

      Goldstein, Robert Justin. Flag Burning and Free Speech: The Case of Texas v. Johnson. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000.

      Kurland, Philip B. Religion and the Law: Of Church and State and the Supreme Court. Chicago: Aldine, 1962.

      Lawhorne, Clifton O. The Supreme Court and Libel. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1981.

      Levy, Leonard W. Emergence of a Free Press. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

      ———. The Establishment Clause: Religion and the First Amendment. New York: Macmillan, 1986.

      Lewis, Anthony. Make No Law: The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment. New York: Random House, 1991.

      Mathewson, Joe. The Supreme Court and the Press: The Indispensable Conflict. Evanston, Ill. Northwestern University Press, 2011.

      McGarvie, Mark Douglas. One Nation under Law: America's Early National Struggles to Separate Church and State. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2004.

      Morgan, Richard E. The Supreme Court and Religion. New York: Free Press, 1972.

      Nelson, Harold L., ed. Freedom of the Press: From Hamilton to the Warren Court. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1967.

      Peters, Shawn Francis. The Yoder Case: Religious Freedom, Education, and Parental Rights. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2003.

      Pfeffer, Leo. Religion, State, and the Burger Court. Buffalo: Prometheus, 1984.

      Rudenstine, David. The Day the Presses Stopped: A History of the Pentagon Papers Case. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996.

      Schweber, Howard. Speech, Conduct, and the First Amendment. New York: Peter Lang, 2003.

      Shapiro, Martin. Freedom of Speech: The Supreme Court and Judicial Review, Classics of Law & Society ed. New Orleans: Quid Pro Books, 2011.

      Smolla, Rodney A. Free Speech in an Open Society. New York: Knopf, 1992.

      ———. Jerry Falwell v. Larry Flynt: The First Amendment on Trial. New York: St. Martin's, 1988.

      Stone, Geoffrey R. Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime from the Sedition Act of 1798 to the War on Terrorism. New York: Norton, 2004.

      Sunstein, Cass R. Democracy and the Problem of Free Speech. New York: Free Press, 1993.

    Back to Top