Previous Chapter Chapter 26: Interest Groups, Think Tanks, and Health Care Policy (1960s–Present) Next Chapter

Susan Giaimo

In: Guide to U.S. Health and Health Care Policy

Chapter 26: Interest Groups, Think Tanks, and Health Care Policy (1960s–Present)

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Interest Groups, Think Tanks, and Health Care Policy (1960s–Present)
Interest groups, think tanks, and health care policy (1960s–present)
SusanGiaimo

In U.S. Politics, Interest Groups And Research institutes have served as important sources of policy proposals for members of Congress and the executive branch. The nation's porous political system's institutional fragmentation contains numerous “veto points” at which organized interests can modify and even block legislation they dislike. Interest groups can enter the fray during the multiple points of the legislative process. They can lobby the executive branch at federal and state levels to modify the rules governing the implementation of a law. They can challenge a law in the courts.

Time and again, interest groups have blocked the enactment of health policies. Repeated failed efforts by politicians to expand ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website