Congress and the Nation, 1977-1980, Vol. V: The 95th and 96th Congresses

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    Congress and Its Members

    Congresses and Leaders, 80th to 96th
    80th Congress 1947-1949

    House

    • Speaker: Joseph W. Martin Jr., R-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Charles A. Halleck, R-Ind.
    • Majority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.
    • Minority Leader: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Minority Whip: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.

    Senate

    • Vice President: vacant
    • President Pro Tempore: Arthur H. Vandenberg, R-Mich.
    • Majority Leader: Wallace H. White Jr., R-Maine
    • Majority Whip: Kenneth Wherry, R-Neb.
    • Minority Leader: Alben W. Barkley, D-Ky.
    • Minority Whip: Scott W. Lucas, D-Ill.
    81st Congress 1949-1951

    House

    • Speaker: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Majority Leader: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Whip: J. Percy Priest, D-Tenn.
    • Minority Leader: Joseph W. Martin Jr., R-Mass.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Alben W. Barkley, D-Ky.
    • President Pro Tempore: Kenneth McKellar, D-Tenn.
    • Majority Leader: Scott W. Lucas, D-Ill.
    • Majority Whip: Francis Myers, D-Pa.
    • Minority Leader: Kenneth Wherry, R-Neb.
    • Minority Whip: Leverett Saltonstall, R-Mass.
    82nd Congress 1951-1953

    House

    • Speaker: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Majority Leader: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Whip: J. Percy Priest, D-Tenn.
    • Minority Leader: Joseph W. Martin Jr., R-Mass.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Alben W. Barkley, D-Ky.
    • President Pro Tempore: Kenneth McKellar, D-Tenn.
    • Majority Leader: Ernest W. McFarland, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Whip: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas
    • Minority Leader: Kenneth Wherry, R-Neb. Styles Bridges, R-N.H.1
    • Minority Whip: Leverett Saltonstall, R-Mass.
    83rd Congress 1953-1955

    House

    • Speaker: Joseph W. Martin Jr., R-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Charles A. Halleck, R-Ind.
    • Majority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.
    • Minority Leader: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Minority Whip: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Richard M. Nixon, R-Calif.
    • President Pro Tempore: Styles Bridges, R-N.H.
    • Majority Leader: Robert A. Taft, R-Ohio William F. Knowland, R-Calif.1
    • Majority Whip: Leverett Saltonstall, R-Mass.
    • Minority Leader: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas
    • Minority Whip: Earle Clements, D-Ky.
    84th Congress 1955-1957

    House

    • Speaker: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Majority Leader: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Whip: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Minority Leader: Joseph W. Martin Jr., R-Mass.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Richard M. Nixon, R-Calif.
    • President Pro Tempore: Walter F. George, D-Ga.
    • Majority Leader: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas
    • Majority Whip: Earle Clements, D-Ky.
    • Minority Leader: William F. Knowland, R-Calif.
    • Minority Whip: Leverett Saltonstall, R-Mass.
    85th Congress 1957-1959

    House

    • Speaker: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Richard M. Nixon, R-Calif.
    • President Pro Tempore: Carl Hayden, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Leader: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas
    • Majority Whip: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Minority Leader: William F. Knowland, R-Calif.
    • Minority Whip: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill.

    Bridges became minority leader on Jan. 8, 1952, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Wherry on Nov. 29, 1951.

    Knowland became majority leader on Aug. 4, 1953, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Taft on July 31, 1953.

    86th Congress 1959-1961

    House

    • Speaker: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas
    • Majority Leader: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Whip: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Minority Leader: Charles A. Halleck, R-Ind.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Richard M. Nixon, R-Calif.
    • President Pro Tempore: Carl Hayden, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Leader: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas
    • Majority Whip: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Minority Leader: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill.
    • Minority Whip: Thomas H. Kuchel, R-Calif.
    87th Congress 1961-1963

    House

    • Speaker: Sam Rayburn, D-Texas John W. McCormack, D-Mass.1
    • Majority Leader: John W. McCormack, D-Mass. Carl Albert, D-Okla.1
    • Majority Whip: Carl Albert, D-Okla. Hale Boggs, D-La.1
    • Minority Leader: Charles A. Halleck, R-Ind.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas
    • President Pro Tempore: Carl Hayden, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Hubert H. Humphrey, D-Minn.
    • Minority Leader: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill.
    • Minority Whip: Thomas H. Kuchel, R-Calif.
    88th Congress 1963-1965

    House

    • Speaker: John W. McCormack, R-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Whip: Hale Boggs, D-La.
    • Minority Leader: Charles A. Halleck, R-Ind.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson, D-Texas1
    • President Pro Tempore: Carl Hayden, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Hubert H. Humphrey, D-Minn.
    • Minority Leader: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill.
    • Minority Whip: Thomas H. Kuchel, R-Calif.
    89th Congress 1965-1967

    House

    • Speaker: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Whip: Hale Boggs, D-La.
    • Minority Leader: Gerald R. Ford, R-Mich.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Hubert H. Humphrey, D-Minn.
    • President Pro Tempore: Carl Hayden, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Russell Long, D-La.
    • Minority Leader: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill.
    • Minority Whip: Thomas H. Kuchel, R-Calif.
    90th Congress 1967-1969

    House

    • Speaker: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Whip: Hale Boggs, D-La.
    • Minority Leader: Gerald R. Ford, R-Mich.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Hubert H. Humphrey, D-Minn.
    • President Pro Tempore: Carl Hayden, D-Ariz.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Russell Long, D-La.
    • Minority Leader: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill.
    • Minority Whip: Thomas H. Kuchel, R-Calif.
    91st Congress 1969-1971

    House

    • Speaker: John W. McCormack, D-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Whip: Hale Boggs, D-La.
    • Minority Leader: Gerald R. Ford, R-Mich.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Spiro T. Agnew, R-Md.
    • President Pro Tempore: Richard B. Russell, D-Ga.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.
    • Minority Leader: Everett M. Dirksen, R-Ill. Hugh Scott, R-Pa.1
    • Minority Whip: Hugh Scott, R-Pa. Robert P. Griffin, R-Mich.1

    McCormack became Speaker on Jan. 10, 1962, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Rayburn on Nov. 16, 1961.

    Albert became majority leader on Jan. 10, 1962, filling the vacancy caused by the elevation of McCormack to the post of Speaker.

    Boggs became majority whip on Jan. 10, 1962, filling the vacancy caused by the elevation of Albert to the post of majority leader.

    Johnson became president Nov. 22, 1963, following the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The vice presidency was vacant for the remainder of the term.

    Scott became majority leader on Sept. 24, 1969, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Dirksen on Sept. 7, 1969.

    Griffin became minority whip on Sept. 24, 1969, filling the vacancy caused by the elevation of Scott to the post of minority leader.

    92nd Congress 1971-1973

    House

    • Speaker: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Leader: Hale Boggs, D-La.
    • Majority Whip: Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., D-Mass.
    • Minority Leader: Gerald R. Ford, D-Mich.
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Spiro T. Agnew, R-Md.
    • President Pro Tempore: Richard B. Russell, D-Ga. Allen J. Ellender, D-La.1 James O. Eastland, D-Miss.1
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.
    • Minority Leader: Hugh Scott, R-Pa.
    • Minority Whip: Robert P. Griffin, R-Mich.
    93rd Congress 1973-1975

    House

    • Speaker: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Leader: Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., D-Mass.
    • Majority Whip: John J. McFall, D-Calif.
    • Minority Leader: Gerald R. Ford, R-Mich. John J. Rhodes, R-Ariz.1
    • Minority Whip: Leslie C. Arends, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Spiro T. Agnew, R-Md Gerald R. Ford, R-Mich.1 Nelson A. Rockefeller, R-N.Y.1
    • President Pro Tempore: James O. Eastland, D-Miss.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.
    • Minority Leader: Hugh Scott, R-Pa.
    • Minority Whip: Robert P. Griffin, R-Mich.
    94th Congress 1975-1977

    House

    • Speaker: Carl Albert, D-Okla.
    • Majority Leader: Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., D-Mass.
    • Majority Whip: John J. McFall, D-Calif.
    • Minority Leader: John J. Rhodes, R-Ariz.
    • Minority Whip: Robert H. Michel, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Nelson A. Rockefeller, R-N.Y.
    • President Pro Tempore: James O. Eastland, D-Miss.
    • Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield, D-Mont.
    • Majority Whip: Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.
    • Minority Leader: Hugh Scott, R-Pa.
    • Minority Whip: Robert P. Griffin, R-Mich.
    95th Congress 1977-1979

    House

    • Speaker: Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., D-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Jim Wright, D-Texas
    • Majority Whip: John Brademas, D-Ind.
    • Minority Leader: John J. Rhodes, R-Ariz.
    • Minority Whip: Robert H. Michel, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Walter F. Mondale, D-Minn.
    • President Pro Tempore: James O. Eastland, D-Miss.
    • Majority Leader: Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.
    • Majority Whip: Alan Cranston, D-Calif.
    • Minority Leader: Howard H. Baker Jr., R-Tenn.
    • Minority Whip: Ted Stevens, R-Alaska
    96th Congress 1979-1981

    House

    • Speaker: Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., D-Mass.
    • Majority Leader: Jim Wright, D-Texas
    • Majority Whip: John Brademas, D-Ind.
    • Minority Leader: John J. Rhodes, R-Ariz.
    • Minority Whip: Robert H. Michel, R-Ill.

    Senate

    • Vice President: Walter F. Mondale, D-Minn.
    • President Pro Tempore: Warren G. Magnuson, D-Wash.
    • Majority Leader: Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.
    • Majority Whip: Alan Cranston, D-Calif.
    • Minority Leader: Howard H. Baker Jr., R-Tenn.
    • Minority Whip: Ted Stevens, R-Alaska

    Ellender became president pro tempore Jan. 22, 1971, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Russell Jan. 21, 1971.

    Eastland became president pro tempore July 28, 1972, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Ellender July 27, 1972.

    Rhodes became minority leader on Dec. 7, 1973, filling the vacancy caused by the resignation of Ford on Dec. 6, 1973, to become vice president.

    Ford became vice president Dec. 6, 1973, filling the vacancy caused by the resignation of Agnew on Oct. 10, 1973.

    Rockefeller became vice president Dec. 19, 1974, filling the vacancy caused by the elevation of Ford to the presidency upon the resignation of Richard M. Nixon on Aug. 9, 1974.

    Congressional Committees, 95th and 96th Congresses

    Following is a listing of congressional committees and subcommittees in the 95th and 96th Congresses. The Senate roster reflects a major reorganization of the committee structure that took place at the beginning of the 95th Congress in 1977.(Details, p. 880)

    The organization and titles of the subcommittees are given as of the 96th Congress. In a few cases, the subcommittees were merged, newly created or their names changed between the 95th (1977-1978) and 96th (1979-1980) Congresses.

    Also listed are the names of the committee chairmen (all Democrats) and the dates of their service in that capacity. Ranking Republicans are italicized; an asterisk indicates they served in that capacity in both Congresses. An asterisk following the name of subcommittee chairmen indicates they served as chairmen during all four years.

    (The names and dates of terms of chairmen of standing committees between 1947 and 1965 may be found inCongress and the Nation Vol. I, pp. 32a-35a; between 1947 and 1969, inCongress and the Nation Vol. II, pp. 46a-50a; between 1947 and 1973, inCongress and the Nation Vol. III, pp. 52a-56aand between 1947 and 1977 inCongress and the Nation Vol. IV, pp. 1068-72.)

    Senate Committees

    Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry

    Agriculture in general, including farm credit and security; crop insurance, soil conservation and rural electrification; forestry in general; human nutrition (the committee assumed the jurisdiction of the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, which was abolished in 1977); school nutrition programs; and matters relating to food, nutrition and hunger.

    • D 10 - R 8
    • Herman E. Talmadge, Ga. (1971-1980)
    • Robert Dole, Kan.*
    Agricultural Credit and Rural Electrification

    James B. Allen, Ala. (95th Congress); Edward Zorinsky, Neb. (96th Congress)

    Agricultural Production, Marketing and Stabilization of Prices

    Walter D. Huddleston, Ky.*

    Agricultural Research and General Legislation

    Patrick J. Leahy, Vt. (95th Congress); Donald Stewart, Ala. (96th Congress)

    Environment, Soil Conservation, and Forestry

    James O. Eastland, Miss. (95th Congress); John Melcher, Mont. (96th Congress)

    Foreign Agricultural Policy

    Hubert H. Humphrey, Minn. (95th Congress); Richard Stone, Fla. (96th Congress)

    Nutrition

    George McGovern, S.D.*

    Rural Development

    Dick Clark, Iowa (95th Congress); Patrick J. Leahy, Vt. (96th Congress)

    Appropriations

    Appropriations of government revenues.

    • D 17 - R 11
    • John L. McClellan, Ark. (1972-Nov. 1977)
    • Warren G. Magnuson, Wash. (1978-1980)
    • Milton R. Young, N.D.*
    Agriculture

    Thomas F. Eagleton, Mo.*

    Defense

    John L. McClellan (to November 1977); John C. Stennis, Miss. (1978-1980)

    District of Columbia

    Patrick J. Leahy, Vt.*

    Energy and Water Development

    John C. Stennis, Miss. (95th Congress); J. Bennett Johnston, La. (96th Congress)

    Foreign Operations

    Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaii.*

    HUD-Independent Agencies

    William Proxmire, Wis.*

    Interior

    Robert C. Byrd, W.Va.*

    Labor, Health, Education and Welfare

    Warren G. Magnuson, Wash.*

    Legislative Branch

    Walter D. Huddleston, Ky. (95th Congress); Jim Sasser, Tenn. (96th Congress)

    Military Construction

    J. Bennett Johnston (95th Congress); Walter D. Huddleston, Ky. (96th Congress)

    State, Justice, Commerce, the Judiciary

    Ernest F. Hollings, S.C.*

    Transportation

    Birch Bayh, Ind.*

    Treasury, Postal Service, General Government

    Lawton Chiles, Fla.*

    Armed Services

    Military affairs, Panama Canal and Canal Zone; strategic and critical materials; aeronautical and space activities peculiar to or primarily associated with development of weapons systems of military operations.

    • D 10 - R 7
    • John C. Stennis, Miss. (1961-1980)
    • John Tower, Texas.*
    Arms Control

    Henry M. Jackson, Wash.*

    General Procurement

    John C. Stennis, Miss. (95th Congress); Harry F. Byrd Jr., Va. (96th Congress)

    Manpower and Personnel

    Sam Nunn, Ga.*

    Military Construction and Stockpiles

    Gary Hart, Colo.*

    Procurement Policy Reprogramming

    John C. Stennis, Miss. (95th Congress); Robert Morgan, N.C. (96th Congress)

    Research and Development

    Thomas J. McIntyre, N.H. (95th Congress); John C. Culver, Iowa (96th Congress)

    Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs

    Banking and currency generally; financial matters other than taxes and appropriations; public and private housing; economic controls; urban affairs.

    • D 9 - R 6
    • William Proxmire, Wis. (1975-1980)
    • Edward W. Brooke, Mass. (95th Congress);
    • Jake Garn, Utah (96th Congress)
    Consumer Affairs

    Donald W. Riegle Jr., Mich. (95th Congress); Paul E. Tsongas, Mass. (96th Congress)

    Economic Stabilization

    Donald W. Riegle Jr., Mich. (96th Congress)

    Financial Institutions

    Thomas J. McIntyre, N.H. (95th Congress); Alan Cranston, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Housing and Urban Affairs

    John Sparkman, Ala. (95th Congress); Harrison A. Williams Jr., N.J. (96th Congress)

    Insurance

    Donald Stewart, Ala. (96th Congress)

    International Finance

    Adlai E. Stevenson, Ill.*

    Rural Housing and Development

    Robert Morgan, N.C.*

    Securities

    Harrison A. Williams Jr., N.J. (95th Congress); Paul S. Sarbanes, Md. (96th Congress)

    Budget

    Federal budget generally; Congressional Budget Office.

    • D 12 - R 8
    • Edmund S. Muskie, Maine (1975-April 1979)
    • Ernest F. Hollings, S.C. (April 1979-1980)
    • Henry Bellmon, Okla.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Commerce, Science and Transportation

    Interstate commerce in general, transportation, merchant marine and navigation, safety and transportation, Coast Guard, inland waterways except construction, communications, regulation of consumer products and services, standards and measurement, highway safety; science, engineering, and technology research and development and policy; non-military aeronautical and space sciences, marine fisheries, coastal zone management; oceans, weather and atmospheric activities.

    • D 10 - R 7
    • Warren G. Magnuson, Wash. (1973-77)
    • Howard W. Cannon, Nev. (1978-1980)
    • James B. Pearson, Kan. (95th Congress);
    • Bob Packwood, Ore. (96th Congress)
    Aviation

    Howard W. Cannon, Nev.*

    Communications

    Ernest F. Hollings, S.C.*

    Consumer

    Wendell H. Ford, Ky.*

    Merchant Marine and Tourism

    Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaii.*

    Science, Technology, and Space

    Adlai E. Stevenson, Ill.*

    Surface Transportation

    Russell B. Long, La.*

    Study Group National Ocean Policy

    Warren G. Magnuson, Wash. (95th Congress); Howard W. Cannon, Nev. (96th Congress)

    Energy and Natural Resources

    Energy policy generally; energy regulation and conservation; research and development; solar energy systems; naval petroleum; oil and gas; hydroelectric power; coal; mining; public parks and recreation areas (committee established in 1977).

    • D 11 - R 7
    • Henry M. Jackson, Wash. (1977-1980)
    • Clifford P. Hansen, Wyo.*
    Energy Conservation and Supply

    J. Bennett Johnston, La. (95th Congress); John A. Durkin, N.H. (96th Congress)

    Energy Regulation

    J. Bennett Johnston, La. (96th Congress)

    Energy Research and Development

    Frank Church, Idaho.*

    Energy Resources and Materials Production

    Wendell H. Ford, Ky. (96th Congress)

    Parks, Recreation, and Renewable Resources

    Dale Bumpers. Ark. (96th Congress)

    Environment and Public Works

    Environmental policy, research and development; ocean dumping, fisheries and wildlife, Outer Continental Shelf, solid waste disposal and recycling, toxic substances and other pesticides; public works, bridges and dams; water, air and noise pollution; federal buildings and grounds.

    • D 8 - R 6
    • Jennings Randolph, W.Va. (1966-1980)
    • Robert T. Stafford, Vt.*
    Environmental Pollution

    Edmund S. Muskie, Maine (95th Congress through April 1979); Mike Gravel, Alaska (1979-1980)

    Nuclear Regulation

    Gary Hart, Colo.*

    Regional and Community Development

    Quentin N. Burdick, N.D.*

    Resource Protection

    John C. Culver, Iowa.*

    Transportation

    Lloyd Bentsen, Texas.*

    Water Resources

    Mike Gravel, Alaska.*

    Finance

    Taxes, tariffs, foreign trade, import quotas, Social Security.

    • D 12 - R 8
    • Russell B. Long, La. (1965-1980)
    • Carl T. Curtis, Neb. (95th Congress);
    • Robert Dole, Kan. (96th Congress)
    Energy and Foundations

    Mike Gravel, Alaska.*

    Health

    Herman E. Talmadge, Ga.*

    International Trade

    Abraham Ribicoff, Conn.*

    Oversight of the Internal Revenue Service

    Floyd K. Haskell, Colo. (95th Congress); Max Baucus, Mont. (96th Congress)

    Private Pension Plans and Employee Fringe Benefits

    Lloyd Bentsen, Texas.*

    Public Assistance

    Daniel Patrick Moynihan, N.Y.*

    Revenue Sharing, Intergovernmental Revenue Impact, and Economic Problems

    Bill Bradley, N.J. (96th Congress)

    Social Security

    Gaylord Nelson, Wis.*

    Taxation and Debt Management Generally

    Harry F. Byrd Jr., Va.*

    Tourism and Sugar

    Spark M. Matsunaga, Hawaii*

    Unemployment and Related Problems

    William D. Hathaway, Maine (95th Congress); David L. Boren, Okla. (96th Congress)

    Foreign Relations

    Relations of the United States with foreign nations generally; treaties; International Red Cross; diplomatic service; United Nations; foreign loans.

    • D 9 - R 6
    • John Sparkman, Ala. (1975-1978)
    • Frank Church, Idaho (1979-1980)
    • Clifford P. Case, N.J. (95th Congress);
    • Jacob K. Javits, N.Y. (96th Congress)
    African Affairs

    Dick Clark, Iowa (95th Congress); George McGovern, S.D. (96th Congress)

    Arms Control, Oceans, International Operations, and Environment

    Claiborne Pell, R.I.*

    East Asian and Pacific Affairs

    John Glenn, Ohio.*

    European Affairs

    Joseph R. Biden Jr., Del.*

    International Economic Policy

    Frank Church, Idaho (95th Congress); Paul S. Sarbanes, Md. (96th Congress).

    Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs

    Richard Stone, Fla.*

    Western Hemisphere Affairs

    Paul S. Sarbanes, Md. (95th Congress); Edward Zorinsky, Neb. (96th Congress)

    Governmental Affairs

    Budget and accounting measures; reorganization of the executive branch; general governmental and administrative problems; intergovernmental relationship between the federal government and the states and municipalities, and between the United States and international organizations of which the United States is a member. (The committee took over some functions of the Post Office and Civil Service and the District of Columbia committees, which were abolished in 1977.)

    • D 9 - R 8
    • Abraham Ribicoff, Conn. (1977-1980)
    • Charles H. Percy, Ill.*
    Civil Service and General Services

    James R. Sasser, Tenn. (95th Congress); David Pryor, Ark. (96th Congress)

    Energy, Nuclear Proliferation and Federal Services

    John Glenn, Ohio.*

    Federal Spending Practices and Open Government

    Lawton Chiles, Fla.*

    Government Efficiency and the District of Columbia

    Thomas F. Eagleton, Mo.*

    Intergovernmental Relations

    Edmund S. Muskie, Maine 1977-1979; Jim Sasser, Tenn. (1979-1980)

    Investigations

    Henry M. Jackson, Wash. (95th Congress); Sam Nunn, Ga. (96th Congress)

    Oversight of Government Management

    Carl Levin, Mich. (96th Congress)

    Judiciary

    Federal courts and judges, penitentiaries, civil rights, civil liberties, constitutional amendments, monopolies and unlawful restraints of trade, interstate compacts, immigration and naturalization, apportionment of representatives, meetings of Congress and attendance of members, claims against the United States.

    • D 10 - R 7
    • James O. Eastland, Miss. (1956-1978)
    • Edward M. Kennedy, Mass. (1979-1980)
    • Strom Thurmond, S.C.*
    Administrative Practice and Procedure

    James Abourezk, S.D. (95th Congress); John C. Culver, Iowa (96th Congress).

    Antitrust, Monopoly and Business Rights

    Edward M. Kennedy, Mass. (95th Congress); Howard M. Metzenbaum, Ohio (96th Congress)

    Constitution

    Birch Bayh, Ind.*

    Criminal Justice

    John L. McClellan, Ark. (1977); Joseph R. Biden Jr., Del. (1978-1980).

    Improvements in Judicial Machinery

    Dennis DeConcini, Ariz.*

    Jurisprudence and Governmental Relations

    Howell Heflin, Ala. (96th Congress)

    Limitations of Contracted and Delegated Authority

    Max Baucus, Mont. (96th Congress)

    Labor and Human Resources

    Education, labor, health and public welfare generally.

    • D 9 - R 6
    • Harrison A. Williams Jr., N.J. (1971-1980)
    • Jacob K. Javits, N.Y.*
    Aging

    Thomas F. Eagleton, Mo.*

    Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

    William D. Hathaway, Maine (95th Congress); Donald W. Riegle Jr., Mich. (96th Congress)

    Child and Human Development

    Alan Cranston, Calif.*

    Education, Arts and Humanities

    Claiborne Pell, R.I.*

    Employment, Poverty and Migratory Labor

    Gaylord Nelson, Wis.*

    Handicapped

    Jennings Randolph, W.Va.*

    Health and Scientific Research

    Edward M. Kennedy, Mass.*

    Rules and Administration

    Senate administration generally, contested elections, presidential succession, management of the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, etc.

    • D 6 - R 4
    • Howard W. Cannon, Nev. (1973-1977)
    • Claiborne Pell, R.I. (1978-1980)
    • Mark O. Hatfield, Ore.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Select Ethics

    Studies and investigates standards and conduct of Senate members and employees and may recommend remedial action.

    • D 3 - R 3
    • Adlai E. Stevenson, Ill. (1977-1980)
    • Harrison “Jack” Schmitt, N.M.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Select Indian Affairs

    Legislation dealing with Indian affairs; studies all problems relating to Indians including but not limited to Indian land management and trust responsibilities, Indian education, health, special services and loan programs and Indian claims against the United States. (The committee was established in 1977.)

    • D 3 - R 2
    • James Abourezk, S.D. (1977-1978)
    • John Melcher, Mont. (1979-1980)
    • Mark O. Hatfield, Ore.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Select Intelligence

    Legislative and budgetary authority over the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other components of the federal intelligence community.

    • D 7 - R 6
    • Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaii (1976-1978)
    • Birch Bayh, Ind. (1978-1980)
    • Barry Goldwater, Ariz.*
    Budget Authorization

    William D. Hathaway, Maine (95th Congress); Daniel K. Inouye (96th Congress)

    Charters and Guidelines

    Walter D. Huddleston, Ky.*

    Collection and Production

    Adlai E. Stevenson, Ill.*

    Intelligence and the Rights of Americans

    Birch Bayh, Ind. (95th Congress); Joseph R. Biden Jr., Del. (96th Congress)

    Select Small Business

    Studies and investigates problems of small business and reports findings and makes recommendations to the Senate, but cannot report legislation.

    • D 10 - R 7
    • Gaylord Nelson, Wis. (1975-1980)
    • Lowell P. Weicker Jr., Conn.*
    Advocacy and the Future of Small Business

    John C. Culver, Iowa (95th Congress); Walter D. Huddleston, Ky. (96th Congress)

    Economic Development, Marketing, and the Family Farmer

    Sam Nunn, Ga.*

    Government Procurement

    William D. Hathaway, Maine (95th Congress); Robert Morgan, N.C. (96th Congress)

    Government Regulation and Paperwork

    John C. Culver, Iowa (96th Congress)

    Monopoly, Economic Concentration and Anticompetitive Activities

    Gaylord Nelson, Wis. (95th Congress); Jim Sasser, Tenn. (96th Congress)

    Taxation, Financing and Investment

    Floyd K. Haskell, Colo. (95th Congress); Dale Bumpers, Ark. (96th Congress)

    Special Aging

    Studies and investigates problems of the aging and reports findings and makes recommendations to the Senate, but cannot report legislation.

    • D 7 - R 5
    • Frank Church, Idaho (1971-1978)
    • Lawton Chiles, Fla. (1978-1980)
    • Pete V. Domenici, N.M.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Veterans' Affairs

    Veterans' measures generally, pensions, armed forces life insurance, rehabilitation, education, medical care and treatment of veterans, veterans' hospitals.

    • D 6 - R 4
    • Alan Cranston, Calif. (1977-1980)
    • Robert T. Stafford, Vt.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Political Committees

    Democratic Policy Committee

    (scheduling of legislation)—Robert C. Byrd, W. Va.*

    Democratic Legislative Review Committee

    Dale Bumpers, Ark.*

    Democratic Steering Committee

    (makes Democratic committee asignments)—Robert C. Byrd, W. Va.*

    Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee

    Wendell H. Ford, Ky., chairman; Howard M. Metzenbaum, Ohio, vice chairman.*

    Republican Policy Committee

    John Tower, Texas*

    Republican Committee on Committees

    Jake Garn, Utah (95th Congress); Henry Bellmon, Okla. (96th Congress)

    National Republican Senatorial Committee

    Bob Packwood, Ore. (95th Congress); John Heinz, Pa. (96th Congress)

    Republican Personnel Committee

    Robert Dole, Kan.*

    House Committees

    Agriculture

    Agriculture and forestry in general, farm credit and security, crop insurance, soil conservation, rural electrification and rural development.

    • D 27 - R 15
    • Thomas S. Foley, Wash. (1975-1980)
    • William C. Wampler, Va.*
    Conservation and Credit

    Walter B. Jones, N.C.*

    Cotton

    David R. Bowen, Miss.*

    Dairy and Poultry

    Charlie Rose, N.C. (95th Congress); Alvin Baldus, Wis. (96th Congress)

    Department Investigations, Oversight, and Research

    E. “Kika” de la Garza, Texas.*

    Domestic Marketing, Consumer Relations, and Nutrition

    Fred Richmond, N.Y.*

    Family Farms, Rural Development, and Special Studies

    Richard Nolan, Minn.*

    Forests

    James Weaver, Ore.*

    Livestock and Grains

    W. R. Poage, Texas (95th Congress); Charlie Rose, N.C. (96th Congress)

    Oilseeds and Rice

    Dawson Mathis, Ga.*

    Tobacco

    Walter B. Jones, N.C.*

    Appropriations

    Appropriations of government revenues.

    • D 36 - R 18
    • George H. Mahon, Texas (1964-1977)
    • Jamie L. Whitten, Miss. (1978-1980)
    • Elford A. Cederberg, Mich. (95th Congress);
    • Silvio O. Conte, Mass. (96th Congress)
    Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies

    Jamie L. Whitten, Miss.*

    Defense

    George H. Mahon, Texas (95th Congress); Joseph P. Addabbo, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    District of Columbia

    William H. Natcher, Ky. (95th Congress); Charles Wilson, Texas (96th Congress)

    Energy and Water Development

    Tom Bevill, Ala.*

    Foreign Operations

    Clarence D. Long, Md.*

    Housing and Urban Development-Independent Agencies

    Edward P. Boland, Mass.*

    Interior

    Sydney R. Yates, Ill.*

    Labor-Health, Education and Welfare

    Daniel J. Flood, Pa. (95th Congress); William H. Natcher, Ky. (96th Congress)

    Legislative

    George E. Shipley, Ill. (95th Congress); Adam Benjamin Jr., Ind. (96th Congress)

    Military Construction

    Gunn McKay, Utah.*

    State, Justice, Commerce and Judiciary

    John M. Slack, W. Va. (1977-March 1980); Neal Smith, Iowa (1980)

    Transportation

    John J. McFall, Calif. (95th Congress); Robert Duncan, Ore. (96th Congress)

    Treasury-Postal Service-General Government

    Tom Steed, Okla.*

    Armed Services

    All matters related to the national military establishment; conservation, development and use of naval petroleum and oil shale reserves; strategic and critical materials; scientific research and development in support of the armed services.

    • D 28 - R 15
    • Melvin Price, Ill. (1975-1980)
    • Bob Wilson, Calif.*
    Investigations

    Samuel S. Stratton, N.Y.*

    Military Compensation

    Bill Nichols, Ala.*

    Military Installations and Facilities

    Lucien N. Nedzi, Mich.*

    Military Personnel

    Richard C. White, Texas.*

    Procurement and Military Nuclear Systems

    Melvin price, Ill. (96th Congress)

    Research and Development

    Richard H. Ichord, Mo.*

    Seapower and Strategic and Critical Materials

    Charles E. Bennett, Fla.*

    NATO Standardization, Interoperability and Readiness

    (special subcommittee)—Dan Daniel, Va. (96th Congress)

    Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs

    Banks and banking, including deposit insurance and federal monetary policy; money and credit, including currency; gold and silver, including coinage; valuation and revaluation of the dollar; urban development; housing generally; economic stabilization; control of prices; international finance; financial aid to commerce and industry.

    • D 27 - R 15
    • Henry S. Reuss, Wis. (1975-1980)
    • J. William Stanton, Ohio*
    The City

    Henry S. Reuss, Wis.*

    Consumer Affairs

    Frank Annunzio, Ill.*

    Domestic Monetary Policy

    Parren J. Mitchell, Md.*

    Economic Stabilization

    William S. Moorhead, Pa.*

    Financial Institutions Supervision, Regulation and Insurance

    Fernand J. St Germain, R.I.*

    General Oversight and Renegotiation

    Joseph G. Minish, N.J.*

    Housing and Community Development

    Thomas L. Ashley, Ohio.*

    International Development Institutions and Finance

    Henry B. Gonzalez, Texas.*

    International Trade, Investment and Monetary Policy

    Stephen L. Neal, N.C.*

    Budget

    Federal budget generally; Congressional Budget Office.

    • D 17 - R 8
    • Robert N. Giaimo, Conn. (1977-1980)
    • Delbert L. Latta, Ohio.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    District of Columbia

    All measures relating to municipal affairs of the District of Columbia except its appropriations.

    • D 9 - R 5
    • Charles C. Diggs, Mich. (1973-1979)
    • Ronald V. Dellums, Calif. (1979-1980)
    • Stewart B. McKinney, Conn.*
    Fiscal Affairs and Health

    Ronald V. Dellums, Calif.*

    Government, Budget and Urban Affairs

    Walter E. Fauntroy, D.C.* (96th Congress)

    Judiciary, Manpower and Education

    Romano L. Mazzoli, Ky.*

    Metropolitan Affairs

    Fortney H. “Pete” Stark, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Education and Labor

    Education, labor and welfare matters.

    • D 23 - R 13
    • Carl D. Perkins, Ky. (1967-1980)
    • Albert H. Quie, Minn. (95th Congress);
    • John M. Ashbrook, Ohio (96th Congress)
    Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education

    Carl D. Perkins, Ky.*

    Employment Opportunities

    Augustus F. Hawkins, Calif.*

    Health and Safety

    Joseph M. Gaydos, Pa.*

    Human Resources

    Ike F. Andrews, N.C.*

    Labor-Management Relations

    Frank Thompson Jr., N.J.*

    Labor Standards

    John H. Dent, Pa. (95th Congress); Edward P. Beard, R.I. (96th Congress)

    Postsecondary Education

    William D. Ford, Mich.*

    Select Education

    John Brademas, Ind. (95th Congress); Paul Simon, Ill. (96th Congress)

    Foreign Affairs

    Relations of the United States with other nations and international organizations and movements (formerly named the International Relations Committee).

    • D 22 - R 12
    • Clement J. Zablocki, Wis. (1977-1980)
    • William S. Broomfield, Mich.*
    Africa

    Charles C. Diggs, Mich. (95th Congress); Stephen J. Solarz, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Asian and Pacific Affairs

    Lester L. Wolff, N.Y.*

    Europe and the Middle East

    Lee H. Hamilton, Ind.*

    Inter-American Affairs

    Gus Yatron, Pa.*

    International Economic Policy and Trade

    Jona-than B. Bingham, N.Y.*

    International Operations

    Dante B. Fascell, Fla. (96th Congress)

    International Organizations

    Donald M. Fraser, Minn. (95th Congress); Don Bonker, Wash. (96th Congress)

    International Security and Scientific Affairs

    Clement J. Zablocki, Wis.*

    Government Operations

    Budget and accounting measures; overall economy and efficiency of government, including federal procurement; reorganization in the executive branch; inter-governmental relations; general revenue sharing; National Archives.

    • D 25 - R 14
    • Jack Brooks, Texas (1975-1980)
    • Frank Horton, N.Y.*
    Commerce, Consumer and Monetary Affairs

    Benjamin S. Rosenthal, N.Y.*

    Environment, Energy and Natural Resources

    Leo J. Ryan, Calif. (95th Congress); Toby Moffett, Conn. (96th Congress)

    Government Activities and Transportation

    John L. Burton Calif.*

    Government Information and Individual Rights

    Richardson Preyer, N.C.*

    Intergovernmental Relations and Human Resources

    L. H. Fountain, N.C.*

    Legislation and National Security

    Jack Brooks, Texas.*

    Manpower and Housing

    Cardiss Collins, Ill.*

    House Administration

    House administration generally; printing and correcting of the Congressional Record; federal elections generally; management of the Library of Congress, supervision of the Smithsonian, etc.

    • D 16 - R 9
    • Frank Thompson Jr., N.J. (1976-1980)
    • William L. Dickinson, Ala.*
    Accounts

    John H. Dent, Pa. (95th Congress); John Brademas, Ind. (96th Congress)

    Contracts

    Joseph M. Gaydos, Pa.*

    Libraries and Memorials

    Lucien N. Nedzi, Mich.*

    Office Systems

    Robert H. Mollohan, W. Va.*

    Personnel and Police

    Frank Annunzio, Ill.*

    Printing

    Augustus F. Hawkins, Calif.*

    Services

    Ed Jones, Tenn.*

    Policy Group, Information and Computers

    Charlie Rose, N.C.*

    Interior and Insular Affairs

    Public lands, parks, natural resources, territorial possessions of the United States, Indian affairs.

    • D 26 - R 14
    • Morris K. Udall, Ariz. (1977-1980)
    • Joe Skubitz, Kan. (95th Congress);
    • Don H. Clausen, Calif. (96th Congress)
    Energy and the Environment

    Morris K. Udall, Ariz.*

    Mines and Mining

    Abraham Kazen, Texas (95th Congress); Jim Santini, Nev. (96th Congress)

    National Parks and Insular Affairs

    Phillip Burton, Calif.*

    Oversight/Special Investigations

    Harold Runnels, N.M. (died August 1980).

    Pacific Affairs

    Antonio Borja Won Pat, Guam (96th Congress)

    Public Lands

    John F. Seiberling, Ohio (96th Congress)

    Water and Power Resources

    Lloyd Meeds, Wash. (95th Congress); Abraham Kazen Jr., Texas (96th Congress)

    Interstate and Foreign Commerce

    Regulation of interstate and foreign commerce and communications; regulation of interstate transmission of power (except between government projects); inland waterways; railroads, railroad labor; securities and exchanges; interstate oil compacts; natural gas; health matters generally (except health care supported by payroll deductions); consumer affairs and consumer protection; travel and tourism; biomedical research and development.

    • D 27 - R 15
    • Harley O. Staggers, W. Va. (1966-1980)
    • Samuel L. Devine, Ohio*
    Communications

    Lionel Van Deerlin, Calif.*

    Consumer Protection and Finance

    Bob Eckhardt, Texas (95th Congress); James H. Scheuer, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Energy and Power

    John D. Dingell, Mich.*

    Health and the Environment

    Paul G. Rogers, Fla. (95th Congress); Henry A. Waxman, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Oversight and Investigations

    John E. Moss, Calif. (95th Congress); Bob Eckhardt, Texas (96th Congress)

    Transportation and Commerce

    Fred B. Rooney, Pa. (95th Congress); James J. Florio, N.J. (96th Congress)

    Judiciary

    Courts and judicial proceedings generally; constitutional amendments; civil rights; civil liberties; interstate compacts; immigration and naturalization; apportionment of representatives; meetings of Congress and attendance of members; presidential succession; national penitentiaries; patents; copyrights; trademarks; protection of trade and commerce against unlawful restraints and monopolies.

    • D 20 - R 11
    • Peter W. Rodino Jr., N.J. (1973-1980)
    • Robert McClory, Ill.*
    Administrative Law and Governmental Relations

    George E. Danielson, Calif.*

    Civil and Constitutional Rights

    Don Edwards, Calif.*

    Courts, Civil Liberties and the Administration of Justice

    Robert W. Kastenmeier, Wis.*

    Crime

    John Conyers Jr., Mich.*

    Criminal Justice

    James R. Mann, S.C. (95th Congress); Robert F. Drinan, Mass. (96th Congress)

    Immigration, Refugees, and International Law

    Joshua Eilberg, Pa. (95th Congress); Elizabeth Holtzman, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Monopolies and Commercial Law

    Peter W. Rodino Jr., N.J.*

    Merchant Marine and Fisheries

    Merchant marine generally; Coast Guard; oceanography and marine affairs; maintenance and operation of the Panama Canal and administration of the Canal Zone; fisheries and wildlife.

    • D 25 - R 14
    • John M. Murphy, N.Y. (1977-1980)
    • Philip E. Ruppe, Mich. (95th Congress);
    • Paul N. McCloskey Jr., Calif. (96th Congress)
    Coast Guard

    Mario Biaggi, N.Y.*

    Fisheries and Wildlife Conservation and the Environment

    Robert L. Leggett, Calif. (95th Congress); John B. Breaux, La. (96th Congress)

    Merchant Marine

    John M. Murphy, N.Y.*

    Oceanography

    John B. Breaux, La. (95th Congress); Gerry E. Studds, Mass. (96th Congress)

    Panama Canal

    Ralph Metcalfe, Ill. (95th Congress); Carroll Hubbard Jr., Ky. (96th Congress)

    Post Office and Civil Service

    Postal and federal civil services; census and the collection of statistics generally; Hatch Act; holidays and celebrations.

    • D 16 - R 9
    • Robert N.C. Nix, Pa. (1977-1978)
    • James M. Hanley, N.Y. (1979-1980)
    • Edward J. Derwinski, Ill.*
    Census and Population

    William Lehman, Fla. (95th Congress); Robert Garcia, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Civil Service

    William Clay, Mo. (95th Congress); Patricia Schroeder, Colo. (96th Congress)

    Compensation and Employee Benefits

    Gladys Noon Spellman, Md.*

    Human Resources

    Herbert E. Harris II, Va. (96th Congress)

    Investigations

    Robert N.C. Nix, Pa. (95th Congress); James M. Hanley, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Postal Operations and Services

    James M. Hanley, N.Y. (95th Congress); Charles H. Wilson, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Postal Personnel and Modernization

    Charles H. Wilson, Calif. (95th Congress); William Clay, Mo. (96th Congress)

    Public Works and Transportation

    Public buildings and roads; flood control; improvement of rivers and harbors; water power; pollution of navigable waters; transportation (except railroads).

    • D 31 - R 17
    • Harold T. Johnson, Calif. (1977-1980)
    • William H. Harsha, Ohio*
    Aviation

    Glenn M. Anderson, Calif.*

    Economic Development

    Robert Roe, N.J.*

    Oversight and Review

    Bo Ginn, Ga. (95th Congress); Norman Y. Mineta, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Public Buildings and Grounds

    Norman Y. Mineta, Calif. (95th Congress); Elliott H. Levitas, Ga. (96th Congress).

    Surface Transportation

    James J. Howard, N.J.*

    Water Resources

    Ray Roberts, Texas*

    Rules

    Rules and order of business of the House.

    • D 11 - R 5
    • James J. Delaney, N.Y. (1977-1978)
    • Richard Bolling, Mo. (1979-1980)
    • James H. Quillen, Tenn.*
    Legislative Process

    Gillis W. Long, La. (96th Congress)

    Rules of the House

    Joe Moakley, Mass. (96th Congress)

    Science and Technology

    Scientific and astronautical research and development generally; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Aeronautics and Space Council; National Science Foundation; outer space; science scholarships; Bureau of Standards; National Weather Service; civil aviation research and development; environmental research and development; energy research and development (except nuclear research and development).

    • D 27 - R 15
    • Olin E. Teague, Texas (1975-1978)
    • Don Fuqua, Fla. (1979-1980)
    • John W. Wydler, N.Y.*
    Energy Development and Applications

    Mike Mc-Cormack, Wash. (95th Congress); Richard L. Ottinger, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Energy Research and Production

    Mike McCormack, Wash. (96th Congress)

    Investigations and Oversight

    Jim Lloyd, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Natural Resources and Environment

    Jerome A. Ambro, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Science, Research and Technology

    Ray Thornton, Ark. (95th Congress); George E. Brown Jr., Calif. (96th Congress)

    Space Science and Applications

    Don Fuqua, Fla.*

    Transportation, Aviation and Communication

    Dale Milford, Texas (95th Congress); Tom Harkin, Iowa (96th Congress)

    Select Aging

    Studies and investigates problems of the aging.

    • D 30 - R 15
    • Claude Pepper, Fla. (1976-1980)
    • Bob Wilson, Calif. (95th Congress);
    • Charles E. Grassley, Iowa (96th Congress)
    Health and Long-Term Care

    Claude Pepper, Fla.*

    Housing and Consumer Interests

    Edward R. Roybal, Calif.*

    Human Services

    Mario Biaggi, N.Y.*

    Retirement Income and Employment

    Fred B. Rooney, Pa. (95th Congress); John L. Burton, Calif. (96th Congress)

    Select Committee on Committees

    Studies the committee system in the House of Representatives and reports findings and recommendations to the House (established in March 1979, disbanded in April 1980).

    • D 10 - R 5
    • Jerry M. Patterson, Calif.
    • James C. Cleveland, N.H.

    No standing subcommittees.

    Select Committee on Assassinations

    Established in 1976 to investigate the deaths of President John F. Kennedy and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (disbanded in 1979).

    • D 8 - R 4
    • Louis Stokes, Ohio (1977-1979)
    • Samuel L. Devine, Ohio (1977-1979)

    No standing subcommittees.

    Select Intelligence

    Legislative and budgetary authority over the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other components of the federal intelligence community (established in July 1977).

    • D 9 - R 5
    • Edward P. Boland, Mass. (1977-1980)
    • J. Kenneth Robinson, Va.*
    Evaluation

    Charlie Rose, N.C.*

    Legislation

    Morgan F. Murphy, Ill.*

    Oversight

    Les Aspin, Wis.*

    Program and Budget Authorization

    Bill D. Burlison, Mo.*

    Select Narcotics Abuse and Control

    Studies and reviews the problems of narcotics abuse and control, including international trafficking, enforcement, prevention, international treaties, organized crime, drug abuse in the U.S. armed forces, treatment and rehabilitation.

    • D 11 - R 6
    • Lester L. Wolff, N.Y. (1977-1980)
    • J. Herbert Burke, Fla. (95th Congress);
    • Tom Railsback, Ill. (96th Congress)

    No standing subcommittees.

    Select Outer Continental Shelf

    Studies and investigates policy for management of oil and natural gas in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), protection of marine and coastal environment, amendments of the OCS Lands Act and related measures (the committee was abolished in June 1980).

    • John M. Murphy, N.Y. (1977-1980)
    • Hamilton Fish, N.Y. (95th Congress);
    • Edwin B. Forsythe, N.J. (96th Congress)

    No standing subcommittees.

    Small Business

    Assistance to and protection of small business, including financial aid; participation of small business enterprises in federal procurement and government contracts.

    • D 25 - R 14
    • Neal Smith, Iowa (1977-1980)
    • Silvio O. Conte, Mass. (95th Congress);
    • Joseph M. McDade, Pa. (96th Congress)
    Access to Equity Capital and Business Opportunities

    John J. LaFalce, N.Y. (95th Congress); Henry J. Nowak, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Antitrust and Restraint of Trade Activities Affecting Small Business

    John Breckinridge, Ky. (95th Congress); Berkley Bedell, Iowa (96th Congress)

    General Oversight and Minority Enterprise

    Joseph P. Addabbo, N.Y. (95th Congress); John J. LaFalce, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Energy, Environment, Safety and Research

    Alvin J. Baldus, Wis., (95th Congress); Thomas A. Luken, Ohio (96th Congress)

    SBA and SBIC Authority and General Small Business Problems

    Neal Smith, Iowa.*

    Special Small Business Problems

    Marty Russo, Ill.*

    Standards of Official Conduct

    Studies and investigates standards of conduct of House members and employees and may recommend remedial action.

    • D 6 - R 6
    • Charles E. Bennett, Fla. (1977-1980)
    • Floyd Spence, S.C.*

    No standing subcommittees.

    Veterans' Affairs

    Veterans' measures generally; pensions, armed forces insurance, rehabilitation, education, medical care and treatment of veterans, veterans' hospitals and housing.

    • D 21 - R 11
    • Ray Roberts, Texas (1977-1980)
    • John Paul Hammerschmidt, Ark.*
    Compensation, Pension, Insurance and Memorial Affairs

    G. V. “Sonny” Montgomery, Miss.*

    Education, Training and Employment

    Olin E. Teague, Texas (95th Congress); W. G. “Bill” Hefner, N.C. (96th Congress)

    Housing

    Jack Brinkley, Ga.*

    Medical Facilities and Benefits

    David E. Satterfield III, Va.*

    Special Investigations

    Ronald M. Mottl, Ohio (96th Congress)

    Ways and Means

    Revenue measures generally; tariffs and trade agreements; Social Security.

    • D 24 - R 12
    • Al Ullman, Ore. (1975-1980)
    • Barber B. Conable Jr., N.Y.*
    Health

    Dan Rostenkowski, Ill. (95th Congress); Charles B. Rangel, N.Y. (96th Congress)

    Oversight

    Sam Gibbons, Fla. (96th Congress)

    Public Assistance and Unemployment Compensation

    James C. Corman, Calif.*

    Select Revenue Measures

    Dan Rostenkowski, Ill. (96th Congress)

    Social Security

    James A. Burke, Mass. (95th Congress); J. J. Pickle, Texas (96th Congress)

    Trade

    Charles A. Vanik, Ohio.*

    Political Committees

    Democratic Steering and Policy Committee

    (schedules legislation and makes Democratic committee assignments)—Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., Mass.*

    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

    James C. Corman, Calif.*

    Democratic Personnel Committee

    Joe Moakley, Mass.*

    Republican Committee on Committees

    (makes Republican committee assignments)—John J. Rhodes, Ariz.*

    Republican Policy Committee

    (advises on party action and policy)—Del Clawson, Calif. (95th Congress); Bud Shuster, Pa. (96th Congress)

    National Republican Congressional Committee

    Guy Vander Jagt, Mich.*

    Joint Committees

    Economic

    Studies and investigates all recommendations included in the president's annual Economic Report to Congress and reports findings and recommendations to the House and Senate.

    • Richard Bolling, Mo. (95th Congress)
    • Lloyd Bentsen, Texas (96th Congress)

    Library

    Studies and makes recommendations on proposals concerning the management and expansion of the Library of Congress.

    • Lucien N. Nedzi (95th Congress)
    • Claiborne Pell, R.I. (96th Congress)

    Printing

    Government printing generally; standards of paper, efficiency, distribution, Congressional Directory.

    • Howard W. Cannon (95th Congress)
    • Frank Thompson Jr., N.J. (96th Congress)

    Taxation

    Studies tax policies and makes recommendations to House Ways and Means and Senate Finance committees.

    • Al Ullman, Ore. (1977-1980)
    Members of Congress: 1945-1981

    The names in this index include, alphabetically, all senators, representatives, resident commissioners and territorial delegates who served in Congress from Jan 3, 1945, through May 1981—the 79th through the beginning months of the 97th Congress.

    The material is organized as follows: name; relationship to other members and presidents and vice presidents; party; state (of service); date of birth; date of death (if applicable); congressional service; service as president, vice president, member of the Cabinet or Supreme Court, governor, delegate to the Continental Congress, Speaker of the House, president pro tempore of the Senate and chairman of the Democratic or Republican National Committee. If the member changed parties during his or her congressional service, party designation appearing after the member's name is that which applied at the end of such service and further breakdown is included after dates of congressional service. Party designation is multiple only if the member was elected by two or more parties at the same time. Where service date is left open, member was still serving in the 97th Congress.

    Dates of service are inclusive, starting in year of service and ending when service ends. Under the constitution, service has been from January 3 to January 3 since 1934. In actual practice, members often have been sworn in on other dates at the beginning of a Congress. Exact date is shown (where available) if member began or ended his service in mid-term. The major source for this list was the Biographical Directory of the American Congress 1774-1971 compiled under the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing. Additional data were obtained from the files of the Joint Committee on Printing, the Congressional Directory and Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections and Weekly Report.

    A
    AANDAHL

    Fred George (R N.D.) April 9, 1897-April 7, 1966; House 1951-53; Gov. 1945-50.

    ABBITT

    Watkins Moorman (D Va.) May 21, 1908-—; House Feb. 17, 1948-73.

    ABDNOR

    James (R S.D.) Feb. 13, 1923-—; House 1973-81; Senate 1981-—.

    ABEL

    Hazel Hempell (R Neb.) July 10, 1888-July 30, 1966; Senate Nov. 8, 1954-Dec. 31, 1954.

    ABELE

    Homer E. (R Ohio) Nov. 21, 1916-—; House 1963-65.

    ABERNETHY

    Thomas Gerstle (D Miss.) May 16, 1903-—; House 1943-73.

    ABOUREZK

    James George (D S.D.) Feb. 24, 1931-—; House 1971-73; Senate 1973-79.

    ABZUG

    Bella Savitzky (D N.Y.) July 24, 1920-—; House 1971-77.

    ADAIR

    Edwin Ross (R Ind.) Dec. 14, 1907-—; House 1951-71.

    ADAMS

    Brockman (Brock) (D Wash.) Jan. 13, 1927-—; House 1965-Jan. 22, 1977; Secy. of Transportation 1977-July 20, 1979.

    ADAMS

    Sherman (R N.H.) Jan. 8, 1899-—; House 1945-47; Gov. 1949-53.

    ADDABBO

    Joseph P. (D N.Y.) March 17, 1925-—; House 1961-—.

    ADDONIZIO

    Hugh Joseph (D N.J.) Jan. 31, 1914-—; House 1949-June 30, 1962.

    AIKEN

    George David (R Vt.) Aug. 20, 1892-—; Senate Jan. 10, 1941-75; Gov. 1937-41.

    AKAKA

    Daniel K. (D Hawaii) Sept. 11, 1924-—; House 1977-—.

    ALBERT

    Carl Bert (D Okla.) May 10, 1908-—; House 1947-77; Speaker 1971-77.

    ALBOSTA

    Donald Joseph (D Mich.) Dec. 5, 1925-—; House 1979-—.

    ALEXANDER

    Hugh Quincy (D N.C.) Aug. 7, 1911-—; House 1953-63.

    ALEXANDER

    William Vollie Jr. (D Ark.) Jan. 16, 1934-—; House 1969-—.

    ALFORD

    Thomas Dale (D Ark.) Jan. 28, 1916-—; House 1959-63.

    ALGER

    Bruce Reynolds (R Texas) June 12, 1918-—; House 1955-65.

    ALLEN

    Asa Leonard (D La.) Jan. 5, 1891-Jan. 5, 1969; House 1937-53.

    ALLEN

    Clifford Robertson (D Tenn.) Jan. 6, 1912-June 18, 1978; House Nov. 25, 1975-June 18, 1978.

    ALLEN

    James Browning (D Ala.) Dec. 28, 1912-June 1, 1978; Senate 1969-June 1, 1978.

    ALLEN

    John Joseph Jr. (R Calif.) Nov. 27, 1899-—; House 1947-59.

    ALLEN

    Leo Elwood (R Ill.) Oct. 5, 1898-Jan. 19, 1973; House 1933-61.

    ALLEN

    Maryon Pittman (D Ala.) Nov. 30, 1925-—; Senate June 12, 1978-Nov. 7, 1978.

    ALLOTT

    Gordon Llewellyn (R Colo.) Jan. 2, 1907-—; Senate 1955-73.

    ALMOND

    James Lindsay Jr. (D Va.) June 15, 1898-—; House Jan. 22, 1946-April 17, 1948; Gov. 1958-62.

    AMBRO

    Jerome Anthony Jr. (D N.Y.) June 27, 1928-—; House 1975-81.

    AMMERMAN

    Joseph S. (D Pa.) July 14, 1924-—; House 1977-79.

    ANDERSEN

    Herman Carl (R Minn.) Jan. 27, 1897-July 26, 1978; House 1939-63.

    ANDERSON

    Clinton Presba (D N.M.) Oct. 23, 1895-Nov. 11, 1975; House 1941-June 30, 1945; Senate 1949-1973; Secy. of Agriculture 1945-48.

    ANDERSON

    Glenn M. (D Calif.) Feb. 21, 1913-—; House 1969-—.

    ANDERSON

    John B. (R Ill.) Feb. 15, 1922-—; House 1961-81.

    ANDERSON

    John Zuinglius (R Calif.) March 22, 1904-—; House 1939-53.

    ANDERSON

    LeRoy Hagen (D Mont.) Feb. 2, 1906-—; House 1957-61.

    ANDERSON

    Wendell Richard (D Minn.) Feb. 1, 1933-—; Senate Dec. 30, 1976-Dec. 29, 1978; Gov. 1971-76.

    ANDERSON

    William Robert (D Tenn.) June 17, 1921-—; House 1965-73.

    ANDRESEN

    August Herman (R Minn.) Oct. 11, 1890-Jan. 14, 1958; House 1925-33, 1935-Jan. 14, 1958.

    ANDREWS

    Arthur Glenn (R Ala.) Jan. 15, 1909-—; House 1965-67.

    ANDREWS

    Charles Oscar (D Fla.) March 7, 1877-Sept. 18, 1946; Senate Nov. 4, 1936-Sept. 18, 1946.

    ANDREWS

    Elizabeth Bullock (widow of George William Andrews) (D Ala.) Feb. 12, 1911-—; House April 4, 1972-73.

    ANDREWS

    George William (D Ala.) Dec. 12, 1906-Dec. 25, 1971; House March 14, 1944-Dec. 25, 1971.

    ANDREWS

    Ike Franklin (D N.C.) Sept. 2, 1925-—; House 1973-—.

    ANDREWS

    Mark (R N.D.) May 19, 1926-—; House Oct. 22, 1963-81; Senate 1981-—.

    ANDREWS

    Walter Gresham (R N.Y.) July 16, 1889-March 5, 1949; House 1931-49.

    ANFUSO

    Victor L'Episcopo (D N.Y.) March 10, 1905-Dec. 28, 1966; House 1951-53, 1955-63.

    ANGELL

    Homer Daniel (R Ore.) Jan. 12, 1875-March 31, 1968; House 1939-55.

    ANNUNZIO

    Frank (D Ill.) Jan. 12, 1915-—; House 1965-—.

    ANTHONY

    Beryl Franklin Jr. (D Ark.) Feb. 21, 1938-—; House 1979-—.

    APPLEGATE

    Douglas (D Ohio) March 27, 1928-—; House 1977-—.

    ARCHER

    William Reynolds Jr. (R Texas) March 22, 1928-—; House 1971-—.

    ARENDS

    Leslie Cornelius (R Ill.) Sept. 27, 1895-—; House 1935-Dec. 31, 1974.

    ARMSTRONG

    Orland Kay (R Mo.) Oct. 2, 1893-—; House 1951-53.

    ARMSTRONG

    William Lester (R Colo.) March 16, 1937-—; House 1973-79; Senate 1979-—.

    ARNOLD

    Samuel Washington (R Mo.) Sept. 21, 1879-Dec. 18, 1961; House 1943-49.

    ASHBROOK

    John Milan (son of William Albert Ashbrook) (R Ohio) Sept. 21, 1928-—; House 1961-—.

    ASHLEY

    Thomas William Ludlow (great-grandson of James Mitchell Ashley) (D Ohio) Jan. 11, 1923-—; House 1955-81.

    ASHMORE

    Robert Thomas (D S.C.) Feb. 22, 1904-—; House June 2, 1953-69.

    ASPIN

    Les (D Wis.) July 21, 1938-—; House 1971-—.

    ASPINALL

    Wayne Norviel (D Colo.) April 3, 1896-—; House 1949-73.

    ATKINSON

    Eugene Vincent (D Pa.) April 5, 1927-—; House 1979-—.

    AUCHINCLOSS

    James Coats (R N.J.) Jan. 19, 1885-Oct. 2, 1976; House 1943-65.

    AuCOIN

    Les (D Ore.) Oct. 21, 1942-—; House 1975-—.

    AUSTIN

    Warren Robinson (R Vt.) Nov. 12, 1877-Dec. 25, 1962; Senate April 1, 1931-Aug. 2, 1946.

    AVERY

    William Henry (R Kan.) Aug. 11, 1911-—; House 1955-65; Gov. 1965-67.

    AYRES

    William Hanes (R Ohio) Feb. 5, 1916-—; House 1951-71.

    B
    BADHAM

    Robert E. (R Calif.) June 9, 1929-—; House 1977-—.

    BADILLO

    Herman (D N.Y.) Aug. 21, 1929-—; House 1971-Dec. 31, 1977.

    BAFALIS

    Louis Arthur (R Fla.) Sept. 28, 1929-—; House 1973-—.

    BAILEY

    Cleveland Monroe (D W.Va.) July 15, 1886-July 13, 1965; House 1945-47, 1949-63.

    BAILEY

    Donald Allen (D Pa.) July 21, 1945-—; House 1979-—.

    BAILEY

    Josiah William (D N.C.) Sept. 14, 1873-Dec. 15, 1946; Senate 1931-Dec. 15, 1946.

    BAILEY

    Wendell (R Mo.) July 31, 1940-—; House 1981-—.

    BAKER

    Howard Henry (husband of Irene B. Baker, father of Howard Henry Baker Jr.) (R Tenn.) Jan. 12, 1902-Jan. 7, 1964; House 1951-Jan. 7, 1964.

    BAKER

    Howard Henry Jr. (son of Howard Henry Baker and Irene B. Baker, son-in-law of Everett McKinley Dirksen) (R Tenn.) Nov. 15, 1925-—; Senate 1967-—.

    BAKER

    Irene B. (widow of Howard Henry Baker, mother of Howard Henry Baker Jr.) (R Tenn.) Nov. 17, 1901-—; House March 10, 1964-65.

    BAKER

    LaMar (R Tenn.) Dec. 19, 1915-—; House 1971-75.

    BAKEWELL

    Claude Ignatius (R Mo.) Aug. 9, 1912-—; House 1947-49, March 9, 1951-53.

    BALDUS

    Alvin James (D Wis.) April 27, 1926-—; House 1975-81.

    BALDWIN

    Harry Streett (D Md.) Aug. 21, 1894-Oct. 19, 1952; House 1943-47.

    BALDWIN

    John Finley Jr. (R Calif.) June 28, 1915-March 9, 1966; House 1955-March 9, 1966.

    BALDWIN

    Joseph Clark (R N.Y.) Jan. 11, 1897-Oct. 27, 1957; House March 11, 1941-47.

    BALDWIN

    Raymond Earl (R Conn.) Aug. 31, 1893-—; Senate Dec. 27, 1946-Dec. 16, 1949; Gov. 1939-41, 1943-46.

    BALL

    Joseph Hurst (R Minn.) Nov. 3, 1905-—; Senate Oct. 14, 1940-Nov. 17, 1942, 1943-49.

    BANDSTRA

    Bert (D Iowa) Jan. 25, 1922-—; House 1965-67.

    BANKHEAD

    John Hollis 2d (son of John Hollis Bankhead, brother of William Brockman Bankhead, father of Walter Will Bankhead) (D Ala.) July 8, 1872-June 12, 1946; Senate 1931-June 12, 1946.

    BANTA

    Parke Monroe (R Mo.) Nov. 21, 1891-May 12, 1970; House 1947-49.

    BARDEN

    Graham Arthur (D N.C.) Sept. 25, 1896-Jan. 29, 1967; House 1935-61.

    BARING

    Walter Stephan (D Nev.) Sept. 9, 1911-July 13, 1975; House 1949-53, 1957-73.

    BARKLEY

    Alben William (D Ky.) Nov. 24, 1877-April 30, 1956; House 1913-27; Senate 1927-Jan. 19, 1949, 1955-April 30, 1956; Vice Pres. 1949-53.

    BARNARD

    D. Douglas Jr. (D Ga.) March 20, 1922-—; House 1977-—.

    BARNES

    Michael Darr (D Md.) Sept. 3, 1943-—; House 1979-—.

    BARR

    Joseph Walker (D Ind.) Jan. 17, 1918-—; House 1959-61; Secy. of the Treasury 1968-69.

    BARRETT

    Frank A. (R Wyo.) Nov. 10, 1892-May 30, 1962; House 1943-Dec. 31, 1950; Senate 1953-59; Gov. 1951-53.

    BARRETT

    William A. (D Pa.) Aug. 14, 1896-April 12, 1976; House 1945-47, 1949-April 12, 1976.

    BARRY

    Robert Raymond (R N.Y.) May 15, 1915-—; House 1959-65.

    BARRY

    William Bernard (D N.Y.) July 21, 1902-Oct. 20, 1946; House Nov. 5, 1935-Oct. 20, 1946.

    BARTLETT

    Dewey Follett (R Okla.) March 28, 1919-March 1, 1979; Senate 1973-79; Gov. 1967-71.

    BARTLETT

    Edward Lewis (Bob) (D Alaska) April 20, 1904-Dec. 11, 1968; House (Terr. Del.) 1945-59; Senate 1959-Dec. 11, 1968.

    BASS

    Perkins (R N.H.) Oct. 6, 1912-—; House 1955-63.

    BASS

    Ross (D Tenn.) March 17, 1918-—; House 1955-Nov. 3, 1964; Senate Nov. 4, 1964-67.

    BATES

    George Joseph (father of William Henry Bates) (R Mass.) Feb. 25, 1891-Nov. 1, 1949; House 1937-Nov. 1, 1949.

    BATES

    Joseph Bengal (D Ky.) Oct. 29, 1893-Sept. 10, 1965; House June 4, 1938-53.

    BATES

    William Henry (son of George Joseph Bates) (R Mass.) April 26, 1917-June 22, 1969; House Feb. 14, 1950-June 22, 1969.

    BATTIN

    James F. (R Mont.) Feb. 13, 1925-—; House 1961-Feb. 27, 1969.

    BATTLE

    Laurie Calvin (D Ala.) May 10, 1912-—; House 1947-55.

    BAUCUS

    Max Sieben (D Mont.) Dec. 11, 1941-—; House 1975-Dec. 14, 1978; Senate Dec. 15, 1978-—.

    BAUMAN

    Robert Edmund (R Md.) April 4, 1937-—; House Aug. 21, 1973-81.

    BAUMHART

    Albert David Jr. (R Ohio) June 15, 1908-—; House 1941-Sept. 2, 1942, 1955-61.

    BAYH

    Birch Evan (D Ind.) Jan. 22, 1928-—; Senate 1963-81.

    BEALL

    James Glenn (father of John Glenn Beall Jr.) (R Md.) June 5, 1894-Jan. 14, 1971; House 1943-53; Senate 1953-65.

    BEALL

    John Glenn Jr. (son of James Glenn Beall) (R Md.) June 19, 1927-—; House 1969-71; Senate 1971-77.

    BEAMER

    John Valentine (R Ind.) Nov. 17, 1896-Sept. 8, 1964; House 1951-59.

    BEARD

    Edward Peter (D R.I.) Jan. 20, 1940-—; House 1975-81.

    BEARD

    Robin Leo Jr. (R Tenn.) Aug. 21, 1939-—; House 1973-—.

    BECKER

    Frank John (R N.Y.) Aug. 27, 1899-—; House 1953-65.

    BECKWORTH

    Lindley Gary (D Texas) June 30, 1913-—; House 1939-53, 1957-67.

    BEDELL

    Berkley Warren (D Iowa) March 5, 1921-—; House 1975-—.

    BEERMANN

    Ralph F. (R Neb.) Aug. 13, 1912-Feb. 17, 1977; House 1961-65.

    BEGICH

    Nicholas J. (D Alaska) April 6, 1932-?; House 1971-72. (Disappeared in a plane Oct. 16, 1972 and presumed dead; congressional seat declared vacant Dec. 29, 1972.)

    BEILENSON

    Anthony Charles (D Calif.) Oct. 26, 1932-—; House 1977-—.

    BELCHER

    Page Henry (R Okla.) April 21, 1899-Aug. 2, 1980; House 1951-73.

    BELL

    Alphonzo (R Calif.) Sept. 19, 1914-—; House 1961-77.

    BELL

    Charles Jasper (D Mo.) Jan. 16, 1885-Jan. 21, 1978; House 1935-49.

    BELL

    John Junior (D Texas) May 15, 1910-Jan. 24, 1963; House 1955-57.

    BELLMON

    Henry (R Okla.) Sept. 3, 1921-—; Senate 1969-81; Gov. 1963-67.

    BENDER

    George Harrison (R Ohio) Sept. 29, 1896-June 18, 1961; House 1939-49, 1951-Dec. 15, 1954; Senate Dec. 16, 1954-57.

    BENEDICT

    Cleve (R W. Va.) March 21, 1935-—; House 1981-—.

    BENITEZ

    Jaime (PD P.R.) Oct. 29, 1908-—; House (Res Comm.) 1973-77.

    BENJAMIN

    Adam Jr. (D Ind.) Aug. 6, 1935-—; House 1977-—.

    BENNET

    Augustus Witschief (son of William Stiles Bennet) (R N.Y.) Oct. 7, 1897-—; House 1945-47.

    BENNETT

    Charles Edward (D Fla.) Dec. 2, 1910-—; House 1949-—.

    BENNETT

    John Bonifas (R Mich.) Jan. 10, 1904-Aug. 9, 1964; House 1943-45, 1947-Aug. 9, 1964.

    BENNETT

    Marion Tinsley (son of Philip Allen Bennett) (R Mo.) June 6, 1914-—; House Jan. 12, 1943-49.

    BENNETT

    Wallace Foster (R Utah) Nov. 13, 1898-—; Senate 1951-Dec. 20, 1974.

    BENTLEY

    Alvin Morell (R Mich.) Aug. 30, 1918-April 10, 1969; House 1953-61.

    BENTON

    William (D Conn.) April 1, 1900-March 18, 1973; Senate Dec. 17, 1949-53.

    BENTSEN

    Lloyd Millard Jr. (D Texas) Feb. 11, 1921-—; House Dec. 4, 1948-55; Senate 1971-—.

    BEREUTER

    Douglas K. (R Neb.) Oct. 6, 1939-—; House 1979-—.

    BERGLAND

    Bob Selmer (D Minn.) July 22, 1928-—; House 1971-Jan. 22, 1977; Secy. of Agriculture 1977-81.

    BERRY

    Ellis Yarnal (R S.D.) Oct. 6, 1902-—; House 1951-71.

    BETHUNE

    Edwin Ruthvin (R Ark.) Dec. 19, 1934-—; House 1979-—.

    BETTS

    Jackson Edward (R Ohio) May 26, 1904-—; House 1951-73.

    BEVILL

    Tom (D Ala.) March 27, 1921-—; House 1967-—.

    BIAGGI

    Mario (D N.Y.) Oct. 26, 1917-—; House 1969-—.

    BIBLE

    Alan Harvey (D Nev.) Nov. 20, 1909-—; Senate Dec. 2, 1954-Dec. 17, 1974.

    BIDEN

    Joseph Robinette Jr. (D Del.) Nov. 20, 1942-—; Senate 1973-—.

    BIEMILLER

    Andrew John (D Wis.) July 23, 1906-—; House 1945-47, 1949-51.

    BIESTER

    Edward G. Jr. (R Pa.) Jan. 5, 1931-—; House 1967-77.

    BILBO

    Theodore Gilmore (D Miss.) Oct. 13, 1877-Aug. 21, 1947; Senate 1935-Aug. 21, 1947; Gov. 1916-20, 1928-32.

    BINGHAM

    Jonathan Brewster (son of Hiram Bingham) (D N.Y.) April 24, 1914-—; House 1965-—.

    BISHOP

    Cecil William (Runt) (R Ill.) June 29, 1890-Sept. 21, 1971; House 1941-55.

    BLACKBURN

    Benjamin Bentley (R Ga.) Feb. 14, 1927-—; House 1967-75.

    BLACKNEY

    William Wallace (R Mich.) Aug. 28, 1876-March 14, 1963; House 1935-37, 1939-53.

    BLAKLEY

    William Arvis (D Texas) Nov. 17, 1898-Jan. 5, 1976; Senate Jan. 15-April 28, 1957, Jan. 3-June 14, 1961.

    BLANCHARD

    James Johnston (D Mich.) Aug. 8, 1942-—; House 1975-—.

    BLAND

    Schuyler Otis (D Va.) May 4, 1872-Feb. 16, 1950; House July 2, 1918-Feb. 16, 1950.

    BLANTON

    Leonard Ray (D Tenn.) April 10, 1930-—; House 1967-73; Gov. 1975-—.

    BLATNIK

    John Anton (D Minn.) Aug. 17, 1911-—; House 1947-Dec. 31, 1974.

    BLILEY

    Thomas J. Jr. (R Va.) Jan. 28, 1932-—; House 1981-—.

    BLITCH

    Iris Faircloth (D Ga.) April 25, 1912-—; House 1955-63.

    BLOOM

    Sol (D N.Y.) March 9, 1870-March 7, 1949; House 1923-March 7, 1949.

    BLOUIN

    Michael Thomas (D Iowa) Nov. 7, 1945-—; House 1975-79.

    BOGGS

    Corinne Claiborne (widow of Thomas Hale Boggs Sr.) (D La.) March 13, 1916-—; House March 20, 1973-—.

    BOGGS

    James Caleb (R Del.) May 15, 1909-—; House 1947-53; Senate 1961-73; Gov. 1953-60.

    BOGGS

    Thomas Hale Sr. (husband of Corinne Claiborne Boggs) (D La.) Feb. 15, 1914-?; House 1941-43, 1947-73. (Missing in a plane Oct. 16, 1972 and presumed dead; congressional seat declared vacant Jan. 3, 1973.)

    BOLAND

    Edward Patrick (D Mass.) Oct. 1, 1911-—; House 1953-—.

    BOLLING

    Richard Walker (D Mo.) May 17, 1916-—; House 1949-—.

    BOLTON

    Frances Payne (widow of Chester Castle Bolton, grand-daughter of Henry B. Payne, mother of Oliver Payne Bolton) (R Ohio) March 29, 1885-March 9, 1977; House Feb. 27, 1940-69.

    BOLTON

    Oliver Payne (son of Chester Castle Bolton and Frances Payne Bolton, great-grandson of Henry B. Payne) (R Ohio) Feb. 22, 1917-Dec. 13, 1972; House 1953-57, 1963-65.

    BOLTON

    William P. (D Md.) July 2, 1885-Nov. 22, 1964; House 1949-51.

    BONER

    William Hill (D Tenn.) Feb. 14, 1945-—; House 1979-—.

    BONIN

    Edward John (R Pa.) Dec. 23, 1904-—; House 1953-55.

    BONIOR

    David Edward (D Mich.) June 6, 1945-—; House 1977-—.

    BONKER

    Don Leroy (D Wash.) March 7, 1937-—; House 1975-—.

    BONNER

    Herbert Covington (D N.C.) May 16, 1891-Nov. 7, 1965; House Nov. 5, 1940-Nov. 7, 1965.

    BOREN

    David Lyle (son of Lyle H. Boren) (D Okla.) April 21, 1941-—; Senate 1979-—; Gov. 1975-79.

    BOREN

    Lyle H. (father of David Lyle Boren) (D Okla.) May 11, 1909-—; House 1937-47.

    BOSCH

    Albert Henry (R N.Y.) Oct. 30, 1908-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1960.

    BOSCHWITZ

    Rudolf Eli (R Minn.) Nov. 7, 1930-—; Senate Dec. 30, 1978-—.

    BOSONE

    Reva Zilpha Beck (D Utah) April 2, 1898-—; House 1949-53.

    BOTTUM

    Joseph H. (R S.D.) Aug. 7, 1903-—; Senate July 11, 1962-63.

    BOUQUARD

    Marilyn Lloyd (D Tenn.) Jan 3, 1929-—; House 1975-—.

    BOW

    Frank Townsend (R Ohio) Feb. 20, 1901-Nov. 13, 1972; House 1951-Nov. 13, 1972.

    BOWEN

    David Reece (D Miss.) Oct. 21, 1932-—; House 1973-—.

    BOWLER

    James Bernard (D Ill.) Feb. 5, 1875-July 18, 1957; House July 7, 1953-July 18, 1957.

    BOWLES

    Chester Bliss (D Conn.) April 5, 1901-—; House 1959-61; Gov. 1949-51.

    BOWRING

    Eva Kelly (R Neb.) Jan. 9, 1892-—; Senate April 16-Nov. 7, 1954.

    BOYKIN

    Frank William (D Ala.) Feb. 21, 1885-March 12, 1969; House July 30, 1935-63.

    BOYLE

    Charles Augustus (D Ill.) Aug. 13, 1907-Nov. 4, 1959; House 1955-Nov. 4, 1959.

    BRADEMAS

    John (D Ind.) March 2, 1927-—; House 1959-81.

    BRADLEY

    Frederick Van Ness (R Mich.) April 12, 1898-May 24, 1947; House 1939-May 24, 1947.

    BRADLEY

    Michael Joseph (D Pa.) May 24, 1897-Nov. 27, 1979; House 1937-47.

    BRADLEY

    William Warren (D N.J.) July 28, 1943-—; Senate 1979-—.

    BRADLEY

    Willis Winter (R Calif.) June 28, 1884-Aug. 27, 1954; House 1947-49.

    BRAMBLETT

    Ernest King (R Calif.) April 25, 1901-Dec. 27, 1966; House 1947-55.

    BRASCO

    Frank J. (D N.Y.) Oct. 15, 1932-—; House 1967-75.

    BRAY

    William Gilmer (R Ind.) June 17, 1903-June 4 1979; House 1951-75.

    BREAUX

    John Berlinger (D La.) March 1, 1944-—; House Sept. 30, 1972-—.

    BRECKINRIDGE

    John Bayne (D Ky.) Nov. 29, 1913-July 29, 1979; House 1973-79.

    BREEDING

    James Floyd (D Kan.) Sept. 28, 1901-Oct. 17, 1977; House 1957-63.

    BREEN

    Edward G. (D Ohio) June 10, 1908-—; House 1949-Oct. 1, 1951.

    BREHM

    Walter Ellsworth (R Ohio) May 25, 1892-—; House 1943-53.

    BREWSTER

    Daniel Baugh (D Md.) Nov. 23, 1923-—; House 1959-63; Senate 1963-69.

    BREWSTER

    Ralph Owen (R Maine) Feb. 22, 1888-Dec. 25, 1961; House 1935-41; Senate 1941-Dec. 31, 1952; Gov. 1925-29.

    BRICKER

    John William (R Ohio) Sept. 6, 1893-—; Senate 1947-59; Gov. 1939-45.

    BRIDGES

    Henry Styles (R N.H.) Sept. 9, 1898-Nov. 26, 1961; Senate 1937-Nov. 26, 1961; Gov. 1935-37.

    BRIGGS

    Frank Parks (D Mo.) Feb. 25, 1894-—; Senate Jan. 18, 1945-47.

    BRINKLEY

    Jack Thomas (D Ga.) Dec. 22, 1930-—; House 1967-—.

    BROCK

    Lawrence (D Neb.) Aug. 16, 1906-Aug. 28, 1968; House 1959-61.

    BROCK

    William Emerson III (grandson of William Emerson Brock) (R Tenn.) Nov. 23, 1930-—; House 1963-71; Senate 1971-77; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1977-81.

    BRODHEAD

    William McNulty (D Mich.) Sept. 12, 1941-—; House 1975-—.

    BROMWELL

    James E. (R Iowa) March 26, 1920-—; House 1961-65.

    BROOKE

    Edward W. (R Mass.) Oct. 26, 1919-—; Senate 1967-79.

    BROOKS

    Charles Wayland (R Ill.) March 8, 1897-Jan. 14, 1957; Senate Nov. 22, 1940-49.

    BROOKS

    Jack Bascom (D Texas) Dec. 18, 1922-—; House 1953-—.

    BROOKS

    Overton (nephew of John Holmes Overton) (D La.) Dec. 21, 1897-Sept. 16, 1961; House 1937-Sept. 16, 1961.

    BROOMFIELD

    William S. (R Mich.) April 28, 1922-—; House 1957-—.

    BROPHY

    John Charles (R Wis.) Oct. 8, 1901-Dec. 26, 1976; House 1947-49.

    BROTZMAN

    Donald Glenn (R Colo.) June 28, 1922-—; House 1963-65, 1967-75.

    BROUGHTON

    Joseph Melville (D N.C.) Nov. 17, 1888-March 6, 1949; Senate Dec. 31, 1948-March 6, 1949; Gov. 1941-45.

    BROWN

    Charles Harrison (D Mo.) Oct. 22, 1920-—; House 1957-61.

    BROWN

    Clarence J. (father of Clarence J. Brown Jr.) (R Ohio) July 14, 1893-Aug. 23, 1965; House 1939-Aug. 23, 1965.

    BROWN

    Clarence J. Jr. (son of Clarence J. Brown) (R Ohio) June 18, 1927-—; House Nov. 2, 1965-—.

    BROWN

    Ernest S. (R Nev.) Sept. 25, 1903-July 23, 1965; Senate Oct. 1-Dec. 1, 1954.

    BROWN

    Garry E. (R Mich.) Aug. 12, 1923-—; House 1967-79.

    BROWN

    George E. Jr. (D Calif.) March 6, 1920-—; House 1963-71, 1973-—.

    BROWN

    Hank (R Colo.) Feb. 12, 1940-—; House 1981-—.

    BROWN

    Paul (D Ga.) March 31, 1880-Sept. 24, 1961; House July 5, 1933-61.

    BROWNSON

    Charles Bruce (R Ind.) Feb. 5, 1914-—; House 1951-59.

    BROYHILL

    James T. (R N.C.) Aug. 19, 1927-—; House 1963-—.

    BROYHILL

    Joel Thomas (R Va.) Nov. 4, 1919-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1974.

    BRUCE

    Donald Cogley (R Ind.) April 27, 1921-Aug. 31, 1969; House 1961-65.

    BRUMBAUGH

    David Emmert (R Pa.) Oct. 8, 1894-April 22, 1977; House Nov. 2, 1943-47.

    BRUNSDALE

    Clarence Norman (R N.D.) July 9, 1891-Jan. 27, 1978; Senate Nov. 19, 1959-Aug. 7, 1960; Gov. 1951-57.

    BRYSON

    Joseph Raleigh (D S.C.) Jan. 18, 1893-March 10, 1953; House 1939-March 10, 1953.

    BUCHANAN

    Frank (husband of Vera Daerr Buchanan) (D Pa.) Dec. 1, 1902-April 27, 1951; House May 21, 1946-April 27, 1951.

    BUCHANAN

    John Hall Jr. (R Ala.) March 19, 1928-—; House 1965-81.

    BUCHANAN

    Vera Daerr (widow of Frank Buchanan) (D Pa.) July 20, 1902-Nov. 26, 1955; House July 24, 1951-Nov. 26, 1955.

    BUCK

    Clayton Douglas (great-grandnephew of John Middleton Clayton) (R Del.) March 21, 1890-Jan. 27, 1965; Senate 1943-49; Gov. 1929-37.

    BUCK

    Ellsworth Brewer (R N.Y.) July 3, 1892-Aug. 14, 1970; House June 6, 1944-49.

    BUCKLEY

    Charles Anthony (D N.Y.) June 23, 1890-Jan. 22, 1967; House 1935-65.

    BUCKLEY

    James Lane (C/R N.Y.) March 9, 1923-—; Senate 1971-77.

    BUCKLEY

    James Vincent (D Ill.) May 15, 1894-July 30, 1954; House 1949-51.

    BUDGE

    Hamer Harold (R Idaho) Nov. 21, 1910-—; House 1951-61.

    BUFFETT

    Howard Homan (R Neb.) Aug. 13, 1903-April 30, 1964; House 1943-49, 1951-53.

    BULWINKLE

    Alfred Lee (D N.C.) April 21, 1883-Aug. 31, 1950; House 1921-29, 1931-Aug. 31, 1950.

    BUMPERS

    Dale (D Ark.) Aug. 12, 1925-—; Senate 1975-—; Gov. 1971-75.

    BUNKER

    Berkeley Lloyd (D Nev.) Aug. 12, 1906-—; Senate Nov. 27, 1940-Dec. 6, 1942; House 1945-47.

    BURCH

    Thomas Granville (D Va.) July 3, 1869-March 20, 1951; House 1931-May 31, 1946; Senate May 31-Nov. 5, 1946.

    BURCHILL

    Thomas Francis (D N.Y.) Aug. 3, 1882-March 28, 1960; House 1943-45.

    BURDICK

    Quentin Northrop (son of Usher Lloyd Burdick, brother-in-law of Robert Woodrow Levering) (D N.D.) June 19, 1908-—; House 1959-Aug. 8, 1960; Senate Aug. 8, 1960-—.

    BURDICK

    Usher Lloyd (father of Quentin Northrop Burdick, father-in-law of Robert Woodrow Levering) (R N.D.) Feb. 21, 1879-Aug. 19, 1960; House 1935-45, 1949-59.

    BURGENER

    Clair Walter (R Calif.) Dec. 5, 1921-—; House 1973-—.

    BURGIN

    William Olin (D N.C.) July 28, 1877-April 11, 1946; House 1939-April 11, 1946.

    BURKE

    Frank Welsh (D Ky.) June 1, 1920-—; House 1959-63.

    BURKE

    J. Herbert (R Fla.) Jan. 14, 1913-—; House 1967-79.

    BURKE

    James Anthony (D Mass.) March 30, 1910-—; House 1959-—.

    BURKE

    Raymond Hugh (R Ohio) Nov. 4, 1881-Aug. 18, 1954; House 1947-49.

    BURKE

    Thomas A. (D Ohio) Oct. 30, 1898-Dec. 5, 1971; Senate Nov. 10, 1953-Dec. 2, 1954.

    BURKE

    Thomas Henry (D Ohio) May 6, 1904-Sept. 12, 1959; House 1949-51.

    BURKE

    Yvonne Brathwaite (D Calif.) Oct. 5, 1932-—; House 1973-79.

    BURKHALTER

    Everett Glenn (D Calif.) Jan. 19, 1897-May 24, 1975; House 1963-65.

    BURLESON

    Omar Truman (D Texas) March 19, 1906-—; House 1947-Dec. 31, 1978.

    BURLISON

    Bill Dean (D Mo.) March 15, 1933-—; House 1969-81.

    BURNS

    John Anthony (D Hawaii) March 30, 1909-April 5, 1975; House (Terr. Del.) 1957-Aug. 21, 1959; Gov. 1962-74.

    BURNSIDE

    Maurice Gwinn (D W.Va.) Aug. 23, 1902-—; House 1949-53, 1955-57.

    BURTON

    Clarence Godber (D Va.) Dec. 14, 1886-—; House Nov. 2, 1948-53.

    BURTON

    Harold Hitz (R Ohio) June 22, 1888-Oct. 28, 1964; Senate 1941-Sept. 30, 1945; Assoc. Justice Supreme Court 1945-58.

    BURTON

    John Lowell (brother of Phillip Burton) (D Calif.) Dec. 15, 1932-—; House June 25, 1974-—.

    BURTON

    Laurence Junior (R Utah) Oct. 30, 1926-—; House 1963-71.

    BURTON

    Phillip (brother of John Lowell Burton) (D Calif.) June 1, 1926-—; House Feb. 18, 1964-—.

    BUSBEY

    Fred Ernst (R Ill.) Feb. 8, 1895-Feb. 11, 1966; House 1943-45, 1947-49, 1951-55.

    BUSH

    Alvin Ray (R Pa.) June 4, 1893-Nov. 5, 1959; House 1951-Nov. 5, 1959.

    BUSH

    George Herbert Walker (son of Prescott Sheldon Bush) (R Texas) June 12, 1924-—; House 1967-71; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1973-74.

    BUSH

    Prescott Sheldon (father of George Herbert Walker Bush) (R Conn.) May 15, 1895-Oct. 8, 1972; Senate Nov. 4, 1952-63.

    BUSHFIELD

    Harlan John (husband of Vera Cahalan Bushfield) (R S.D.) Aug. 6, 1882-Sept. 27, 1948; Senate 1943-Sept. 27, 1948; Gov. 1939-43.

    BUSHFIELD

    Vera Cahalan (widow of Harlan John Bushfield) (R S.D.) Aug. 9, 1889-April 16, 1976; Senate Oct. 6-Dec. 26, 1948.

    BUTLER

    Hugh Alfred (R Neb.) Feb. 28, 1878-July 1, 1954; Senate 1941-July 1, 1954.

    BUTLER

    John Cornelius (R N.Y.) July 2, 1887-Aug. 13, 1953; House April 22, 1941-49, 1951-53.

    BUTLER

    John Marshall (R Md.) July 21, 1897-March 14, 1978; Senate 1951-63.

    BUTLER

    Manley Caldwell (R Va.) June 2, 1925-—; House Nov. 7, 1972-—.

    BUTTON

    Daniel Evan (R N.Y.) Nov. 1, 1917-—; House 1967-71.

    BYRD

    Harry Flood (father of Harry Flood Byrd Jr., nephew of Henry De La Warr Flood and Joel West Flood) (D Va.) June 10, 1887-Oct. 20, 1966; Senate 1933-Nov. 10, 1965; Gov. 1926-30.

    BYRD

    Harry Flood Jr. (son of Harry Flood Byrd) (D Va.) Dec. 20, 1914-—; Senate Nov. 12, 1965-—; (1965-71 Democrat, 1971-—Independent).

    BYRD

    Robert Carlyle (D W.Va.) Jan. 15, 1918-—; House 1953-59; Senate 1959-—.

    BYRNE

    Emmet Francis (R Ill.) Dec. 6, 1896-Sept. 25, 1974; House 1957-59.

    BYRNE

    James Aloysius (D Pa.) June 22, 1906-Sept. 3, 1980; House 1953-73.

    BYRNE

    William Thomas (D N.Y.) March 6, 1876-Jan. 27, 1952; House 1937-Jan. 27, 1952.

    BYRNES

    John William (R Wis.) June 12, 1913-—; House 1945-73.

    BYRON

    Beverly Barton Butcher (D Md.) July 26, 1932-—; House 1979-—.

    BYRON

    Goodloe Edgar (son of Katharine Edgar Byron and William Devereux Byron, great-grandson of Louis Emory McComas) (D Md.) June 22, 1929-Oct. 11, 1978; House 1971-Oct. 11, 1978.

    C
    CABELL

    Earle (D Texas) Oct. 27, 1906-Sept. 24, 1975; House 1965-73.

    CAFFERY

    Patrick Thomson (grandson of Donelson Cafferey) (D La.) July 6, 1932-—; House 1969-73.

    CAHILL

    William Thomas (R N.J.) June 25, 1912-—; House 1959-Jan. 19, 1970; Gov. 1970-74.

    CAIN

    Harry Pulliam (R Wash.) Jan. 10, 1906-March 3, 1979; Senate Dec. 26, 1946-53.

    CALLAN

    Clair Armstrong (D Neb.) March 20, 1920-—; House 1965-67.

    CALLAWAY

    Howard Hollis (Bo) (R Ga.) April 2, 1927-—; House 1965-67.

    CAMERON

    Ronald Brooks (D Calif.) Aug. 16, 1927-—; House 1963-67.

    CAMP

    Albert Sidney (D Ga.) July 26, 1892-July 24, 1954; House Aug. 1, 1939-July 24, 1954.

    CAMP

    John Newbold Happy (R Okla.) May 11, 1908-—; House 1969-75.

    CAMPBELL

    Carroll Ashmore Jr. (R S.C.) July 24, 1940-—; House 1979-—.

    CAMPBELL

    Courtney Warren (D Fla.) April 29, 1895-Dec. 22, 1971; House 1953-55.

    CAMPBELL

    Howard Edmond (R Pa.) Jan. 4, 1890-—; House 1945-47.

    CANFIELD

    Gordon (R N.J.) April 15, 1898-June 20, 1972; House 1941-61.

    CANNON

    Arthur Patrick (D Fla.) May 22, 1904-Jan. 23, 1966; House 1939-47.

    CANNON

    Clarence Andrew (D Mo.) April 11, 1879-May 12, 1964; House 1923-May 12, 1964.

    CANNON

    Howard Walter (D Nev.) Jan. 26, 1912-—; Senate 1959-—.

    CAPEHART

    Homer Earl (R Ind.) June 6, 1897-Sept. 3, 1979; Senate 1945-63.

    CAPOZZOLI

    Louis Joseph (D N.Y.) March 6, 1901-—; House 1941-45.

    CAPPER

    Arthur (R Kan.) July 14, 1865-Dec. 19, 1951; Senate 1919-49; Gov. 1915-19.

    CAPUTO

    Bruce F. (R N.Y.) Aug. 7, 1943-—; House 1977-—.

    CAREY

    Hugh Leo (D N.Y.) April 11, 1919-—; House 1961-Dec. 31, 1974; Gov. 1975-—.

    CARLSON

    Cliffard Dale (R Ill.) Dec. 30, 1915-Aug. 28, 1977; House April 4, 1972-73.

    CARLSON

    Frank (R Kan.) Jan. 23, 1893-—; House 1935-47; Senate Nov. 29, 1950-69; Gov. 1947-50.

    CARLYLE

    Frank Ertel (D N.C.) April 7, 1897-Oct. 2, 1960; House 1949-57.

    CARMAN

    Gregory W. (R N.Y.) Jan. 31, 1937-—; House 1981-—.

    CARNAHAN

    Albert Sidney Johnson (D Mo.) Jan. 9, 1897-March 24, 1968; House 1945-47, 1949-61.

    CARNEY

    Charles Joseph (D Ohio) April 17, 1913-—; House Nov. 3, 1970-79.

    CARNEY

    William (R N.Y.) July 1, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    CARR

    Milton Robert (D Mich.) March 27, 1943-—; House 1975-81.

    CARRIER

    Chester Otto (R Ky.) May 5, 1897-—; House Nov. 30, 1943-45.

    CARRIGG

    Joseph Leonard (R Pa.) Feb. 23, 1901-—; House Nov. 6, 1951-59.

    CARROLL

    John Albert (D Colo.) July 39, 1901-—; House 1947-51; Senate 1957-63.

    CARSON

    Henderson Haverfield (R Ohio) Oct. 25, 1893-Oct. 5, 1971; House 1943-45, 1947-49.

    CARTER

    Steven V. (D Iowa) Oct. 8, 1915-Nov. 4, 1959; House Jan. 3-Nov. 4, 1959.

    CARTER

    Tim Lee (R Ky.) Sept. 2, 1910-—; House 1965-81.

    CARVILLE

    Edward Peter (D Nev.) May 14, 1885-June 27, 1956; Senate July 25, 1945-47; Gov. 1939-45.

    CASE

    Clifford Philip (R N.J.) April 16, 1904-—; House 1945-Aug. 16, 1953; Senate 1955-79.

    CASE

    Francis Higbee (R S.D.) Dec. 9, 1896-June 22, 1962; House 1937-51; Senate 1951-June 22, 1962.

    CASEY

    Robert Randolph (Bob) (D Texas) July 17, 1915-—; House 1959-Jan. 22, 1976.

    CAVALCANTE

    Anthony (D Pa.) Feb. 6, 1897-Oct. 29, 1966; House 1949-51.

    CAVANAUGH

    John J. III (D Neb.) Aug. 1, 1945-—; House 1977-81.

    CEDERBERG

    Elford Alfred (R Mich.) March 6, 1918-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1978.

    CELLER

    Emanuel (D N.Y.) May 6, 1888-Jan. 15, 1981; House 1923-73.

    CHADWICK

    E. Wallace (R Pa.) Jan. 17, 1884-Aug. 18, 1969; House 1947-49.

    CHAFEE

    John Hubbard (R R.I.) Oct. 22, 1922-—; Senate Dec. 29, 1976-—; Gov. 1963-69.

    CHAMBERLAIN

    Charles Ernest (R Mich.) July 22, 1917-—; House 1957-Dec. 31, 1974.

    CHANDLER

    Albert Benjamin (D Ky.) July 14, 1898-—; Senate Oct. 10, 1939-Nov. 1, 1945; Gov. 1935-39, 1955-59.

    CHAPMAN

    Virgil Munday (D Ky.) March 15, 1895-March 8, 1951; House 1925-29, 1931-49; Senate 1949-March 8, 1951.

    CHAPPELL

    William Venroe Jr. (D Fla.) Feb. 3, 1922-—; House 1969-—.

    CHAPPIE

    Eugene A. (R Calif.) March 21, 1920-—; House 1981-—.

    CHASE

    Jackson Burton (R Neb.) Aug. 19, 1890-May 5, 1974; House 1955-57.

    CHATHAM

    Richard Thurmond (D N.C.) Aug. 16, 1896-Feb. 5, 1957; House 1949-57.

    CHAVEZ

    Dennis (D N.M.) April 8, 1888-Nov. 18, 1962; House 1931-35; Senate May 11, 1935-Nov. 18, 1962.

    CHELF

    Frank Leslie (D Ky.) Sept. 22, 1907-—; House 1945-67.

    CHENEY

    Richard Bruce (R Wyo.) Jan. 30, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    CHENOWETH

    John Edgar (R Colo.) Aug. 17, 1897-—; House 1941-49, 1951-65.

    CHESNEY

    Chester Anton (D Ill.) March 9, 1916-—; House 1949-51.

    CHILES

    Lawton Mainor Jr. (D Fla.) April 3, 1930-—; Senate 1971-—.

    CHIPERFIELD

    Robert Bruce (son of Burnett Mitchell Chiperfield) (R Ill.) Nov. 20, 1899-April 9, 1971; House 1939-63.

    CHISHOLM

    Shirley Anita (D N.Y.) Nov. 30, 1924-—; House 1969-—.

    CHRISTOPHER

    George Henry (D Mo.) Dec. 9, 1888-Jan. 23, 1959; House 1949-51, 1955-Jan. 23, 1959.

    CHUDOFF

    Earl (D Pa.) Nov. 16, 1907-—; House 1949-Jan. 5, 1958.

    CHURCH

    Frank Forrester (D Idaho) July 25, 1924-—; Senate 1957-81.

    CHURCH

    Marguerite Stitt (widow of Ralph Edwin Church) (R Ill.) Sept. 13, 1892-—; House 1951-63.

    CHURCH

    Ralph Edwin (husband of Marguerite Stitt Church) (R Ill.) May 5, 1883-March 21, 1950; House 1935-41, 1943-March 21, 1950.

    CLANCY

    Donald D. (R Ohio) July 24, 1921-—; House 1961-77.

    CLARDY

    Kit Francis (R Mich.) June 17, 1892-Sept. 5, 1961; House 1953-55.

    CLARK

    Frank Monroe (D Pa.) Dec. 24, 1915-—; House 1955-Dec. 31, 1974.

    CLARK

    Jerome Bayard (D N.C.) April 5, 1882-Aug. 26, 1959; House 1929-49.

    CLARK

    Joseph Sill (D Pa.) Oct. 21, 1901-—; Senate 1957-69.

    CLARK

    Richard Clarence (D Iowa) Sept. 14, 1929-—; Senate 1973-79.

    CLASON

    Charles Russell (R Mass.) Sept. 3, 1890-—; House 1937-49.

    CLAUSEN

    Don Holst (R Calif.) April 27, 1923-—; House Jan. 22, 1963-—.

    CLAWSON

    Delwin (Del) Morgan (R Calif.) Jan. 11, 1914-—; House June 11, 1963-Dec. 31, 1978.

    CLAY

    William Lacey (D Mo.) April 30, 1931-—; House 1969-—.

    CLEMENTE

    Louis Gary (D N.Y.) June 10, 1908-May 13, 1968; House 1949-53.

    CLEMENTS

    Earle C. (D Ky.) Oct. 22, 1896-—; House 1945-Jan. 6, 1948; Senate Nov. 27, 1950-57; Gov. Jan. 1948-Nov. 1950.

    CLEVELAND

    James Colgate (R N.H.) June 13, 1920-—; House 1963-81.

    CLEVENGER

    Cliff (R Ohio) Aug. 20, 1885-Dec. 13, 1960; House 1939-59.

    CLEVENGER

    Raymond Francis (D Mich.) June 6, 1926-—; House 1965-67.

    CLINGER

    William Floyd Jr. (R Pa.) April 4, 1929-—; House 1979-—.

    CLIPPINGER

    Roy (R Ill.) Jan. 13, 1886-Dec. 24, 1962; House Nov. 6, 1945-49.

    COAD

    Merwin (D Iowa) Sept. 28, 1924-—; House 1957-63.

    COATS

    Daniel R. (R Ind.) May 16, 1943-—; House 1981-—.

    COCHRAN

    John Joseph (D Mo.) Aug. 11, 1880-March 6, 1947; House Nov. 2, 1926-47.

    COCHRAN

    William Thad (R Miss.) Dec. 7, 1937-—; House 1973-Dec. 26, 1978; Senate Dec. 27, 1978-—.

    COELHO

    Anthony Lee (D Calif.) June 15, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    COFFEE

    John Main (D Wash.) Jan. 23, 1897-—; House 1937-47.

    COFFEY

    Robert Lewis Jr. (D Pa.) Oct. 21, 1918-April 20, 1949; House Jan. 3-April 20, 1949.

    COFFIN

    Frank Morey (D Maine) July 11, 1919-—; House 1957-61.

    COFFIN

    Howard Aldridge (R Mich.) June 11, 1877-Feb. 28, 1956; House 1947-49.

    COHELAN

    Jeffrey (D Calif.) June 24, 1914-—; House 1959-71.

    COHEN

    William Sebastian (R Maine) Aug. 28, 1940-—; House 1973-79; Senate 1979-—.

    COLE

    Albert McDonald (R Kan.) Oct. 13, 1901-—; House 1945-53.

    COLE

    William Clay (R Mo.) Aug. 29, 1897-Sept. 23, 1965; House 1943-49, 1953-55.

    COLE

    William Sterling (R N.Y.) April 18, 1904-—; House 1935-Dec. 1, 1957.

    COLEMAN

    E. Thomas (R Mo.) May 29, 1943-—; House Nov. 2, 1976-—.

    COLLIER

    Harold Reginald (R Ill.) Dec. 12, 1915-—; House 1957-75.

    COLLINS

    Cardiss (widow of George Washington Collins) (D Ill.) Sept. 24, 1931-—; House June 5, 1973-—.

    COLLINS

    George Washington (D Ill.) March 5, 1925-Dec. 8, 1972; House Nov. 3, 1970-Dec. 8, 1972.

    COLLINS

    James M. (R Texas) April 29, 1916-—; House Aug. 24, 1968-—.

    COLMER

    William Meyers (D Miss.) Feb. 11, 1890-Sept. 9, 1980; House 1933-73.

    COMBS

    Jesse Martin (D Texas) July 7, 1889-Aug. 21, 1953; House 1945-53.

    COMPTON

    C. H. Ranulf (R Conn.) Sept. 16, 1878-Jan. 26, 1974; House 1943-45.

    CONABLE

    Barber B. Jr. (R N.Y.) Nov. 2, 1922-—; House 1965-—.

    CONDON

    Robert Likens (D Calif.) Nov. 10, 1912-June 3, 1976; House 1953-55.

    CONLAN

    John Bertrand (R Ariz.) Sept. 17, 1930-—; House 1973-77.

    CONNALLY

    Thomas Terry (Tom) (D Texas) Aug. 19, 1877-Oct. 28, 1963; House 1917-29; Senate 1929-53.

    CONOVER

    William Sheldrick II (R Pa.) Aug. 27, 1928-—; House April 25, 1972-73.

    CONTE

    Silvio Otto (R Mass.) Nov. 9, 1921-—; House 1959-—.

    CONYERS

    John Jr. (D Mich.) May 16, 1929-—; House 1965-—.

    COOK

    Marlow Webster (R Ky.) July 27, 1926-—; Senate Dec. 17, 1968-Dec. 27, 1974.

    COOK

    Robert Eugene (D Ohio) May 19, 1920-—; House 1959-63.

    COOLEY

    Harold Dunbar (D N.C.) July 26, 1897-Jan. 15, 1974; House July 7, 1934-67.

    COON

    Samuel Harrison (R Ore.) April 15, 1903-—; House 1953-57.

    COOPER

    Jere (D Tenn.) July 20, 1893-Dec. 18, 1957; House 1929-Dec. 18, 1957.

    COOPER

    John Sherman (R Ky.) Aug. 23, 1901-—; Senate Nov. 6, 1946-49, Nov. 5, 1952-55, Nov. 7, 1956-73.

    CORBETT

    Robert James (R Pa.) Aug. 25, 1905-April 25, 1971; House 1939-41, 1945-April 25, 1971.

    CORCORAN

    Thomas J. (R Ill.) May 23, 1939-—; House 1977-—.

    CORDON

    Guy (R Ore.) April 24, 1890-June 8, 1969; Senate March 4, 1944-55.

    CORDOVA

    Jorge Luis (New Prog. P.R.) April 20, 1907-—; House (Res. Comm.) 1969-73.

    CORMAN

    James C. (D Calif.) Oct. 20, 1920-—; House 1961-81.

    CORNELL

    Robert John (D Wis.) Dec. 16, 1919-—; House 1975-79.

    CORNWELL

    David Lance (D Ind.) June 14, 1945-—; House 1977-79.

    CORRADA del RIO

    Balthazar (New Prog. P.R.) April 10, 1935-—; House (Res. Comm.) 1977-—.

    COTTER

    William Ross (D Conn.) July 18, 1926-—; House 1971-—.

    COTTON

    Norris (R N.H.) May 11, 1900-—; House 1947-Nov. 7, 1954; Senate Nov. 8, 1954-Dec. 31, 1974; Aug. 8-Sept. 18, 1975.

    COUDERT

    Frederick Rene Jr. (R N.Y.) May 7, 1898-May 21, 1972; House 1947-59.

    COUGHLIN

    Robert Lawrence (nephew of Clarence Dennis Coughlin) (R Pa.) April 11, 1929-—; House 1969-—.

    COURTER

    James Andrew (R N.J.) Oct. 14, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    COURTNEY

    William Wirt (D Tenn.) Sept. 7, 1889-April 6, 1961; House May 11, 1939-49.

    COWGER

    William Owen (R Ky.) Jan. 1, 1922-Oct. 2, 1971; House 1967-71.

    COX

    Edward Eugene (D Ga.) April 3, 1880-Dec. 24, 1952; House 1925-Dec. 24, 1952.

    COYNE

    James K. (R Pa.) Nov. 17, 1946-—; House 1981-—.

    COYNE

    William J. (D Pa.) Aug. 24, 1936-—; House 1981-—.

    CRAIG

    Larry E. (R Idaho) July 20, 1945-—; House 1981-—.

    CRALEY

    Nathaniel Nieman Jr. (D Pa.) Nov. 17, 1927-—; House 1965-67.

    CRAMER

    William Cato (R Fla.) Aug. 4, 1922-—; House 1955-71.

    CRANE

    Philip M. (R Ill.) Nov. 3, 1930-—; House Nov. 25, 1969-—.

    CRANE

    Daniel Bever (R Ill.) Jan. 10, 1936-—; House 1979-—.

    CRANSTON

    Alan (D Calif.) June 19, 1914-—; Senate 1969-—.

    CRAVENS

    William Fadjo (son of William Ben Cravens) (D Ark.) Feb. 15, 1889-April 16, 1974; House Sept. 12, 1939-49.

    CRAWFORD

    Fred Lewis (R Mich.) May 5, 1888-April 13, 1957; House 1935-53.

    CRETELLA

    Albert William (R Conn.) April 22, 1897-May 24, 1979; House 1953-59.

    CRIPPA

    Edward David (R Wyo.) April 8, 1899-Oct. 20, 1960; Senate June 24-Nov. 28, 1954.

    CROCKETT

    George W. Jr. (D Mich.) Aug. 10, 1909-; House Nov. 12, 1980.

    CRONIN

    Paul William (R Mass.) March 14, 1938-—; House 1973-75.

    CROOK

    Thurman Charles (D Ind.) July 18, 1891-—; House 1949-51.

    CROSSER

    Robert (D Ohio) June 7, 1874-June 3, 1957; House 1913-19, 1923-55.

    CROW

    William Josiah (son of William Evans Crow) (R Pa.) Jan. 22, 1902-Oct. 13, 1974; House 1947-49.

    CRUMPACKER

    Shepard J. Jr. (cousin of Edgar Dean Crumpacker and Maurice Edgar Crumpacker) (R Ind.) Feb. 13, 1917-—; House 1951-57.

    CULVER

    John Chester (D Iowa) Aug. 8, 1932-—; House 1965-75; Senate 1975-81.

    CUNNINGHAM

    Glenn Clarence (R Neb.) Sept. 10, 1912-—; House 1957-71.

    CUNNINGHAM

    Paul Harvey (R Iowa) June 15, 1890-July 16, 1961; House 1941-59.

    CUNNINHAM

    John Edward III (R Wash.) March 27, 1931-—; House May 23, 1977-Jan. 3, 1979.

    CURLEY

    James Michael (D Mass.) Nov. 20, 1874-Nov. 12, 1958; House 1911-Feb. 4, 1914, 1943-47; Gov. 1935-37.

    CURLIN

    William Prather Jr. (D Ky.) Nov. 30, 1933-—; House Dec. 4, 1971-73.

    CURTIN

    Willard Sevier (R Pa.) Nov. 18, 1905-—; House 1957-67.

    CURTIS

    Carl Thomas (R Neb.) March 15, 1905-—; House 1939-Dec. 31, 1954; Senate Jan. 1, 1955-79.

    CURTIS

    Laurence (R Mass.) Sept. 3, 1893-—; House 1953-63.

    CURTIS

    Thomas Bradford (R Mo.) May 14, 1911-—; House 1951-69.

    D
    DADDARIO

    Emilio Quincy (D Conn.) Sept. 24, 1918-—; House 1959-71.

    DAGUE

    Paul Bartram (R Pa.) May 19, 1898-Dec. 2, 1974; House 1947-67.

    D'ALESANDRO

    Thomas Jr. (D Md.) Aug. 1, 1903-—; House 1939-May 16, 1947.

    D'AMATO

    Alfonse M. (R N.Y.) Aug. 1, 1937-—; Senate 1981-—.

    D'AMOURS

    Norman Edward (D N.H.) Oct. 14, 1937-—; House 1975-—.

    DANFORTH

    John Claggett (R Mo.) Sept. 5, 1936-—; Senate Dec. 27, 1976-—.

    DANIEL

    Charles Ezra (D S.C.) Nov. 11, 1895-Sept. 13, 1964; Senate Sept. 6-Dec. 23, 1954.

    DANIEL

    Price Marion (D Texas) Oct. 10, 1910-—; Senate 1953-Jan. 14, 1957; Gov. Jan. 15, 1957-Jan. 15, 1963.

    DANIEL

    Robert Williams Jr. (R Va.) March 17, 1936-—; House 1973-—.

    DANIEL

    W. C. (Dan) (D Va.) May 12, 1914-—; House 1969-—.

    DANIELS

    Dominick V. (D N.J.) Oct. 18, 1908-—; House 1959-77.

    DANIELSON

    George Elmore (D Calif.) Feb. 20, 1915-—; House 1971-—.

    DANNEMEYER

    William Edward (R Calif.) Sept. 22, 1929-—; House 1979-—.

    DARBY

    Harry (R Kan.) Jan. 23, 1895-—; Senate Dec. 2, 1949-Nov. 28, 1950.

    DASCHLE

    Thomas Andrews (D S.D.) Dec. 9, 1947-—; House 1979-—.

    DAUB

    Harold J. Jr. (R Neb.) April 23, 1941-—; House 1981-—.

    DAUGHTON

    Ralph Hunter (D Va.) Sept. 23, 1885-Dec. 22, 1958; House Nov. 7, 1944-47.

    DAVENPORT

    Harry James (D Pa.) Aug. 28, 1902-Dec. 19, 1977; House 1949-51.

    DAVIDSON

    Irwin Delmore (D/L N.Y.) Jan. 2, 1906-—; House 1955-Dec. 31, 1956.

    DAVIES

    John Clay (D N.Y.) May 1, 1920-—; House 1949-51.

    DAVIS

    Clifford (D Tenn.) Nov. 18, 1897-June 8, 1970; House Feb. 15, 1940-65.

    DAVIS

    Glenn Robert (R Wis.) Oct. 28, 1914-—; House April 22, 1947-57, 1965-Dec. 31, 1974.

    DAVIS

    James Curran (D Ga.) May 17, 1895-—; House 1947-63.

    DAVIS

    John William (D Ga.) Sept. 12, 1916-—; House 1961-75.

    DAVIS

    Mendel Jackson (D S.C.) Oct. 23, 1942-—; House April 27, 1971-81.

    DAVIS

    Robert William (R Mich.) July 31, 1932-—; House 1979-—.

    DAWSON

    William Adams (R Utah) Nov. 5, 1903-—; House 1947-49, 1953-59.

    DAWSON

    William Levi (D Ill.) April 26, 1886-Nov. 9, 1970; House 1943-Nov. 9, 1970.

    DEANE

    Charles Bennett (D N.C.) Nov. 1, 1898-Nov. 24, 1969; House 1947-57.

    DECKARD

    H. Joel (R Ind.) March 7, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    DeCONCINI

    Dennis (D Ariz.) May 8, 1937-—; Senate 1977-—.

    deGRAFFENRIED

    Edward (D Ala.) June 30, 1899-Nov. 5, 1974; House 1949-53.

    DE LACY

    Emerson Hugh (D Wash.) May 9, 1910-—; House 1945-47.

    DE LA GARZA II

    Eligio (D Texas) Sept. 22, 1927-—; House 1965-—.

    DELANEY

    James Joseph (D N.Y.) March 19, 1901-—; House 1945-47, 1949-Dec. 31, 1978.

    DELANEY

    John Joseph (D N.Y.) Aug. 21, 1878-Nov. 18, 1948; House March 5, 1918-19, 1931-Nov. 18, 1948.

    DELLAY

    Vincent John (D N.J.) June 23, 1907-—; House 1957-59 (1957 Republican, 1958-59 Democrat).

    DELLENBACK

    John Richard (R Ore.) Nov. 6, 1918-—; House 1967-75.

    DELLUMS

    Ronald V. (D Calif.) Nov. 24, 1935-—; House 1971-—.

    DE LUGO

    Ron (D V.I.) Aug. 2, 1930-—; House (Terr. Del.) 1973-—.

    DEMPSEY

    John Joseph (D N.M.) June 22, 1879-March 11, 1958; House 1935-41, 1951-March 11, 1958; Gov. 1943-47.

    DeNARDIS

    Lawrence J. (R Conn.) March 18, 1938-—; House 1981-—.

    DENHOLM

    Frank E. (D S.D.) Nov. 29, 1923-—; House 1971-75.

    DENNEY

    Robert Vernon (R Neb.) April 11, 1916-—; House 1967-71.

    DENNIS

    David Worth (R Ind.) June 7, 1912-—; House 1969-75.

    DENNISON

    David Short (R Ohio) July 29, 1918-—; House 1957-59.

    DENNY

    Harmar Denny Jr. (great-grandson of Harmar Denny) (R Pa.) July 2, 1886-Jan. 6, 1966; House 1951-53.

    DENT

    John Herman (D Pa.) March 10, 1908-—; House Jan. 21, 1958-79.

    DENTON

    Jeremiah (R Ala.) July 15, 1924-—; Senate 1981-—.

    DENTON

    Winfield Kirkpatrick (son of George Kirkpatrick Denton) (D Ind.) Oct. 28, 1896-Nov. 2, 1971; House 1949-53, 1955-Dec. 30, 1966.

    DEROUNIAN

    Steven Boghos (R N.Y.) April 6, 1918-—; House 1953-65.

    DERRICK

    Butler Carson Jr. (D S.C.) Sept. 30, 1936-—; House 1975-—.

    DERWINSKI

    Edward Joseph (R Ill.) Sept. 15, 1926-—; House 1959-—.

    DEVEREUX

    James Patrick Sinnott (R Md.) Feb. 20, 1903-—; House 1951-59.

    DEVINE

    Samuel Leeper (R Ohio) Dec. 21, 1915-—; House 1959-81.

    DEVITT

    Edward James (R Minn.) May 5, 1911-—; House 1947-49.

    D'EWART

    Wesley Abner (R Mont.) Oct. 1, 1889-Sept. 2, 1973; House June 5, 1945-55.

    DICKINSON

    William Louis (R Ala.) June 5, 1925-—; House 1965-—.

    DICKS

    Norman Devalois (D Wash.) Dec. 16, 1940-—; House 1977-—.

    DICKSTEIN

    Samuel (D N.Y.) Feb. 5, 1885-April 22, 1954; House 1923-Dec. 30, 1945.

    DIES

    Martin Jr. (son of Martin Dies) (D Texas) Nov. 5, 1900-Nov. 14, 1972; House 1931-45, 1953-59.

    DIGGS

    Charles Coles Jr. (D Mich.) Dec. 2, 1922-—; House 1955-June 3, 1980.

    DINGELL

    John David (father of John David Dingell Jr.) (D Mich.) Feb. 2, 1894-Sept. 19, 1955; House 1933-Sept. 19, 1955.

    DINGELL

    John David Jr. (son of John David Dingell) (D Mich.) July 8, 1926-—; House Dec. 13, 1955-—.

    DIRKSEN

    Everett McKinley (R Ill.) Jan. 4, 1896-Sept. 7, 1969; House 1933-49; Senate 1951-Sept. 7, 1969.

    DIXON

    Alan J. (D Ill.) July 7, 1927-—; Senate 1981-—.

    DIXON

    Henry Aldous (R Utah) June 29, 1890-Jan. 22, 1967; House 1955-61.

    DIXON

    Julian Carey (D Calif.) Aug. 8, 1934-—; House 1979-—.

    DODD

    Christopher John (son of Thomas Joseph Dodd) (D Conn.) May 27, 1944-—; House 1975-81; Senate 1981-—.

    DODD

    Thomas Joseph (father of Christopher John Dodd) (D Conn.) May 15, 1907-May 24, 1971; House 1953-57; Senate 1959-71.

    DOLE

    Robert J. (R Kan.) July 22, 1923-—; House 1961-69; Senate 1969-—; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1971-73.

    DOLLINGER

    Isidore (D N.Y.) Nov. 13, 1903-—; House 1949-Dec. 31, 1959.

    DOLLIVER

    James Isaac (nephew of Jonathan Prentiss Dolliver) R Iowa) Aug. 31, 1894-Dec. 10, 1978; House 1945-57.

    DOMENGEAUX

    James (D La.) Jan. 6, 1907-—; House 1941-April 15, 1944; Nov. 7, 1944-49.

    DOMENICI

    Pete Vichi (R N.M.) May 7, 1932-—; Senate 1973-—.

    DOMINICK

    Peter H. (nephew of Howard Alexander Smith) (R Colo.) July 7, 1915-March 18, 1981; House 1961-63; Senate 1963-75.

    DONDERO

    George Anthony (R Mich.) Dec. 16, 1883-Jan. 29, 1968; House 1933-57.

    DONNELL

    Forrest C. (R Mo.) Aug. 20, 1884-March 3, 1980; Senate 1945-51; Gov. 1941-45.

    DONNELLY

    Brian Joseph (D Mass.) March 2, 1947-—; House 1979-—.

    DONOHUE

    Harold Daniel (D Mass.) June 18, 1901-—; House 1947-Dec. 31, 1974.

    DONOVAN

    James George (D/R/L N.Y.) Dec. 15, 1898-—; House 1951-57.

    DOOLEY

    Edwin Benedict (R N.Y.) April 13, 1905-—; House 1957-63.

    DORGAN

    Byron L. (D N.D.) May 14, 1942-—; House 1981-—.

    DORN

    Francis Edwin (R N.Y.) April 18, 1911-—; House 1953-61.

    DORN

    William Jennings Bryan (D S.C.) April 14, 1916-—; House 1947-49; 1951-75.

    DORNAN

    Robert Kenneth (R Calif.) April 3, 1933-—; House 1977-—.

    DOUGHERTY

    Charles Francis (R Pa.) June 26, 1937-—; House 1979-—.

    DOUGHTON

    Robert Lee (D N.C.) Nov. 7, 1863-Oct. 1, 1954; House 1911-53.

    DOUGLAS

    Emily Taft (wife of Senator Paul H. Douglas) (D Ill.) April 10, 1899-—; House 1945-47.

    DOUGLAS

    Helen Gahagan (D Calif.) Nov. 25, 1900-—; House 1945-51.

    DOUGLAS

    Paul Howard (husband of Emily Taft Douglas) (D Ill.) March 26, 1892-Sept. 24, 1976; Senate 1949-67.

    DOW

    John Goodchild (D N.Y.) May 6, 1905-—; House 1965-69; 1971-73.

    DOWDY

    John Vernard (D Texas) Feb. 11, 1912-—; House Sept. 23, 1952-73.

    DOWNEY

    Sheridan (son of Stephen Wheeler Downey) (D Calif.) March 11, 1884-Oct. 25, 1961; Senate 1939-Nov. 30, 1950.

    DOWNEY

    Thomas Joseph (D N.Y.) Jan. 28, 1949-—; House 1975-—.

    DOWNING

    Thomas Nelms (D Va.) Feb. 1, 1919-—; House 1959-77.

    DOYLE

    Clyde Gilman (D Calif.) July 11, 1887-March 14, 1963; House 1945-47, 1949-March 14, 1963.

    DREIER

    David T. (R Calif.) July 5, 1952-—; House 1981-—.

    DREWRY

    Patrick Henry (D Va.) May 24, 1875-Dec. 21, 1947; House April 27, 1920-Dec. 21, 1947.

    DRINAN

    Robert Frederick (D Mass.) Nov. 15, 1920-—; House 1971-81.

    DUFF

    James Henderson (R Pa.) Jan. 21, 1883-Dec. 20, 1969; Senate Jan. 16, 1951-57; Gov. 1947-51.

    DULLES

    John Foster (R N.Y.) Feb. 25, 1888-May 24, 1959; Senate July 7-Nov. 8, 1949; Secy. of State 1953-59.

    DULSKI

    Thaddeus J. (D N.Y.) Sept. 27, 1915-—; House 1959-75.

    DUNCAN

    John J. (R Tenn.) March 24, 1919-—; House 1965-—.

    DUNCAN

    Robert Blackford (D Ore.) Dec. 4, 1920-—; House 1963-67, 1975-81.

    DUNN

    Jim (R Mich.) July 21, 1943-—; House 1981-—.

    du PONT

    Pierre S. (Pete) IV (R Del.) Jan. 22, 1935-—; House 1971-77; Gov. 1977-—.

    DURENBERGER

    David Ferdinand (R Minn.) Aug. 19, 1934-—; Senate Nov. 8, 1978-—.

    DURHAM

    Carl Thomas (D N.C.) Aug. 28, 1892-April 29, 1974; House 1939-61.

    DURKIN

    John Anthony (D N.H.) March 29, 1936-—; Senate Sept. 18, 1975-Dec. 28, 1980.

    DURNO

    Edwin R. (R Ore.) Jan. 26, 1899-Nov. 20, 1976; House 1961-63.

    DWORSHAK

    Henry Clarence (R Idaho) Aug. 29, 1894-July 23, 1962; House 1939-Nov. 5, 1946; Senate Nov. 6, 1946-49, Oct. 14, 1949-July 23, 1962.

    DWYER

    Bernard J. (D N.J.) Jan. 24, 1921-—; House 1981-—.

    DWYER

    Florence Price (R N.J.) July 4, 1902-Feb. 29, 1976; House 1959-73.

    DYAL

    Kenneth Warren (D Calif.) July 9, 1910-May 12, 1978; House 1965-67.

    DYMALLY

    Mervyn M. (D Calif.) May 12, 1926-—; House 1981-—.

    DYSON

    Roy (D Md.) Nov. 15, 1948-—; House 1981-—.

    E
    EAGLETON

    Thomas F. (D Mo.) Sept. 4, 1929-—; Senate Dec. 28, 1968-—.

    EARLY

    Joseph Daniel (D Mass.) Jan. 31, 1933-—; House 1975-—.

    EARTHMAN

    Harold Henderson (D Tenn.) April 13, 1900-—; House 1945-47.

    EAST

    John P. (R N.C.) May 5, 1931-—; Senate 1981-—.

    EASTLAND

    James Oliver (D Miss.) Nov. 28, 1904-—; Senate June 30-Sept. 18, 1941, 1943-Dec. 27, 1978; Pres. pro tempore July 29, 1972-Dec. 27, 1978.

    EATON

    Charles Aubrey (uncle of William Robb Eaton) (R N.J.) March 29, 1868-Jan. 23, 1953; House 1925-53.

    EBERHARTER

    Herman Peter (D Pa.) April 29, 1892-Sept. 9, 1958; House 1937-Sept. 9, 1958.

    ECKART

    Dennis E. (D Ohio) April 6, 1950-—; House 1981-—.

    ECKHARDT

    Robert Christian (cousin of Richard Mifflin Kleberg Sr., great-nephew of Rudolph Kleberg, nephew of Harry Mcleary Wurzbach) (D Texas) July 16, 1913-—; House 1967-81.

    ECTON

    Zales Nelson (R Mont.) April 1, 1898-March 3, 1961; Senate 1947-53.

    EDGAR

    Robert William (D Pa.) May 29, 1943-—; House 1975-—.

    EDMONDSON

    Edmond Augustus (brother of James Howard Edmondson) (D Okla.) April 7, 1919-—; House 1953-1973.

    EDMONDSON

    James Howard (brother of Edmond Augustus Edmondson) (D Okla.) Sept. 27, 1925-Nov. 17, 1971; Senate Jan. 9, 1963-Nov. 3, 1964, Gov. 1959-63.

    EDWARDS

    Don (D Calif.) Jan. 6, 1915-—; House 1963-—.

    EDWARDS

    Edwin Washington (husband of Elaine Schwartzenburg Edwards) (D La.) Aug. 7, 1927-—; House Oct. 2, 1965-May 9, 1972; Gov. May 9, 1972-—.

    EDWARDS

    Elaine Schwartzenburg (wife of Edwin Washington Edwards) (D La.) March 8, 1929-—; Senate Aug. 1, 1972-Nov. 13, 1972.

    EDWARDS

    Jack (William Jackson) (R Ala.) Sept. 20, 1928-—; House 1965-—.

    EDWARDS

    Marvin H. (R Okla.) July 12, 1937-—; House 1977-—.

    EILBERG

    Joshua (D Pa.) Feb. 12, 1921-—; House 1967-79.

    ELLENDER

    Allen Joseph (D La.) Sept. 24, 1890-July 27, 1972; Senate 1937-July 27, 1972. Pres. pro tempore 1971-July 27, 1972.

    ELLIOTT

    Alfred James (D Calif.) June 1, 1895-Jan. 17, 1973; House May 4, 1937-49.

    ELLIOTT

    Carl Atwood (D Ala.) Dec. 20, 1913-—; House 1949-65.

    ELLIOTT

    Douglas Hemphill (R Pa.) June 3, 1921-June 19, 1960; House April 26-June 19, 1960.

    ELLIS

    Hubert Summers (R W.Va.) July 6, 1887-Dec. 3, 1959; House 1943-49.

    ELLSWORTH

    Matthew Harris (R Ore.) Sept. 17, 1899-—; House 1943-57.

    ELLSWORTH

    Robert Fred (R Kan.) June 11, 1926-—; House 1961-67.

    ELSAESSER

    Edward Julius (R N.Y.) March 10, 1904-—; House 1945-49.

    ELSTON

    Charles Henry (R Ohio) Aug. 1, 1891-Sept. 25, 1980; House 1939-53.

    EMERSON

    William (R Mo.) Jan. 1, 1938-—; House 1981-—.

    EMERY

    David Farnham (R Maine) Sept. 1, 1948-—; House 1975-—.

    ENGEL

    Albert Joseph (R Mich.) Jan. 1, 1888-Dec. 2, 1959; House 1935-51.

    ENGLE

    Clair (D Calif.) Sept. 21, 1911-July 30, 1964; House Aug. 31, 1943-59; Senate 1959-July 30, 1964.

    ENGLISH

    Glenn Lee Jr. (D Okla.) Nov. 30, 1940-—; House 1975-—.

    ERDAHL

    Arlen Ingolf (R Minn.) Feb 27, 1931-—; House 1979-—.

    ERLENBORN

    John Neal (R Ill.) Feb. 8, 1927-—; House 1965-—.

    ERTEL

    Allen Edward (D Pa.) Nov. 7, 1936-—; House 1977-—.

    ERVIN

    Joseph Wilson (brother of Samuel James Ervin Jr.) (D N.C.) March 3, 1901-Dec. 25, 1945; House Jan. 3-Dec. 25, 1945.

    ERVIN

    Samuel James Jr. (brother of Joseph Wilson Ervin) (D N.C.) Sept. 27, 1896-—; House Jan. 22, 1946-47; Senate June 5, 1954-Dec. 31, 1974.

    ESCH

    Marvin L. (R Mich.) Aug. 4, 1927-—; House 1967-77.

    ESHLEMAN

    Edwin D. (R Pa.) Dec. 4, 1920-—; House 1967-77.

    EVANS

    Billy Lee (D Ga.) Nov. 10, 1941-—; House 1977-—.

    EVANS

    Cooper (R Iowa) May 26, 1924-—; House 1981-—.

    EVANS

    David Walter (D Ind.) Aug. 17, 1946-—; House 1975-—.

    EVANS

    Frank Edward (D Colo.) Sept. 6, 1923-—; House 1965-79.

    EVANS

    Thomas Beverley Jr. (R Del.) Nov. 5, 1931-—; House 1977-—; Co-Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1971-73.

    EVERETT

    Robert Ashton (D Tenn.) Feb. 24, 1915-Jan. 26, 1969; House Feb. 1, 1958-Jan. 26, 1969.

    EVINS

    Joseph Landon (Joe) (D Tenn.) Oct. 24, 1910-—; House 1947-77.

    EXON

    John James (D Neb.) Aug. 9, 1921-—; Senate 1979-—; Gov. 1971-79.

    F
    FALLON

    George Hyde (D Md.) July 24, 1902-March 21, 1980; House 1945-71.

    FANNIN

    Paul Jones (R Ariz.) Jan. 29, 1907-—; Senate 1965-77; Gov. 1959-65.

    FARBSTEIN

    Leonard (D N.Y.) Oct. 12, 1902-—; House 1957-71.

    FARNSLEY

    Charles Rowland Peaslee (D Ky.) March 28, 1907-—; House 1965-67.

    FARNUM

    Billie Sunday (D Mich.) April 11, 1916-Nov. 18, 1979; House 1965-67.

    FARRINGTON

    Joseph Rider (husband of Mary Elizabeth Pruett Farrington) (R Hawaii) Oct. 15, 1897-June 19, 1954; House (Terr. Del.) 1943-June 19, 1954.

    FARRINGTON

    Mary Elizabeth Pruett (widow of Joseph Rider Farrington) (R Hawaii) May 30, 1898-—; House (Terr. Del.) July 31, 1954-57.

    FARY

    John George (D Ill.) April 11, 1911-—; House July 8, 1975-—.

    FASCELL

    Dante Bruno (D Fla.) March 9, 1917-—; House 1955-—.

    FAUNTROY

    Walter Edward (D D.C.) Feb. 6, 1933-—; House (Delegate) March 23, 1971-—.

    FAZIO

    Victor Herbert (D Calif.) Oct. 11, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    FEAZEL

    William Crosson (D La.) June 10, 1895-March 16, 1965; Senate May 18-Dec. 30, 1948.

    FEIGHAN

    Michael Aloysius (D Ohio) Feb. 16, 1905-—; House 1943-71.

    FELLOWS

    Frank (R Maine) Nov. 7, 1889-Aug. 27, 1951; House 1941-Aug. 27, 1951.

    FENTON

    Ivor David (R Pa.) Aug. 3, 1889-—; House 1939-63.

    FENWICK

    Millicent Hammond (R N.J.) Feb. 25, 1910-—; House 1975-—.

    FERGUSON

    Homer (R Mich.) Feb. 25, 1889-—; Senate 1943-55.

    FERNANDEZ

    Antonio Manuel (D N.M.) Jan. 17, 1902-Nov. 7, 1956; House 1943-Nov. 7, 1956.

    FERNOS-ISERN

    Antonio (PD P.R.) May 10, 1895-Jan. 19, 1974; House (Res. Comm.) Sept. 11, 1946-65.

    FERRARO

    Geraldine (D N.Y.) Aug. 26, 1935-—; House 1979-—.

    FIEDLER

    Bobbi (R Calif.) April 22, 1937-—; House 1981-—.

    FIELDS

    Jack (R Texas) Feb. 3, 1952-—; House 1981-—.

    FINDLEY

    Paul (R Ill.) June 23, 1921-—; House 1961-—.

    FINE

    Sidney Asher (D N.Y.) Sept. 14, 1903-—; House 1951-Jan. 2, 1956.

    FINNEGAN

    Edward Rowan (D Ill.) June 5, 1905-Feb. 2, 1971; House 1961-Dec. 6, 1964.

    FINO

    Paul Albert (R N.Y.) Dec. 15, 1913-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1968.

    FISH

    Hamilton Jr. (son of Hamilton Fish Jr. born in 1888, grandson of Hamilton Fish born in 1849, great-grandson of Hamilton Fish born in 1808) (R N.Y.) June 3, 1926-—; House 1969-—.

    FISHER

    Joseph Lyman (D Va.) Jan. 11, 1914-—; House 1975-81.

    FISHER

    Ovie Clark (D Texas) Nov. 22, 1903-—; House 1943-75.

    FITHIAN

    Floyd James (D Ind.) Nov. 3, 1928-—; House 1975-—.

    FJARE

    Orvin Benonie (R Mont.) April 16, 1918-—; House 1955-57.

    FLANDERS

    Ralph Edward (R Vt.) Sept. 28, 1880-Feb. 19, 1970; Senate Nov. 1, 1946-59.

    FLANNAGAN

    John William Jr. (D Va.) Feb. 20, 1885-April 27, 1955; House 1931-49.

    FLETCHER

    Charles Kimball (R Calif.) Dec. 15, 1902-—; House 1947-49.

    FLIPPO

    Ronnie G. (D Ala.) Aug. 15, 1937-—; House 1977-—.

    FLOOD

    Daniel John (D Pa.) Nov. 26, 1903-—; House 1945-47, 1949-53, 1955-Jan. 31, 1980.

    FLORIO

    James Joseph (D N.J.) Aug. 29, 1937-—; House 1975-—.

    FLOWERS

    Walter (D Ala.) April 12, 1933-—; House 1969-79.

    FLYNN

    Gerald Thomas (D Wis.) Oct. 7, 1910-—; House 1959-61.

    FLYNT

    John James Jr. (D Ga.) Nov. 8, 1914-—; House Nov. 2, 1954-79.

    FOGARTY

    John Edward (D R.I.) March 23, 1913-Jan. 10, 1967; House 1941-Dec. 7, 1944; 1945-Jan. 10, 1967.

    FOGLIETTA

    Thomas M. (Ind. Pa.) Dec. 3, 1928-—; House 1981-—.

    FOLEY

    John Robert (D Md.) Oct. 16, 1917-—; House 1959-61.

    FOLEY

    Thomas Stephen (D Wash.) March 6, 1929-—; House 1965-—.

    FOLGER

    John Hamlin (brother of Alonzo Dillard Folger) (D N.C.) Dec. 18, 1880-July 19, 1963; House June 14, 1941-49.

    FONG

    Hiram Leong (R Hawaii) Oct. 1, 1907-—; Senate Aug. 21, 1959-77.

    FOOTE

    Ellsworth Bishop (R Conn.) Jan. 12, 1898-Jan. 18, 1977; House 1947-49.

    FORAND

    Aime Joseph (D R.I.) May 23, 1895-Jan. 18, 1972; House 1937-39, 1941-61.

    FORD

    Gerald R. Jr. (R Mich.) July 14, 1913-—; House 1949-Dec. 6, 1973; Vice Pres. Dec. 6, 1973-Aug. 9, 1974; President Aug. 9, 1974-77.

    FORD

    Harold Eugene (D Tenn.) May 20, 1945-—; House 1975-—.

    FORD

    Wendell Hampton (D Ky.) Sept. 8, 1924-—; Senate Dec. 28, 1974-—; Gov. 1971-74.

    FORD

    William David (D Mich.) Aug. 6, 1927-—; House 1965-—.

    FOREMAN

    Edgar Franklin (R Texas/N.M.) Dec. 22, 1933-—; House 1963-65 (Texas), 1969-71 (N.M.).

    FORRESTER

    Elijah Lewis (D Ga.) Aug. 16, 1896-March 19, 1970; House 1951-65.

    FORSYTHE

    Edwin Bell (R N.J.) Jan. 17, 1916-—; House Nov. 3, 1970-—.

    FOUNTAIN

    Lawrence H. (D N.C.) April 23, 1913-—; House 1953-—.

    FOWLER

    William Wyche Jr. (D Ga.) Oct. 6, 1940-—; House April 6, 1977-—.

    FRANK

    Barney (D Mass.) March 31, 1940-—; House 1981-—.

    FRASER

    Donald MacKay (D Minn.) Feb. 20, 1924-—; House 1963-79.

    FRAZIER

    James Beriah Jr. (D Tenn.) June 23, 1890-Oct. 30, 1978; House 1949-63.

    FREAR

    Joseph Allen Jr. (D Del.) March 7, 1903-—; Senate 1949-61.

    FRELINGHUYSEN

    Peter Hood Ballantine Jr. (cousin of Joseph Sherman Frelinghuysen, great-grandson of Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen, great-great-great-nephew of Theodore Frelinghuysen, great-great-great-grandson of Frederick Frelinghuysen) (R N.J.) Jan. 17, 1916-—; House 1953-75.

    FRENZEL

    William E. (R Minn.) July 31, 1928-—; House 1971-—.

    FREY

    Louis Jr. (R Fla.) Jan. 11, 1934-—; House 1969-79.

    FRIEDEL

    Samuel Nathaniel (D Md.) April 18, 1898-March 21, 1979; House 1953-71.

    FROEHLICH

    Harold Vernon (R Wis.) May 12, 1932-—; House 1973-75.

    FROST

    Jonas Martin III (D Texas) Jan. 1, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    FUGATE

    Thomas Bacon (D Va.) April 10, 1899-Sept. 22, 1980; House 1949-53.

    FULBRIGHT

    James William (D Ark.) April 9, 1905-—; House 1943-45; Senate 1945-Dec. 31, 1974.

    FULLER

    Hawden Carlton (R N.Y.) Aug. 28, 1895-—; House Nov. 2, 1943-49.

    FULTON

    James Grove (R Pa.) March 1, 1903-Oct. 6, 1971; House Feb. 2, 1945-Oct. 6, 1971.

    FULTON

    Richard Harmon (D Tenn.) Jan. 27, 1927-—; House 1963-Aug. 14, 1975.

    FUQUA

    Don (D Fla.) Aug. 20, 1933-—; House 1963-—.

    FURCOLO

    Foster (D Mass.) July 29, 1911-—; House 1949-Sept. 30, 1952; Gov. 1957-61.

    G
    GALIFIANAKIS

    Nick (D N.C.) July 22, 1928-—; House 1967-73.

    GALLAGHER

    Cornelius Edward (D N.J.) March 2, 1921-—; House 1959-73.

    GALLAGHER

    James A. (R Pa.) Jan. 16, 1869-Dec. 8, 1957; House 1943-45, 1947-49.

    GALLAGHER

    William James (D Minn.) May 13, 1875-Aug. 13, 1946; House 1945-Aug. 13, 1946.

    GAMBLE

    Ralph Abernethy (son of Robert Jackson Gamble, nephew of John Rankin Gamble) (R N.Y.) May 6, 1885-March 4, 1959; House Nov. 2, 1937-57.

    GAMBRELL

    David Henry (D Ga.) Dec. 20, 1929-—; Senate Feb. 1, 1971-Nov. 7, 1972.

    GAMMAGE

    Robert Alton (D Texas) March 13, 1938-—; House 1977-79.

    GARCIA

    Robert (D N.Y.) Jan. 9, 1933-—; House Feb. 21, 1978-—.

    GARDNER

    Edward Joseph (D Ohio) Aug. 7, 1898-Dec. 7, 1950; House 1945-47.

    GARDNER

    James Carson (R N.C.) April 8, 1933-—; House 1967-69.

    GARLAND

    Peter Adams (R Maine) June 16, 1923-—; House 1961-63.

    GARMATZ

    Edward Alexander (D Md.) Feb. 7, 1903-—; House July 15, 1947-1973.

    GARN

    Edwin Jacob (R Utah) Oct. 12, 1932-—; Senate Dec. 21, 1974-—.

    GARY

    Julian Vaughan (D Va.) Feb. 25, 1892-Sept. 6, 1973; House March 6, 1945-65.

    GATHINGS

    Ezekiel Candler (D Ark.) Nov. 10, 1903-May 2, 1979; House 1939-69.

    GAVIN

    Leon Harry (R Pa.) Feb. 25, 1893-Sept. 15, 1963; House 1943-Sept. 15, 1963.

    GAYDOS

    Joseph M. (D Pa.) July 3, 1926-—; House Nov. 5, 1968-—.

    GEARHART

    Bertrand Wesley (R Calif.) May 31, 1890-Oct. 11, 1955; House 1935-49.

    GEELAN

    James Patrick (D Conn.) Aug. 11, 1901-—; House 1945-47.

    GEJDENSON

    Samuel (D Conn.) May 20, 1948-—; House 1981-—.

    GENTRY

    Brady Preston (D Texas) March 25, 1896-Nov. 9, 1966; House 1953-57.

    GEORGE

    Myron Virgil (R Kan.) Jan. 6, 1900-April 11, 1972; House Nov. 7, 1950-59.

    GEORGE

    Newell A. (D Kan.) Sept. 24, 1904-—; House 1959-61.

    GEORGE

    Walter Franklin (D Ga.) Jan. 29, 1878-Aug. 4, 1957; Senate Nov. 22, 1922-57; Pres. pro tempore 1955-57.

    GEPHARDT

    Richard Andrew (D Mo.) Jan. 31, 1941-—; House 1977-—.

    GERLACH

    Charles Lewis (R Pa.) Sept. 14, 1895-May 5, 1947; House 1939-May 5, 1947.

    GERRY

    Peter Goelet (great-grandson of Elbridge Gerry) (D R.I.) Sept. 18, 1879-Oct. 31, 1957; House 1913-15; Senate 1917-29; 1935-47.

    GETTYS

    Thomas Smithwick (D S.C.) June 19, 1912-—; House Nov. 3, 1964-Dec. 31, 1974.

    GIAIMO

    Robert Nicholas (D Conn.) Oct. 15, 1919-—; House 1959-81.

    GIBBONS

    Sam M. (D Fla.) Jan. 20, 1920-—; House 1963-—.

    GIBSON

    John Strickland (D Ga.) Jan. 3, 1893-Oct. 19, 1960; House 1941-47.

    GIFFORD

    Charles Laceille (R Mass.) March 15, 1871-Aug. 23, 1947; House Nov. 7, 1922-Aug. 23, 1947.

    GILBERT

    Jacob H. (D N.Y.) June 17, 1920-—; House March 8, 1960-1971.

    GILL

    Thomas P. (D Hawaii) April 21, 1922-—; House 1963-65.

    GILLESPIE

    Dean Milton (R Colo.) May 3, 1884-Feb. 2, 1949; House March 7, 1944-47.

    GILLETTE

    Guy Mark (D Iowa) Feb. 3, 1879-March 3, 1973; House 1933-Nov. 3, 1936; Senate Nov. 4, 1936-45, 1949-55.

    GILLETTE

    Wilson Darwin (R Pa.) July 1, 1880-Aug. 7, 1951; House Nov. 4, 1941-Aug. 7, 1951.

    GILLIE

    George W. (R Ind.) Aug. 15, 1880-July 3, 1963; House 1939-49.

    GILLIGAN

    John J. (D Ohio) March 22, 1921-—; House 1965-67; Gov. 1971-75.

    GILMAN

    Benjamin Arthur (R N.Y.) Dec. 6, 1922-—; House 1973-—.

    GILMER

    William Franklin (Dixie) (D Okla.) June 7, 1901-June 9, 1954; House 1949-51.

    GINGRICH

    Newton Leroy (R Ga.) June 17, 1943-—; House 1979-—.

    GINN

    Ronald Bryan (D Ga.) May 31, 1934-—; House 1973-—.

    GLASS

    Carter (D Va.) Jan. 4, 1858-May 28, 1946; House Nov. 4, 1902-Dec. 16, 1918; Senate Feb. 2, 1920-May 28, 1946; Secy. of the Treasury 1918-20.

    GLENN

    John Herschel Jr. (D Ohio) July 18, 1921-—; Senate Dec. 24, 1974-—.

    GLENN

    Milton Willits (R N.J.) June 18, 1903-Dec. 14, 1967; House Nov. 5, 1957-65.

    GLICKMAN

    Daniel Robert (D Kan.) Nov. 24, 1944-—; House 1977-—.

    GOFF

    Abe McGregor (R Idaho) Dec. 21, 1899-—; House 1947-49.

    GOLDEN

    James Stephen (R Ky.) Sept. 10, 1891-Sept. 6, 1971; House 1949-55.

    GOLDWATER

    Barry Morris (father of Barry Morris Goldwater Jr.) (R Ariz.) Jan. 1, 1909-—; Senate 1953-65, 1969-—.

    GOLDWATER

    Barry Morris Jr. (son of Barry Morris Goldwater) (R Calif.) July 15, 1938-—; House April 29, 1969-—.

    GONZALEZ

    Henry B. (D Texas) May 3, 1916-—; House Nov. 4, 1961-—.

    GOODELL

    Charles Ellsworth (R N.Y.) March 16, 1926-—; House May 26, 1959-Sept. 10, 1968; Senate Sept. 10, 1968-71.

    GOODLING

    George Atlee (father of William Franklin Goodling) (R Pa.) Sept. 26, 1896-—; House 1961-65, 1967-75.

    GOODLING

    William Franklin (son of George Atlee Goodling) (R Pa.) Dec. 5, 1927-—; House 1975-—.

    GOODWIN

    Angier Louis (R Mass.) Jan. 30, 1881-June 20, 1975; House 1943-55.

    GORDON

    Thomas Sylvy (D Ill.) Dec. 17, 1893-Jan. 22, 1959; House 1943-59.

    GORE

    Albert Arnold (father of Albert Arnold Gore Jr.) (D Tenn.) Dec. 26, 1907-—; House 1939-Dec. 4, 1944, 1945-53; Senate 1953-71.

    GORE

    Albert Arnold Jr. (son of Albert Arnold Gore) (D Tenn.) March 31, 1948-—; House 1977-—.

    GORSKI

    Chester Charles (D N.Y.) June 22, 1906-April 25, 1975; House 1949-51.

    GORSKI

    Martin (D Ill.) Oct. 30, 1886-Dec. 4, 1949; House 1943-Dec. 4, 1949.

    GORTON

    Slade (R Wash.) Jan. 8, 1928-—; Senate 1981-—.

    GOSSETT

    Charles Clinton (D Idaho) Sept. 2, 1888-Sept. 20, 1974; Senate Nov. 17, 1945-47; Gov. Jan.-Nov. 16, 1945.

    GOSSETT

    Ed Lee (D Texas) Jan. 27, 1902-—; House 1939-July 31, 1951.

    GRABOWSKI

    Bernard F. (D Conn.) June 11, 1923-—; House 1963-67.

    GRADISON

    Willis David Jr. (R Ohio) Dec. 28, 1928-—; House 1975-—.

    GRAHAM

    Frank Porter (D N.C.) Oct. 14, 1886-Feb. 16, 1972: Senate March 29, 1949-Nov. 26, 1950.

    GRAHAM

    Louis Edward (R Pa.) Aug. 4, 1880-Nov. 9, 1965; House 1939-55.

    GRAMM

    William Philip (D Texas) July 8, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    GRANAHAN

    Kathryn Elizabeth (widow of William Thomas Granahan) (D Pa.) Dec. 7, 1906-July 10, 1979; House Nov. 6, 1956-63.

    GRANAHAN

    William Thomas (husband of Kathryn Elizabeth Granahan) (D Pa.) July 26, 1895-May 25, 1956; House 1945-47; 1949-May 25, 1956.

    GRANGER

    Walter Keil (D Utah) Oct. 11, 1888-April 21, 1978; House 1941-53.

    GRANT

    George McInvale (D Ala.) July 11, 1897-—; House June 14, 1938-65.

    GRANT

    Robert Allen (R Ind.) July 31, 1905-—; House 1939-49.

    GRASSLEY

    Charles Ernest (R Iowa) Sept. 17, 1933-—; House 1975-81; Senate 1981-—.

    GRASSO

    Ella T. (D Conn.) May 10, 1919-—; House 1971-1975; Gov. 1975-—.

    GRAVEL

    Maurice Robert (D Alaska) May 13 1930-—; Senate 1969-81.

    GRAY

    Kenneth James (D Ill.) Nov. 14, 1924-—; House 1955-Dec. 31, 1974.

    GRAY

    William H. III (D Pa.) Aug. 20, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    GREEN

    Edith (D Ore.) Jan. 17, 1910-—; House 1955-Dec. 31, 1974.

    GREEN

    Sedgwick William (R N.Y.) Oct. 16, 1929-—; House Feb. 21, 1978-—.

    GREEN

    Theodore Francis (grandnephew of Samuel Greene Arnold, great-grandnephew of Tristam Burges, great-grandson of James Burrill Jr., great-great-nephew of Lemuel Hastings Arnold) (D R.I.) Oct. 2, 1867-May 19, 1966; Senate 1937-61; Gov. 1933-37.

    GREEN

    William Joseph Jr. (father of William Joseph Green III) (D Pa.) March 5, 1910-Dec. 21, 1963; House 1945-47; 1949-Dec. 21, 1963.

    GREEN

    William Joseph III (son of William Joseph Green Jr.) (D Pa.) June 24, 1938-—; House April 28, 1964-77.

    GREENWOOD

    Ernest (D N.Y.) Nov. 25, 1884-June 15, 1955; House 1951-53.

    GREGG

    Judd (R N.H.) Feb. 14, 1947-—; House 1981-—.

    GREGORY

    Noble Jones (brother of William Voris Gregory) (D Ky.) Aug. 30, 1897-Sept. 26, 1971; House 1937-59.

    GREIGG

    Stanley Lloyd (D Iowa) May 7, 1931-—; House 1965-67.

    GRIDER

    George William (D Tenn.) Oct. 1, 1912-—; House 1965-67.

    GRIFFIN

    Charles Hudson (great-great-grandson of Isaac Griffin) (D Miss.) May 9, 1926-—; House March 12, 1968-1973.

    GRIFFIN

    Robert Paul (R Mich.) Nov. 6, 1923-—; House 1957-May 10, 1966; Senate May 11, 1966-79.

    GRIFFITHS

    Martha Wright (D Mich.) Jan. 29, 1912-—; House 1955-Dec. 31, 1974.

    GRIFFITHS

    Percy Wilfred (R Ohio) March 30, 1893-—; House 1943-49.

    GRISHAM

    Wayne Richard (R Calif.) Jan. 10, 1923-—; House 1979-—.

    GRISWOLD

    Dwight Palmer (R Neb.) Nov. 27, 1893-April 12, 1954; Senate Nov. 5, 1952-April 12, 1954; Gov. 1941-47.

    GROSS

    Chester Heilman (R Pa.) Oct. 13, 1888-Jan. 9, 1973; House 1939-41; 1943-49.

    GROSS

    Harold Royce (R Iowa) June 30, 1899-—; House 1949-1975.

    GROVER

    James R. Jr. (R N.Y.) March 5, 1919-—; House 1963-75.

    GRUENING

    Ernest (D Alaska) Feb. 6, 1887-June 26, 1974; Senate 1959-69; Gov. (Alaska Terr.) 1939-53.

    GUARINI

    Frank Joseph (D N.J.) Aug. 20, 1924-—; House 1979-—.

    GUBSER

    Charles Samuel (R Calif.) Feb. 1, 1916-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1974.

    GUDE

    Gilbert (R Md.) March 9, 1923-—; House 1967-77.

    GUDGER

    Lamar (D N.C.) April 30, 1919-—; House 1977-81.

    GUFFEY

    Joseph F. (D Pa.) Dec. 29, 1870-March 6, 1959; Senate 1935-47.

    GUILL

    Ben Hugh (R Texas) Sept. 8, 1909-—; House May 6, 1950-51.

    GUNDERSON

    Steven (R Wis.) May 10, 1951-—; House 1981-—.

    GUNTER

    William Dawson Jr. (D Fla.) July 16, 1934-—; House 1973-75.

    GURNEY

    Chan (John Chandler) (R S.D.) May 21, 1896-—; Senate 1939-51.

    GURNEY

    Edward John (R Fla.) Jan. 12, 1914-—; House 1963-69; Senate 1969-Dec. 31, 1974.

    GUYER

    Tennyson (R Ohio) Nov. 29, 1913-April 12, 1981; House 1973-April 12, 1981.

    GWINN

    Ralph Waldo (R N.Y.) March 29, 1884-Feb. 27, 1962; House 1945-59.

    GWYNNE

    John William (R Iowa) Oct. 20, 1889-—; House 1935-49.

    H
    HAGAN

    G. Elliott (D Ga.) May 24, 1916-—; House 1961-1973.

    HAGEDORN

    Thomas Michael (R Minn.) Nov. 27, 1943-—; House 1975-—.

    HAGEN

    Harlan Francis (D Calif.) Oct. 8, 1914-—; House 1953-67.

    HAGEN

    Harold Christian (R Minn.) Nov. 10, 1901-March 19, 1957; House 1943-55 (1943-45) Farmer Laborite, 1945-55 Republican).

    HALE

    Robert (cousin of Frederick Hale) (R Maine) Nov. 29, 1889-Nov. 30, 1976; House 1943-59.

    HALEY

    James Andrew (D Fla.) Jan. 4, 1899-—; House 1953-77.

    HALL

    David McKee (D N.C.) May 16, 1918-Jan. 29, 1960; House 1959-Jan. 29, 1960.

    HALL

    Durward Gorham (R Mo.) Sept. 14, 1910-—; House 1961-73.

    HALL

    Edwin Arthur (R N.Y.) Feb. 11, 1909-—; House Nov. 7, 1939-53.

    HALL

    Leonard Wood (R N.Y.) Oct. 2, 1900-June 2, 1979; House 1939-Dec. 31, 1952; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1953-57.

    HALL

    Ralph M. (D Texas) May 3, 1923-—; House 1981-—.

    HALL

    Sam Blakeley Jr. (D Texas) Jan. 11, 1924-—; House June 19, 1976-—.

    HALL

    Tim Lee (D Ill.) June 11, 1925-—; House 1975-77.

    HALLECK

    Charles Abraham (R Ind.) Aug. 22, 1900-—; House Jan. 29, 1935-69.

    HALPERN

    Seymour (R N.Y.) Nov. 19, 1913-—; House 1959-73.

    HAMILTON

    Lee Herbert (D Ind.) April 20, 1931-—; House 1965-—.

    HAMMERSCHMIDT

    John Paul (R Ark.) May 4, 1922-—; House 1967-—.

    HANCE

    Kent Ronald (D Texas) Nov. 14, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    HANCOCK

    Clarence Eugene (R N.Y.) Feb. 13, 1885-Jan. 3, 1948; House Nov. 8, 1927-47.

    HAND

    Thomas Millet (R N.J.) July 7, 1902-Dec. 26, 1956; House 1945-Dec. 26, 1956.

    HANLEY

    James M. (D N.Y.) July 19, 1920-—; House 1965-81.

    HANNA

    Richard Thomas (D Calif.) June 9, 1914-—; House 1963-Dec. 31, 1974.

    HANNAFORD

    Mark Warren (D Calif.) Feb. 7, 1925-—; House 1975-79.

    HANRAHAN

    Robert Paul (R Ill.) Feb. 25, 1934-—; House 1973-75.

    HANSEN

    Clifford Peter (R Wyo.) Oct. 16, 1912-—; Senate 1967-Dec. 31, 1978; Gov. 1963-67.

    HANSEN

    George Vernon (R Idaho) Sept. 14, 1930-—; House 1965-69, 1975-—.

    HANSEN

    James V. (R Utah) Aug. 14, 1932-—; House 1981-—.

    HANSEN

    John Robert (D Iowa) Aug. 24, 1901-Sept. 23, 1974; House 1965-67.

    HANSEN

    Julia Butler (D Wash.) June 14, 1907-—; House Nov. 8, 1960-Dec. 31, 1974.

    HANSEN

    Orval Howard (R Idaho) Aug. 3, 1926-—; House 1969-75.

    HARDEN

    Cecil Murray (R Ind.) Nov. 21, 1894-—; House 1949-59.

    HARDING

    Ralph R. (D Idaho) Sept. 9, 1929-—; House 1961-65.

    HARDY

    Porter Jr. (D Va.) June 1, 1903-—; House 1947-69.

    HARE

    Butler Black (father of James Butler Hare) (D S.C.) Nov. 25, 1875-Dec. 30, 1967; House 1925-33; 1939-47.

    HARE

    James Butler (son of Butler Black Hare) (D S.C.) Sept. 4, 1918-July 16, 1966; House 1949-51.

    HARGIS

    Denver David (D Kan.) July 22, 1921-—; House 1959-61.

    HARKIN

    Thomas Richard (D lowa) Nov. 19, 1939-—; House 1975-—.

    HARLESS

    Richard Fielding (D Ariz.) Aug. 6, 1905-Nov. 24, 1970; House 1943-49.

    HARMON

    Randall S. (D Ind.) July 19, 1903-—; House 1959-61.

    HARNESS

    Forest Arthur (R Ind.) June 24, 1895-July 29, 1974; House 1939-49.

    HARRINGTON

    Michael Joseph (D Mass.) Sept. 2, 1936-—; House Sept. 30, 1969-79.

    HARRIS

    Fred Roy (D Okla.) Nov. 13, 1930-—; Senate Nov. 4, 1964-Jan. 3, 1973; Chrmn. Dem. Nat. Comm. 1969-70.

    HARRIS

    Herbert Eugene II (D Va.) April 14, 1926-—; House 1975-81.

    HARRIS

    Oren (D Ark.) Dec. 20, 1903-—; House 1941-Feb. 2, 1966.

    HARRISON

    Burr Powell (son of Thomas Walter Harrison) (D Va.) July 2, 1904-Dec. 29, 1973; House Nov. 6, 1946-63.

    HARRISON

    Robert Dinsmore (R Neb.) Jan. 26, 1897-June 11, 1977; House Dec. 4, 1951-59.

    HARRISON

    William Henry (great-great-grandson of President William Henry Harrison, grandson of President Benjamin Harrison and Alvin Saunders) (R Wyo.) Aug. 10, 1896-—; House 1951-55; 1961-65, 1967-69.

    HARSHA

    William Howard (R Ohio) Jan. 1, 1921-—; House 1961-81.

    HART

    Edward Joseph (D N.J.) March 25, 1893-April 20, 1961; House 1935-55.

    HART

    Gary Warren (D Colo.) Nov. 28, 1937-—; Senate 1975-—.

    HART

    Philip Aloysius (D Mich.) Dec. 10, 1912-Dec. 26, 1976; Senate 1959-Dec. 26, 1976.

    HART

    Thomas Charles (R Conn.) June 12, 1877-July 4, 1971; Senate Feb. 15, 1945-Nov. 5, 1946.

    HARTKE

    Rupert Vance (D Ind.) May 31, 1919-—; Senate 1959-77.

    HARTLEY

    Fred Allan Jr. (R N.J.) Feb. 22, 1902-May 11, 1969; House 1929-49.

    HARTNETT

    Thomas F. (R S.C.) Aug. 7, 1941-—; House 1981-—.

    HARVEY

    James (R Mich.) July 4, 1922-—; House 1961-Jan. 31, 1974.

    HARVEY

    Ralph (R Ind.) Aug. 9, 1901-—; House Nov. 4, 1947-59; 1961-Dec. 30, 1966.

    HASKELL

    Floyd Kirk (D Colo.) Feb. 7, 1916-—; Senate 1973-79.

    HASKELL

    Harry Garner Jr. (R Del.) May 27, 1921-—; House 1957-59.

    HASTINGS

    James Fred (R N.Y.) April 10, 1926-—; House 1969-Jan. 20, 1976.

    HATCH

    Carl Atwood (D N.M.) Nov. 27, 1889-Sept. 14, 1963; Senate Oct. 10, 1933-49.

    HATCH

    Orrin Grant (R Utah) March 22, 1934-—; Senate 1977-—.

    HATCHER

    Charles F. (D Ga.) July 1, 1939-—; House 1981-—.

    HATFIELD

    Mark Odom (R Ore.) July 12, 1922-—; Senate Jan. 10, 1967-—; Gov. 1959-67.

    HATHAWAY

    William Dodd (D Maine) Feb. 21, 1924-—; House 1965-1973; Senate 1973-79.

    HAVENNER

    Franck Roberts (D Calif.) Sept. 20, 1882-July 24, 1967; House 1937-41, 1945-53 (1937-39 Progressive, 1939-41, 1945-53 Democrat).

    HAWKES

    Albert Wahl (R N.J.) Nov. 20, 1878-May 9, 1971; Senate 1943-49.

    HAWKINS

    Augustus F. (D Calif.) Aug. 31, 1907-—; House 1963-—.

    HAWKINS

    Paula (R Fla.) Jan. 24, 1927-—; Senate 1981-—.

    HAYAKAWA

    Samuel Ichiye (R Calif.) July 18, 1906-—; Senate Jan. 2, 1977-—.

    HAYDEN

    Carl Trumbull (D Ariz.) Oct. 2, 1877-Jan. 25, 1972; House Feb. 19, 1912-27; Senate 1927-69; Pres. pro tempore 1957-69.

    HAYES

    Philip Harold (D Ind.) Sept. 1, 1940-—; House 1975-77.

    HAYS

    Lawrence Brooks (D Ark.) Aug. 9, 1898-—; House 1943-59.

    HAYS

    Wayne Levere (D Ohio) May 13, 1911-—; House 1949-Sept. 1, 1976.

    HAYWORTH

    Donald (D Mich.) Jan. 13, 1898-—; House 1955-57.

    HEALEY

    James Christopher (D N.Y.) Dec. 24, 1909-—; House Feb. 7, 1956-65.

    HEALY

    Ned R. (D Calif.) Aug. 9, 1905-Sept. 10, 1977; House 1945-47.

    HEBERT

    Felix Edward (D La.) Oct. 12, 1901-Dec. 29, 1979; House 1941-77.

    HECHLER

    Ken (D W.Va.) Sept. 20, 1914-—; House 1959-77.

    HECKLER

    Margaret M. (R Mass.) June 21, 1931-—; House 1967-—.

    HEDRICK

    Erland Harold (D W.Va.) Aug. 9, 1894-Sept. 20, 1954; House 1945-53.

    HEFFERNAN

    James Joseph (D N.Y.) Nov. 8, 1888-Jan. 27, 1967; House 1941-53.

    HEFLIN

    Howell Thomas (D Ala.) June 19, 1921-—; Senate 1979-—.

    HEFNER

    Willie Gathrel (D N.C.) April 11, 1930-—; House 1975-—.

    HEFTEL

    Cecil (D Hawaii) Sept. 30, 1924-—; House 1977-—.

    HEIDINGER

    James Vandaveer (R Ill.) July 17, 1882-March 22, 1945; House 1941-March 22, 1945.

    HEINZ

    Henry John III (R Pa.) Oct. 23, 1938-—; House Nov. 2, 1971-77; Senate 1977-—.

    HELLER

    Louis Benjamin (D N.Y.) Feb. 10, 1905-—; House Feb. 15, 1949-July 21, 1954.

    HELMS

    Jesse Alexander (R N.C.) Oct. 18, 1921-—; Senate 1973-—.

    HELSTOSKI

    Henry (D N.J.) March 21, 1925-—; House 1965-77.

    HEMPHILL

    Robert Witherspoon (great-great nephew of John Hemphill, great-nephew of John James Hemphill and William Huggins Brawley, great-great-grandson of Robert Witherspoon) (D S.C.) May 10, 1915-—; House 1957-May 1, 1964.

    HENDERSON

    David Newton (D N.C.) April 16, 1921-—; House 1961-77.

    HENDERSON

    John Earl (R Ohio) Jan. 4, 1917-—; House 1955-61.

    HENDON

    William M. (R N.C.) Nov. 9, 1944-—; House 1981-—.

    HENDRICKS

    Joseph Edward (D Fla.) Sept. 24, 1903-—; House 1937-49.

    HENDRICKSON

    Robert Clymer (R N.J.) Aug. 12, 1898-Dec. 7, 1964; Senate 1949-55.

    HENNINGS

    Thomas Carey Jr. (D Mo.) June 25, 1903-Sept. 13, 1960; House 1935-Dec. 31, 1940; Senate 1951-Sept. 13, 1960.

    HENRY

    Robert Kirkland (R Wis.) Feb. 9, 1890-Nov. 20, 1946; House 1945-Nov. 20, 1946.

    HERLONG

    Albert Sydney Jr. (D Fla.) Feb. 14, 1909-—; House 1949-69.

    HERTEL

    Dennis M. (D Mich.) Dec. 7, 1938-—; House 1981-—.

    HERTER

    Christian Archibald (R Mass.) March 28, 1895-Dec. 30, 1966; House 1943-53; Secy. of State 1959-61; Gov. 1953-57.

    HESELTON

    John Walter (R Mass.) March 17, 1900-Aug. 19, 1962; House 1945-59.

    HESS

    William Emil (R Ohio) Feb. 13, 1898-—; House 1929-37, 1939-49, 1951-61.

    HICKENLOOPER

    Bourke Blakemore (R Iowa) July 21, 1896-Sept. 4, 1971; Senate 1945-69; Gov. 1943-45.

    HICKEY

    John Joseph (D Wyo.) Aug. 22, 1911-Sept. 22, 1970; Senate 1961-Nov. 6, 1962; Gov. 1959-61.

    HICKS

    Floyd Verne (D Wash.) May 29, 1915-—; House 1965-77.

    HICKS

    Louise Day (D Mass.) Oct. 16, 1923-—; House 1971-73.

    HIESTAND

    Edgar Willard (R Calif.) Dec. 3, 1888-Aug. 19, 1970; House 1953-63.

    HIGHTOWER

    Jack English (D Texas) Sept. 6, 1926-—; House 1975-—.

    HILER

    John P. (R Ind.) April 24, 1953-—; House 1981-—.

    HILL

    Joseph Lister (D Ala.) Dec. 29, 1894-—; House Aug. 14, 1923-Jan. 11, 1938; Senate Jan. 11, 1938-69.

    HILL

    William Silas (R Colo.) Jan. 20, 1886-Aug. 28, 1972; House 1941-59.

    HILLELSON

    Jeffrey Paul (R Mo.) March 9, 1919-—; House 1953-55.

    HILLINGS

    Patrick Jerome (R Calif.) Feb. 19, 1923-—; House 1951-59.

    HILLIS

    Elwood Haynes (R Ind.) March 6, 1926-—; House 1971-—.

    HINSHAW

    Andrew Jackson (R Calif.) Aug. 4, 1923-—; House 1973-77.

    HINSHAW

    John Carl Williams (R Calif.) July 28, 1894-Aug. 5, 1956; House 1939-Aug. 5, 1956.

    HINSON

    Jon C. (R Miss.) March 16, 1942-—; House 1979-April 13, 1981.

    HOBBS

    Samuel Francis (Sam) (D Ala.) Oct. 5, 1887-May 31, 1952; House 1935-51.

    HOBLITZELL

    John Dempsey Jr. (R W.Va.) Dec. 30, 1912-Jan. 6, 1962; Senate Jan. 25-Nov. 4, 1958.

    HOCH

    Daniel Knabb (D Pa.) Jan. 31, 1866-Oct. 11, 1960; House 1943-47.

    HODGES

    Kaneaster Jr. (D Ark.) Aug. 20, 1938-—; Senate Dec. 15, 1977-Jan. 3, 1979.

    HOEVEN

    Charles Bernard (R Iowa) March 30, 1895-Nov. 9, 1980; House 1943-65.

    HOEY

    Clyde Roark (D N.C.) Dec. 11, 1877-May 12, 1954; House Dec. 16, 1919-21; Senate 1945-May 12, 1954; Gov. 1937-41.

    HOFFMAN

    Carl Henry (R Pa.) Aug. 12, 1896-—; House May 21, 1946-47.

    HOFFMAN

    Clare Eugene (R Mich.) Sept. 10, 1875-Nov. 3, 1967; House 1935-63.

    HOFFMAN

    Elmer Joseph (R Ill.) July 7, 1899-June 25, 1976; House 1959-65.

    HOFFMAN

    Richard William (R Ill.) Dec. 23, 1893-July 6, 1975; House 1949-57.

    HOGAN

    Earl Lee (D Ind.) March 13, 1920-House 1959-61.

    HOGAN

    Lawrence Joseph (R Md.) Sept. 30, 1928-—; House 1969-75.

    HOLIFIELD

    Chester Earl (D Calif.) Dec. 3, 1903-—; House 1943-Dec. 31, 1974.

    HOLLAND

    Elmer Joseph (D Pa.) Jan. 8, 1894-Aug. 9, 1968; House May 19, 1942-43; Jan. 24, 1956-Aug. 9, 1968.

    HOLLAND

    Kenneth Lamar (D S.C.) Nov. 24, 1934-—; House 1975-—.

    HOLLAND

    Spessard Lindsey (D Fla.) July 10, 1892-Nov. 6, 1971; Senate Sept. 25, 1946-71; Gov. 1941-45.

    HOLLENBECK

    Harold Capistran (R N.J.) Dec. 29, 1938-—; House 1977-—.

    HOLLINGS

    Ernest F. (D S.C.) Jan. 1, 1922-—; Senate Nov. 9, 1966-—; Gov. 1959-63.

    HOLMES

    Otis Halbert (Hal) (grandson of Dudley Chase Haskell) (R Wash.) Feb. 22, 1902-July 27, 1977; House 1943-59.

    HOLMES

    Pehr Gustaf (R Mass.) April 9, 1881-Dec. 19, 1952; House 1931-47.

    HOLT

    Joseph Franklin 3d (R Calif.) July 6, 1924-—; House 1953-61.

    HOLT

    Marjorie Sewell (R Md.) Sept. 17, 1920-—; House 1973-—.

    HOLTZMAN

    Elizabeth (D N.Y.) Aug. 11, 1941-—; House 1973-81.

    HOLTZMAN

    Lester (D N.Y.) June 1, 1913-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1961.

    HOOK

    Frank Eugene (D Mich.) May 26, 1893-—; House 1935-43, 1945-47.

    HOPE

    Clifford Ragsdale (R Kan.) June 9, 1893-May 16, 1970; House 1927-57.

    HOPKINS

    Larry Jones (R Ky.) Oct. 25, 1933-—; House 1979-—.

    HORAN

    Walter Franklin (R Wash.) Oct. 15, 1898-Dec. 19, 1966; House 1943-65.

    HORTON

    Frank Jefferson (R N.Y.) Dec. 12, 1919-—; House 1963-—.

    HOSMER

    Craig (R Calif.) May 6, 1915-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1974.

    HOWARD

    James John (D N.J.) July 24, 1927-—; House 1965-—.

    HOWE

    Allan Turner (D Utah) Sept. 6, 1927-—; House 1975-77.

    HOWELL

    Charles Robert (D N.J.) April 23, 1904-July 5, 1973; House 1949-55.

    HOWELL

    George Evan (R Ill.) Sept. 21, 1905-Jan. 18, 1980; House 1941-Oct. 5, 1947.

    HOYER

    Steny (D Md.) June 14, 1939-—; House June 3, 1981.

    HRUSKA

    Roman Lee (R Neb.) Aug. 16, 1904-—; House 1953-Nov. 8, 1954; Senate Nov. 8, 1954-Dec. 27, 1976.

    HUBBARD

    Carroll Jr. (D Ky.) July 7, 1937-—; House 1975-—.

    HUBER

    Robert James (R Mich.) Aug. 29, 1922-—; House 1973-75.

    HUBER

    Walter B. (D Ohio) June 29, 1903-—; House 1945-51.

    HUCKABY

    Thomas Jerry (D La.) July 19, 1941-—; House 1977-—.

    HUDDLESTON

    George Jr. (son of George Huddleston) (D Ala.) March 19, 1920-Sept. 14, 1971; House 1955-65.

    HUDDLESTON

    Walter Darlington (D Ky.) April 15, 1926-—; Senate 1973-—.

    HUDNUT

    William Herbert III (R Ind.) Oct. 17, 1932-—; House 1973-75.

    HUFFMAN

    James Wylie (D Ohio) Sept. 13, 1894-—; Senate Oct. 8, 1945-Nov. 5, 1946.

    HUGHES

    Harold Everett (D Iowa) Feb. 10, 1922-—; Senate 1969-75; Gov. 1963-69.

    HUGHES

    William John (D N.J.) Oct. 17, 1932-—; House 1975-—.

    HULL

    Merlin (R Wis.) Dec. 18, 1870-May 17, 1953; House 1929-31, 1935-May 17, 1953 (1929-31 Republican, 1935-47 Progressive, 1947-53 Republican).

    HULL

    William Raleigh Jr. (D Mo.) April 17, 1906-Aug. 15, 1977; House 1955-73.

    HUMPHREY

    Gordon J. (R N.H.) Oct. 7, 1940-—; Senate 1979-—.

    HUMPHREY

    Hubert Horatio Jr. (husband of Muriel Buck Humphrey) (D Minn.) May 27, 1911-Jan. 13, 1978; Senate 1949-Dec. 29, 1964, 1971-Jan. 13, 1978; Vice Pres. 1965-69.

    HUMPHREY

    Muriel Buck (widow of Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr.) (D Minn.) Feb. 20, 1912-—; Senate Feb. 6, 1978-Nov. 7, 1978.

    HUMPHREYS

    Robert (D Ky.) Aug. 20, 1893-Dec. 31, 1977; Senate June 21-Nov. 6, 1956.

    HUNGATE

    William Leonard (D Mo.) Dec. 24, 1922-—; House Nov. 3, 1964-77.

    HUNT

    John Edmund (R N.J.) Nov. 25, 1908-—; House 1967-75.

    HUNT

    Lester Callaway (D Wyo.) July 8, 1892-June 19, 1954; Senate 1949-June 19, 1954; Gov. 1943-49.

    HUNTER

    Allan Oakley (R Calif.) June 15, 1916-—; House 1951-55.

    HUNTER

    Duncan L. (R Calif.) May 31, 1948-—; House 1981-—.

    HUOT

    Joseph Oliva (D N.H.) Aug. 11, 1917-—; House 1965-67.

    HUTCHINSON

    Edward (R Mich.) Oct. 13, 1914-—; House 1963-77.

    HUTCHINSON

    John G. (D W. Va.) Feb 4, 1935-—; House June 10, 1980-81.

    HUTTO

    Earl Dewitt (D Fla.) May 12, 1926-—; House 1979-—.

    HYDE

    DeWitt Stephen (R Md.) March 21, 1909-—; House 1953-59.

    HYDE

    Henry John (R Ill.) April 18, 1924-—; House 1975-—.

    I
    ICHORD

    Richard H. (D Mo.) June 27, 1926-—; House 1961-81.

    IKARD

    Frank Neville (D Texas) Jan. 30, 1914-—; House Sept. 8, 1951-Dec. 15, 1961.

    INOUYE

    Daniel Ken (D Hawaii) Sept. 7, 1924-—; House Aug. 21, 1959-63; Senate 1963-—.

    IRELAND

    Andrew P. (D Fla.) Aug. 23, 1930-—; House 1977-—.

    IRVING

    Theodore Leonard (D Mo.) March 24, 1898-March 8, 1962; House 1949-53.

    IRWIN

    Donald J. (D Conn.) Sept. 7, 1926-—; House 1959-61, 1965-69.

    ISACSON

    Leo (AL N.Y.) April 20, 1910-—; House Feb. 17, 1948-49.

    IVES

    Irving McNeil (R N.Y.) Jan. 24, 1896-Feb. 24, 1962; Senate 1947-59.

    IZAC

    Edouard Victor Michel (D Calif.) Dec. 18, 1891-—; House 1937-47.

    J
    JACKSON

    Donald L. (R Calif.) Jan. 23, 1910-—; House 1947-61.

    JACKSON

    Henry Martin (D Wash.) May 31, 1912-—; House 1941-53; Senate 1953-—; Chrmn. Dem. Nat. Comm. 1960-61.

    JACOBS

    Andrew Sr. (father of Andrew Jacobs Jr.) (D Ind.) Feb. 22, 1906-—; House 1949-51.

    JACOBS

    Andrew Jr. (son of Andrew Jacobs Sr., husband of Martha Elizabeth Keys) (D Ind.) Feb. 24, 1932-—; House 1965-73, 1975-—.

    JAMES

    Benjamin Franklin (R Pa.) Aug. 1, 1885-Jan. 26, 1961; House 1949-59.

    JARMAN

    John (R Okla.) July 17, 1915-—; House 1951-77 (1951-Jan. 24, 1975 Democrat, Jan. 24, 1975-77 Republican).

    JARMAN

    Pete (D Ala.) Oct. 31, 1892-Feb. 17, 1955; House 1937-49.

    JAVITS

    Jacob Koppel (R N.Y.) May 18, 1904-—; House 1947-Dec. 31, 1954; Senate Jan. 9, 1957-81.

    JEFFORDS

    James Merrill (R Vt.) May 11, 1934-—; House 1975-—.

    JEFFREY

    Harry Palmer (R Ohio) Dec. 26, 1901-—; House 1943-45.

    JEFFRIES

    James Edmund (R Kan.) June 1, 1925-—; House 1979-—.

    JENISON

    Edward Halsey (R Ill.) July 27, 1907-—; House 1947-53.

    JENKINS

    Edgar Lanier (D Ga.) Jan. 4, 1933-—; House 1977-—.

    JENKINS

    Mitchell (R Pa.) Jan. 24, 1896-Sept. 15, 1977; House 1947-49.

    JENKINS

    Thomas Albert (R Ohio) Oct. 28, 1880-Dec. 21, 1959; House 1925-59.

    JENNER

    William Ezra (R Ind.) July 21, 1908-—; Senate Nov. 14, 1944-45, 1947-59.

    JENNINGS

    John Jr. (R Tenn.) June 6, 1880-Feb. 27, 1956; House Dec. 30, 1939-51.

    JENNINGS

    William Pat (D Va.) Aug. 20, 1919-—; House 1955-67.

    JENRETTE

    John Wilson Jr. (D S.C.) May 19, 1936-—; House 1975-Dec. 10, 1980.

    JENSEN

    Benton Franklin (Ben) (R Iowa) Dec. 16, 1892-Feb. 5, 1970; House 1939-65.

    JEPSEN

    Roger William (R Iowa) Dec. 23, 1928-—; Senate 1979-—.

    JOELSON

    Charles S. (D N.J.) Jan. 27, 1916-—; House 1961-Sept. 4, 1969.

    JOHANSEN

    August Edgar (R Mich.) July 21, 1905-—; House 1955-65.

    JOHNSON

    Albert Walter (R Pa.) April 17, 1906-—; House Nov. 5, 1963-77.

    JOHNSON

    Anton Joseph (R Ill.) Oct. 20, 1878-April 16, 1958; House 1939-49.

    JOHNSON

    Byron Lindberg (D Colo.) Oct. 12, 1917-—; House 1959-61.

    JOHNSON

    Edwin Carl (D Colo.) Jan. 1, 1884-May 30, 1970; Senate 1937-55; Gov. 1933-37, 1955-57.

    JOHNSON

    Glen Dale (D Okla.) Sept. 11, 1911-—; House 1947-49.

    JOHNSON

    Harold Terry (D Calif.) Dec. 2, 1907-—; House 1959-81.

    JOHNSON

    Hiram Warren (son of Grove Lawrence Johnson) (R Calif.) Sept. 2, 1866-Aug. 6, 1945; Senate March 16, 1917-Aug. 6, 1945; Gov. 1911-17.

    JOHNSON

    James Paul (R Colo.) June 2, 1930-—; House 1973-81.

    JOHNSON

    Jed Joseph (father of Jed Johnson Jr.) (D Okla.) July 31, 1888-May 8, 1963; House 1927-47.

    JOHNSON

    Jed Jr. (son of Jed Joseph Johnson) (D Okla.) Dec. 17, 1939-—; House 1965-67.

    JOHNSON

    Justin Leroy (R Calif.) April 8, 1888-March 26, 1961; House 1943-57.

    JOHNSON

    Lester Roland (D Wis.) June 16, 1901-July 24, 1975; House Oct. 13, 1953-65.

    JOHNSON

    Luther Alexander (D Texas) Oct. 29, 1875-June 6, 1965; House 1923-July 17, 1946.

    JOHNSON

    Lyndon Baines (D Texas) Aug. 27, 1908-Jan. 22, 1973; House April 10, 1937-49; Senate 1949-61; Vice Pres. 1961-Nov. 22, 1963; President Nov. 22, 1963-69.

    JOHNSON

    Noble Jacob (R Ind.) Aug. 23, 1887-March 17, 1968; House 1925-31, 1939-July 1, 1948.

    JOHNSON

    Thomas F. (D Md.) June 26, 1909-—; House 1959-63.

    JOHNSTON

    John Bennett Jr. (D La.) June 10, 1932-—; Senate Nov. 14, 1972-—.

    JOHNSTON

    Olin DeWitt Talmadge (D S.C.) Nov. 18, 1896-April 18, 1965; Senate 1945-April 18, 1965; Gov. 1935-39; 1943-45.

    JOHNSTON

    W. Eugene (R N.C.) March 3, 1936-—; House 1981-—.

    JONAS

    Charles Raper (son of Charles Andrew Jonas) (R N.C.) Dec. 9, 1904-—; House 1953-73.

    JONAS

    Edgar Allan (R Ill.) Oct. 14, 1885-Nov. 14, 1965; House 1949-55.

    JONES

    Ed (D Tenn.) April 20, 1912-—; House March 25, 1969-—.

    JONES

    Hamilton Chamberlain (D N.C.) Sept. 26, 1884-Aug. 10, 1957; House 1947-53.

    JONES

    Homer Raymond (R Wash.) Sept. 3, 1893-Nov. 26, 1970; House 1947-49.

    JONES

    James Robert (D Okla.) May 5, 1939-—; House 1973-—.

    JONES

    Paul Caruthers (D Mo.) March 12, 1901-Feb. 10, 1981; House Nov. 2, 1948-69.

    JONES

    Robert Emmett Jr. (D Ala.) June 12, 1912-—; House Jan. 28, 1947-77.

    JONES

    Robert Franklin (F Ohio) June 25, 1907-June 22, 1968; House 1939-Sept. 2, 1947.

    JONES

    Walter B. (D N.C.) Aug. 19, 1913-—; House Feb. 5, 1966-—.

    JONES

    Woodrow Wilson (D N.C.) Jan. 26, 1914-—; House Nov. 7, 1950-57.

    JONKMAN

    Bartel John (R Mich.) April 28, 1884-June 13, 1955; House Feb. 19, 1940-49.

    JORDAN

    Barbara Charline (D Texas) Feb. 21, 1936-—; House 1973-79.

    JORDAN

    Benjamin Everett (D N.C.) Sept. 8, 1896-March 15, 1974; Senate April 19, 1958-73.

    JORDAN

    Leonard Beck (R Idaho) May 15, 1899-—; Senate Aug. 6, 1962-73; Gov. 1951-55.

    JUDD

    Walter Henry (R Minn.) Sept. 25, 1898-—; House 1943-63.

    K
    KARST

    Raymond Willard (D Mo.) Dec. 31, 1902-—; House 1949-51.

    KARSTEN

    Frank Melvin (D Mo.) Jan. 7, 1913-—; House 1947-69.

    KARTH

    Joseph Edward (D Minn.) Aug. 26, 1922-—; House 1959-77.

    KASEM

    George Albert (D Calif.) April 6, 1919-—; House 1959-61.

    KASSEBAUM

    Nancy Landon (R Kan.) July 29, 1932-—; Senate Dec. 23, 1978-—.

    KASTEN

    Robert Walter Jr. (R Wis.) June 19, 1942-—; House 1975-79; Senate 1981-—.

    KASTENMEIER

    Robert William (D Wis.) Jan. 24, 1924-—; House 1959-—.

    KAZEN

    Abraham Jr. (D Texas) Jan. 17, 1919-—; House 1967-—.

    KEAN

    Robert Winthrop (son of Hamilton Fish Kean, nephew of John Kean) (R N.J.) Sept. 28, 1893-Sept. 22, 1980; House 1939-59.

    KEARNEY

    Bernard William (R N.Y.) May 23, 1889-June 3, 1976; House 1943-59.

    KEARNS

    Carroll Dudley (R Pa.) May 7, 1900-June 11, 1976; House 1947-63.

    KEATING

    Kenneth Barnard (R N.Y.) May 18, 1900-May 5, 1975; House 1947-59; Senate 1959-65.

    KEATING

    William John (R Ohio) March 30, 1927-—; House 1971-Jan. 3, 1974.

    KEE

    James (son of John and Maude Elizabeth Kee) (D W.Va.) April 15, 1917-—; House 1965-73.

    KEE

    John (husband of Maude Elizabeth Kee, father of James Kee) (D W.Va.) Aug. 22, 1874-May 8, 1951; House 1933-May 8, 1951.

    KEE

    Maude Elizabeth (widow of John Kee, mother of James Kee) (D W.Va.) ?-Feb. 16, 1975; House July 17, 1951-65.

    KEEFE

    Frank Bateman (R Wis.) Sept. 23, 1887-Feb. 5, 1952; House 1939-51.

    KEENEY

    Russell Watson (R Ill.) Dec. 29, 1897-Jan. 11, 1958; House 1957-Jan. 11, 1958.

    KEFAUVER

    Carey Estes (D Tenn.) July 26, 1903-Aug. 10, 1963; House Sept. 13, 1939-49; Senate 1949-Aug. 10, 1963.

    KEITH

    Hastings (R Mass.) Nov. 22, 1915-—; House 1959-73.

    KELLEY

    Augustine Bernard (D Pa.) July 9, 1883-Nov. 20, 1957; House 1941-Nov. 20, 1957.

    KELLY

    Edna Flannery (D N.Y.) Aug. 20, 1906-—; House Nov. 8, 1949-69.

    KELLY

    Edward Austin (D Ill.) April 3, 1892-Aug. 30, 1969; House 1931-43, 1945-47.

    KELLY

    Richard (R Fla.) July 31, 1924-—; House 1975-81.

    KEM

    James Preston (R Mo.) April 2, 1890-Feb. 24, 1965; Senate 1947-53.

    KEMP

    Jack French (R N.Y.) July 13, 1935-—; House 1971-—.

    KENNEDY

    Edward Moore (brother of John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Robert Francis Kennedy, grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald) (D Mass.) Feb. 22, 1932-—; Senate Nov. 7, 1962-—.

    KENNEDY

    John Fitzgerald (brother of Edward Moore Kennedy and Robert Francis Kennedy, grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald) (D Mass.) May 29, 1917-Nov. 22, 1963; House 1947-53; Senate 1953-Dec. 22, 1960; President 1961-Nov. 22, 1963.

    KENNEDY

    Robert Francis (brother of Edward Moore Kennedy and John Fitzgerald Kennedy, grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald) (D N.Y.) Nov. 20, 1925-June 6, 1968; Senate 1965-June 6, 1968; Atty. Gen. 1961-64.

    KEOGH

    Eugene James (D N.Y.) Aug. 30, 1907-—; House 1937-67.

    KERR

    John Hosea (grandnephew of John Kerr) (D N.C.) Dec. 31, 1873-June 21, 1958; House Nov. 6, 1923-53.

    KERR

    Robert Samuel (D Okla.) Sept. 11, 1896-Jan. 1, 1963; Senate 1949-Jan. 1, 1963; Gov. 1943-47.

    KERSTEN

    Charles Joseph (R Wis.) May 26, 1902-Oct. 31, 1972; House 1947-49; 1951-55.

    KETCHUM

    William Matthew (R Calif.) Sept. 2, 1921-June 24, 1978; House 1973-June 24, 1978.

    KEYS

    Martha Elizabeth (wife of Andrew Jacobs Jr., daughter-in-law of Andrew Jacobs Sr.) (D Kan.) Aug. 10, 1930-—; House 1975-79.

    KILBURN

    Clarence Evans (R N.Y.) April 13, 1893-May 20, 1975; House Feb. 13, 1940-65.

    KILDAY

    Paul Joseph (D Texas) March 29, 1900-Oct. 12, 1968; House 1939-Sept. 24, 1961.

    KILDEE

    Dale Edward (D Mich.) Sept. 16, 1929-—; House 1977-—.

    KILGORE

    Harley Martin (D W.Va.) Jan. 11, 1893-Feb. 28, 1956; Senate 1941-Feb. 28, 1956.

    KILGORE

    Joe Madison (D Texas) Dec. 10, 1918-—; House 1955-65.

    KINDNESS

    Thomas Norman (R Ohio) Aug. 26, 1929-—; House 1975-—.

    KING

    Carleton James (R N.Y.) June 15, 1904-Nov. 19, 1977; House 1961-Dec. 31, 1974.

    KING

    Cecil Rhodes (D Calif.) Jan. 13, 1898-March 17, 1974; House Aug. 25, 1942-69.

    KING

    David Sjodahl (son of William Henry King) (D Utah) June 20, 1917-—; House 1959-63, 1965-67.

    KING

    Karl Clarence (R Pa.) Jan. 26, 1897-April 16, 1974; House Nov. 6, 1951-57.

    KINZER

    John Roland (R Pa.) March 28, 1874-July 25, 1955; House Jan. 28, 1930-47.

    KIRWAN

    Michael Joseph (D Ohio) Dec. 2, 1886-July 27, 1970; House 1937-July 27, 1970.

    KITCHIN

    Alvin Paul (nephew of Claude Kitchin and William Walton Kitchin, grandson of William Hodges Kitchin) (D N.C.) Sept. 13, 1908-—; House 1957-63.

    KLEIN

    Arthur George (D N.Y.) Aug. 8, 1904-Feb. 20, 1968; House July 29, 1941-45, Feb. 19, 1946-Dec. 31, 1956.

    KLEPPE

    Thomas S. (R N.D.) July 1, 1919-—; House 1967-71; Secy. of the Interior, July 17, 1975-77.

    KLUCZYNSKI

    John Carl (D Ill.) Feb. 15, 1896-Jan. 26, 1975; House 1951-Jan. 26, 1975.

    KNOWLAND

    William Fife (son of Joseph Russell Knowland) (R Calif.) June 26, 1908-Feb. 23, 1974; Senate Aug. 26, 1945-59.

    KNOX

    Victor Alfred (R Mich.) Jan. 13, 1899-Dec. 13, 1976; House 1953-65.

    KNUTSON

    Coya Gjesdal (DFL Minn.) Aug. 22, 1912-—; House 1955-59.

    KNUTSON

    Harold (R Minn.) Oct. 20, 1880-Aug. 21, 1953; House 1917-49.

    KOCH

    Edward Irving (D/L N.Y.) Dec. 12, 1924-—; House 1969-Dec. 31, 1977.

    KOGOVSEK

    Raymond Peter (D Colo.) Aug. 19, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    KOPPLEMANN

    Herman Paul (D Conn.) May 1, 1880-Aug. 11, 1957; House 1933-39, 1941-43, 1945-47.

    KORNEGAY

    Horace Robinson (D N.C.) March 12, 1924-—; House 1961-69.

    KOSTMAYER

    Peter Houston (D Pa.) Sept. 27, 1946-—; House 1977-81.

    KOWALSKI

    Frank (D Conn.) Oct. 18, 1907-Oct. 11, 1974; House 1959-63.

    KRAMER

    Kenneth Bentley (R Colo.) Feb. 19, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    KREBS

    John Hans (D Calif.) Dec. 17, 1926-—; House 1975-79.

    KREBS

    Paul J. (D N.J.) May 26, 1912-—; House 1965-67.

    KRUEGER

    Otto (R N.D.) Sept. 7, 1890-June 6, 1963; House 1953-59.

    KRUEGER

    Robert Charles (D Texas) Sept. 19, 1935-—; House 1975-79.

    KRUSE

    Edward H. Jr. (D Ind.) Oct. 22, 1918-—; House 1949-51.

    KUCHEL

    Thomas Henry (R Calif.) Aug. 15, 1910-—; Senate Jan. 2, 1953-69.

    KUNKEL

    John Crain (grandson of John Christian Kunkel, great-grandson of John Sergeant, great-great-grandson of Robert Whitehill) (R Pa.) July 21, 1898-July 27, 1970; House 1939-51, May 16, 1961-Dec. 30, 1966.

    KUPFERMAN

    Theodore R. (R N.Y.) May 12, 1920-—; House Feb. 8, 1966-69.

    KUYKENDALL

    Dan H. (R Tenn.) July 9, 1924-—; House 1967-75.

    KYL

    John Henry (R Iowa) May 9, 1919-—; House Dec. 15, 1959-65, 1967-73.

    KYROS

    Peter N. (D Maine) July 11, 1925-—; House 1967-75.

    L
    LAFALCE

    John Joseph (D N.Y.) Oct. 6, 1939-—; House 1975-—.

    LA FOLLETTE

    Charles Marion (great-grandson of William Heilman) (R Ind.) Feb. 27, 1898-—; House 1943-47.

    LA FOLLETTE

    Robert Marion Jr. (son of Robert Marion La Follette) (Prog. Wis.) Feb. 6, 1895-Feb. 24, 1953; Senate Sept. 30, 1925-35, 1935-47 (1925-35 Republican Progressive, 1935-47 Progressive).

    LAFORE

    John Armand Jr. (R Pa.) May 25, 1905-—; House Nov. 5, 1957-61.

    LAGOMARSINO

    Robert John (R Calif.) Sept. 4, 1926-—; House March 5, 1974-—.

    LAIRD

    Melvin Robert (R Wis.) Sept. 1, 1922-—; House 1953-Jan. 21, 1969; Secy. of Defense 1969-73.

    LAIRD

    William Ramsey III (D W.Va.) June 2, 1916-Jan. 7, 1974; Senate March 13-Nov. 6, 1956.

    LANDGREBE

    Earl F. (R Ind.) Jan. 21, 1916-—; House 1969-75.

    LANDIS

    Gerald Wayne (R Ind.) Feb. 23, 1895-Sept. 6, 1971; House 1939-49.

    LANDRUM

    Phillip Mitchell (D Ga.) Sept. 10, 1909-—; House 1953-77.

    LANE

    Thomas Joseph (D Mass.) July 6, 1898-—; House Dec. 30, 1941-63.

    LANGEN

    Odin Elsford Stanley (R Minn.) Jan. 5, 1913-July 6, 1976; House 1959-71.

    LANGER

    William (R N.D.) Sept. 30, 1886-Nov. 8, 1959; Senate 1941-Nov. 8, 1959; Gov. 1933-34, 1937-39.

    LANHAM

    Fritz Garland (son of Samuel Willis Tucker Lanham) (D Texas) Jan. 3, 1880-July 31, 1965; House April 19, 1919-47.

    LANHAM

    Henderson Lovelace (D Ga.) Sept. 14, 1888-Nov. 10, 1957; House 1947-Nov. 10, 1957.

    LANKFORD

    Richard Estep (D Md.) July 22, 1914-—; House 1955-65.

    LANTAFF

    William Courtland (D Fla.) July 31, 1913-Jan. 28, 1970; House 1951-55.

    LANTOS

    Tom (D Calif.) Feb. 1, 1928; House 1981-—.

    LARCADE

    Henry Dominique Jr. (D La.) July 12, 1890-March 15, 1966; House 1943-53.

    LATHAM

    Henry Jepson (R N.Y.) Dec. 10, 1908-—; House 1945-Dec. 31, 1958

    LATTA

    Delbert Leroy (R Ohio) March 5, 1920-—; House 1959-—.

    LAUSCHE

    Frank John (D Ohio) Nov. 14, 1895-—; Senate 1957-69; Gov. 1945-47, 1949-57.

    LAXALT

    Paul Dominique (R Nev.) Aug. 2, 1922-—; Senate Dec. 18, 1974-—; Gov. 1967-71.

    LEA

    Clarence Frederick (D Calif.) July 11, 1874-June 20, 1964; House 1917-49.

    LEACH

    Anthony Claude (Buddy) Jr. (D La.) March 30, 1934-—; House 1979-81.

    LEACH

    James A.S. (R Iowa) Oct. 15, 1942-—; House 1977-—.

    LEAHY

    Edward Laurence (D R.I.) Feb. 9, 1886-July 22, 1953; Senate Aug. 24, 1949-Dec. 18, 1950.

    LEAHY

    Patrick Joseph (D Vt.) March 31, 1940-—; Senate 1975-—.

    LEATH

    James Marvin (D Texas) May 6, 1931-—; House 1979-—.

    LeBOUTILLIER

    John (R N.Y.) May 26, 1953-—; House 1981-—.

    LE COMPTE

    Karl Miles (R Iowa) May 25, 1887-Sept. 30, 1972; House 1939-59.

    LEDERER

    Raymond Francis (D Pa.) May 19, 1938-—; House 1977-May 5, 1981.

    LEE

    Gary A. (R N.Y.) Aug. 18, 1933-—; House 1979-—.

    LeFANTE

    Joseph Anthony (D N.J.) Sept.8, 1928-—; House 1977-Dec. 23, 1978.

    LE FEVRE

    Jay (R N.Y.) Sept. 6, 1893-April 26, 1970; House 1943-51.

    LEGGETT

    Robert L. (D Calif.) July 26, 1926-—; House 1963-79.

    LEHMAN

    Herbert Henry (D N.Y.) March 28, 1878-Dec. 5, 1963; Senate Nov. 9, 1949-57; Gov. 1933-42.

    LEHMAN

    William (D Fla.) Oct. 4, 1913-—; House 1973-—.

    LELAND

    George Thomas (Mickey) (D Texas) Nov. 27, 1944-—; House 1979-—.

    LEMKE

    William (R N.D.) Aug. 13, 1878-May 30, 1950; House 1933-41, 1943-May 30, 1950 (1933-41 Nonpartisan Republican, 1943-50 Republican).

    LENNON

    Alton Asa (D N.C.) Aug. 17, 1906-—; Senate July 10, 1953-Nov. 28, 1954; House 1957-73.

    LENT

    Norman Frederick (R N.Y.) March 23, 1931-—; House 1971-—.

    LESINSKI

    John (father of John Lesinski Jr.) (D Mich.) Jan. 3, 1885-May 27, 1950; House 1933-May 27, 1950.

    LESINSKI

    John Jr. (son of John Lesinski) (D Mich.) Dec. 28, 1914-—; House 1951-65.

    LEVERING

    Robert Woodrow (son-in-law of Usher L. Burdick, brother-in-law of Quentin N. Burdick) (D Ohio) Oct. 3, 1914-—; House 1959-61.

    LEVIN

    Carl Milton (D Mich.) June 28, 1934-—; Senate 1979-—.

    LEVITAS

    Elliott Harris (D Ga.) Dec. 26, 1930-—; House 1975-—.

    LEWIS

    Earl Ramage (R Ohio) Feb. 22, 1887-Feb. 1, 1956; House 1939-41, 1943-49.

    LEWIS

    Jerry (R Calif.) Oct. 21, 1934-—; House 1979-—.

    LEWIS

    William (R Ky.) Sept. 22, 1868-Aug. 8, 1959; House April 24, 1948-49.

    LIBONATI

    Roland Victor (D Ill.) Dec. 29, 1900-—; House Dec. 31, 1957-65.

    LICHTENWALTER

    Franklin Herbert (R Pa.) March 28, 1910-March 4, 1973; House Sept. 9, 1947-51.

    LIND

    James Francis (D Pa.) Oct. 17, 1900-—; House 1949-53.

    LINDSAY

    John Vliet (R N.Y.) Nov. 24, 1921-—; House 1959-Dec. 31, 1965.

    LINEHAN

    Neil Joseph (D Ill.) Sept. 23, 1895-Aug. 23, 1967; House 1949-51.

    LINK

    Arthur A. (D N.D.) May 24, 1914-—; House 1971-73; Gov. 1973-—.

    LINK

    William Walter (D Ill.) Feb. 12, 1884-Sept. 23, 1950; House 1945-47.

    LIPSCOMB

    Glenard Paul (R Calif.) Aug. 19, 1915-Feb. 1, 1970; House Nov. 10, 1953-Feb. 1, 1970.

    LITTON

    Jerry Lon (D Mo.) May 12, 1937-Aug. 3, 1976; House 1973-Aug. 3, 1976.

    LIVINGSTON

    Robert (Bob) Linligthgow Jr. (R La.) April 30, 1943-—; House Sept. 7, 1977-—.

    LLOYD

    James Frederick (D Calif.) Sept. 27, 1922-—; House 1975-81.

    LLOYD

    Sherman Parkinson (R Utah) Jan. 11, 1914-Dec. 15, 1979; House 1963-65, 1967-73.

    LODGE

    Henry Cabot Jr. (grandson of Henry Cabot Lodge, brother of John Davis Lodge, nephew of Augustus Peabody Gardner) (R Mass.) July 5, 1902-—; Senate 1937-Feb. 3, 1944, 1947-53.

    LODGE

    John Davis (grandson of Henry Cabot Lodge, brother of Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., nephew of Augustus Peabody Gardner) (R Conn.) Oct. 20, 1903-—; House 1947-51; Gov. 1951-55.

    LOEFFLER

    Thomas Gilbert (R Texas) Aug. 1, 1946-—; House 1979-—.

    LONG

    Clarence Dickinson (D Md.) Dec. 11, 1908-—; House 1963-—.

    LONG

    Edward Vaughn (D Mo.) July 18, 1908-Nov. 6, 1972; Senate Sept. 23, 1960-Dec. 27, 1968.

    LONG

    George Shannon (brother of Huey Pierce Long, brother-in-law of Rose McConnell Long, uncle of Russell Billiu Long, cousin of Gillis William Long) (D La.) Sept. 11, 1883-March 22, 1958; House 1953-March 22, 1958.

    LONG

    Gillis William (cousin of Huey Pierce Long, Rose McConnell Long, Russell Billiu Long and George Shannon Long) (D La.) May 4, 1923-—; House 1963-65, 1973-—.

    LONG

    Oren Ethelbirt (D Hawaii) March 4, 1889-May 6, 1965; Senate Aug. 21, 1959-63; Gov. (Terr.) 1951-53.

    LONG

    Russell Billiu (son of Huey Pierce Long and Rose McConnell Long, nephew of George Shannon Long) (D La.) Nov. 3, 1918-—; Senate Dec. 31, 1948-—.

    LONG

    Speedy O. (D La.) June 16, 1928-—; House 1965-73.

    LOSER

    Joseph Carlton (D Tenn.) Oct. 1, 1892-—; House 1957-63.

    LOTT

    Chester Trent (R Miss.) Oct. 9, 1941-—; House 1973-—.

    LOVE

    Francis Johnson (R W.Va.) Jan. 23, 1901-—; House 1947-49.

    LOVE

    Rodney Marvin (D Ohio) July 18, 1908-—; House 1965-67.

    LOVRE

    Harold Orrin (R S.D.) Jan. 30, 1904-Jan. 17, 1972; House 1949-57.

    LOWENSTEIN

    Allard K. (D-L N.Y.) Jan. 16, 1929-March 14, 1980; House 1969-71.

    LOWERY

    Bill (R Calif.) May 2, 1947-—; House 1981-—.

    LOWRY

    Michael E. (D Wash.) March 8, 1939-—; House 1979-—.

    LUCAS

    Scott Wike (D Ill.) Feb. 19, 1892-Feb. 22, 1968; House 1935-39; Senate 1939-51.

    LUCAS

    Wingate Hezekiah (D Texas) May 1, 1908-—; House 1947-55.

    LUCE

    Clare Boothe (stepdaughter of Albert Elmer Austin) (R Conn.) April 10, 1903-—; House 1943-47.

    LUDLOW

    Louis Leon (D Ind.) June 24, 1873-Nov. 28, 1950; House 1929-49.

    LUGAR

    Richard Green (R Ind.) April 4, 1932-—; Senate 1977-—.

    LUJAN

    Manuel Jr. (R N.M.) May 12, 1928-—; House 1969-—.

    LUKEN

    Thomas Andrew (D Ohio) July 9, 1925-—; House March 5, 1974-75, 1977-—.

    LUKENS

    Donald E. (Buz) (R Ohio) Feb. 11, 1931-—; House 1967-71.

    LUNDINE

    Stanley N. (D N.Y.) Feb. 4, 1939-—; House March 8, 1976-—.

    LUNGREN

    Daniel Edward (R Calif.) Sept. 22, 1946-—; House 1979-—.

    LUSK

    Georgia L. (D N.M.) May 12, 1893-Jan. 5, 1971; House 1947-49.

    LUSK

    Hall Stoner (D Ore.) Sept. 21, 1883-—; Senate March 16-Nov. 8, 1960.

    LYLE

    John Emmett Jr. (D Texas) Sept. 4, 1910-—; House 1945-55.

    LYNCH

    Walter Aloysius (D N.Y.) July 7, 1894-Sept. 10, 1957; House Feb. 20, 1940-51.

    M
    MACDONALD

    Torbert Hart (D Mass.) June 6, 1917-May 21, 1976; House 1955-May 21, 1976.

    MacGREGOR

    Clark (R Minn.) July 12, 1922-—; House 1961-71.

    MACHEN

    Hervey Gilbert (D Md.) Oct. 14, 1916-—; House 1965-69.

    MACHROWICZ

    Thaddeus Michael (D Mich.) Aug. 21, 1899-Feb. 17, 1970; House 1951-Sept. 18, 1961.

    MACK

    Peter Francis Jr. (D Ill.) Nov. 1, 1916-—; House 1949-63.

    MACK

    Russell Vernon (R Wash.) June 13, 1891-March 28, 1960; House June 7, 1947-March 28, 1960.

    MACKAY

    James Armstrong (D Ga.) June 25, 1919-—; House 1965-67.

    MACKIE

    John C. (D Mich.) June 1, 1920-—; House 1965-67.

    MacKINNON

    George Edward (R Minn.) April 22, 1906-—; House 1947-49.

    MACY

    William Kingsland (R N.Y.) Nov. 21, 1889-July 15, 1961; House 1947-51.

    MADDEN

    Ray John (D Ind.) Feb. 25, 1892-—; House 1943-77.

    MADIGAN

    Edward Rell (R Ill.) Jan. 13, 1936-—; House 1973-—.

    MAGEE

    Clare (D Mo.) March 31, 1899-Aug. 7, 1969; House 1949-53.

    MAGNUSON

    Donald Hammer (D Wash.) March 7, 1911-Oct. 5, 1979; House 1953-63.

    MAGNUSON

    Warren Grant (D Wash.) April 12, 1905-—; House 1937-Dec. 13, 1944; Senate Dec. 14, 1944-81; Pres. pro tempore Jan. 15, 1979-81.

    MAGUIRE

    Gene Andrew (D N.J.) March 11, 1939-—; House 1975-81.

    MAHON

    George Herman (D Texas) Sept. 22, 1900-—; House 1935-79.

    MAILLIARD

    William Somers (R Calif.) June 10, 1917-—; House 1953-March 5, 1974.

    MALLARY

    Richard Walker (R Vt.) Feb. 21, 1929-—; House Jan. 7, 1972-75.

    MALONE

    George Wilson (R Nev.) Aug. 7, 1890-May 19, 1961; Senate 1947-59.

    MALONEY

    Francis Thomas (D Conn.) March 31, 1894-Jan. 16, 1945; House 1933-35; Senate 1935-Jan. 16, 1945.

    MALONEY

    Franklin John (R Pa.) March 29, 1899-Sept. 15, 1958; House 1947-49.

    MALONEY

    Paul Herbert (D La.) Feb. 14, 1876-March 26, 1967; House 1931-Dec. 15, 1940, 1943-47.

    MANASCO

    Carter (D Ala.) Jan. 3, 1902-—; House June 24, 1941-49.

    MANKIN

    Helen Douglas (D Ga.) Sept. 11, 1896-July 25, 1956; House Feb. 12, 1946-47.

    MANN

    James Robert (D S.C.) April 27, 1920-—; House 1969-79.

    MANSFIELD

    Joseph Jefferson (D Texas) Feb. 9, 1861-July 12, 1947; House 1917-July 12, 1947.

    MANSFIELD

    Michael Joseph (Mike) (D Mont.) March 16, 1903-—; House 1943-53; Senate 1953-77.

    MARAZITI

    Joseph James (R N.J.) June 15, 1912-—; House 1973-75.

    MARCANTONIO

    Vito (AL N.Y.) Dec. 10, 1902-Aug. 9, 1954; House 1935-37, 1939-51 (1935-37 Republican, 1939-51 American Laborite).

    MARKEY

    Edward John (D Mass.) July 11, 1946-—; House Nov. 2, 1976-—.

    MARKS

    Marc Lincoln (R Pa.) Feb. 12, 1927-—; House 1977-—.

    MARLENEE

    Ronald Charles (R Mont.) Aug. 8, 1935-—; House 1977-—.

    MARRIOTT

    David Daniel (R Utah) Nov. 2, 1939-—; House 1977-—.

    MARSALIS

    John Henry (D Colo.) May 9, 1904-—; House 1949-51.

    MARSH

    John O. Jr. (D Va.) Aug. 7, 1926-—; House 1963-71.

    MARSHALL

    Fred (D Minn.) March 13, 1906-—; House 1949-63.

    MARTIN

    David O'B. (R N.Y.) April 26, 1944-—; House 1981-—.

    MARTIN

    David Thomas (R Neb.) July 9, 1907-—; House 1961-Dec. 31, 1974.

    MARTIN

    Edward (R Pa.) Sept. 18, 1879-March 19, 1967; Senate 1947-59; Gov. 1943-47.

    MARTIN

    James D. (R Ala.) Sept. 1, 1918-—; House 1965-67.

    MARTIN

    James Grubbs (R N.C.) Dec. 11, 1935-—; House 1973-—.

    MARTIN

    Joseph William Jr. (R Mass.) Nov. 3, 1884-March 6, 1968; House 1925-67; Speaker 1947-49, 1953-55; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1940-42.

    MARTIN

    Lynn M. (R Ill.) Dec. 26, 1939-—; House 1981-—.

    MARTIN

    Patrick Minor (R Calif.) Nov. 25, 1924-July 18, 1968; House 1963-65.

    MARTIN

    Thomas Ellsworth (R Iowa) Jan. 18, 1893-June 27, 1971; House 1939-55; Senate 1955-61.

    MASON

    Noah Morgan (R Ill.) July 19, 1882-March 29, 1965; House 1937-63.

    MATHEWS

    Frank Asbury Jr. (R N.J.) Aug. 3, 1890-Feb. 5, 1964; House Nov. 6, 1945-49.

    MATHIAS

    Charles McC. Jr. (R Md.) July 24, 1922-—; House 1961-69; Senate 1969-—.

    MATHIAS

    Robert B. (R Calif.) Nov. 17, 1930-—; House 1967-75.

    MATHIS

    Marvin Dawson (D Ga.) Nov. 30, 1940-—; House 1971-81.

    MATSUI

    Robert Takeo (D Calif.) Sept. 17, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    MATSUNAGA

    Spark Masayuki (D Hawaii) Oct. 8, 1916-—; House 1963-77; Senate 1977-—.

    MATTHEWS

    Donald Ray (Billy) (D Fla.) Oct. 3, 1907-—; House 1953-67.

    MATTINGLY

    Mack (R Ga.) Jan. 7, 1931-—; Senate 1981-—.

    MATTOX

    James Albon (D Texas) Aug. 29, 1943-—; House 1977-—.

    MAVROULES

    Nicholas (D Mass.) Nov. 1, 1929-—; House 1979-—.

    MAY

    Andrew Jackson (D Ky.) June 24, 1875-Sept. 6, 1959; House 1931-47.

    MAY

    Catherine Dean (Barnes) (R Wash.) May 18, 1914-—; House 1959-71.

    MAY

    Edwin Hyland Jr. (R Conn.) May 28, 1924-—; House 1957-59.

    MAYBANK

    Burnet Rhett (D S.C.) March 7, 1899-Sept. 1, 1954; Senate Nov. 5, 1941-Sept. 1, 1954; Gov. 1939-41.

    MAYNE

    Wiley (R Iowa) Jan. 19, 1917-—; House 1967-75.

    MAZZOLI

    Romano Louis (D Ky.) Nov. 2, 1932-—; House 1971-—.

    McCARRAN

    Patrick Anthony (Pat) (D Nev.) Aug. 8, 1876-Sept. 28, 1954; Senate 1933-Sept. 28, 1954.

    McCARTHY

    Eugene Joseph (D Minn.) March 29, 1916-—; House 1949-59; Senate 1959-71.

    McCARTHY

    Joseph Raymond (R Wis.) Nov. 14, 1908-May 2, 1957; Senate 1947-May 2, 1957.

    McCARTHY

    Richard Dean (D N.Y.) Sept. 24, 1927-—; House 1965-71.

    McCLELLAN

    John Little (D Ark.) Feb. 25, 1896-Nov. 28, 1977; House 1935-39; Senate 1943-Nov. 28, 1977.

    McCLORY

    Robert (R Ill.) Jan. 31, 1908-—; House 1963-—.

    McCLOSKEY

    Paul N. (Pete) Jr. (R Calif.) Sept. 29, 1927-—; House Dec. 12, 1967-—.

    McCLURE

    James A. (R Idaho) Dec. 27, 1924-—; House 1967-73; Senate 1973-—.

    McCOLLISTER

    John Yetter (R Neb.) June 10, 1921-—; House 1971-77.

    McCOLLUM

    Bill (R Fla.) July 12, 1944-—; House 1981-—.

    McCONNELL

    Samuel Kerns Jr. (R Pa.) April 6, 1901-—; House Jan. 18, 1944-Sept. 1, 1957.

    McCORD

    James Nance (D Tenn.) March 17, 1879-Sept. 2, 1968; House 1943-45; Gov. 1945-49.

    McCORMACK

    John William (D Mass.) Dec. 21, 1891-Nov. 22, 1980; House Nov. 6, 1928-71; Speaker 1962-71.

    McCORMACK

    Mike (D Wash.) Dec. 14, 1921-—; House 1971-81.

    McCOWEN

    Edward Oscar (R Ohio) June 29, 1877-Nov. 4, 1953; House 1943-49.

    McCULLOCH

    William Moore (R Ohio) Nov. 24, 1901-Feb. 22, 1980; House Nov. 4, 1947-73.

    McCURDY

    David K. (D Okla.) March 30, 1950-—; House 1981-—.

    McDADE

    Joseph Michael (R Pa.) Sept. 29, 1931-—; House 1963-—.

    McDONALD

    Jack H. (R Mich.) June 28, 1932-—; House 1967-73.

    McDONALD

    Lawrence Patton (D Ga.) April 1, 1935-—; House 1975-—.

    McDONOUGH

    Gordon Leo (R Calif.) Jan. 2, 1895-June 25, 1968; House 1945-63.

    McDOWELL

    Harris Brown Jr. (D Del.) Feb. 10, 1906-—; House 1955-57, 1959-67.

    McDOWELL

    John Ralph (R Pa.) Nov. 6, 1902-Dec. 11, 1957; House 1939-41, 1947-49.

    McEWEN

    Robert Cameron (R N.Y.) Jan. 5, 1920-—; House 1965-81.

    McEWEN

    Robert D. (R Ohio) Jan. 12, 1950-—; House 1981-—.

    McFALL

    John Joseph (D Calif.) Feb. 20, 1918-—; House 1957-Dec. 31, 1978.

    McFARLAND

    Ernest William (D Ariz.) Oct. 9, 1894-—; Senate 1941-53; Gov. 1955-59.

    McGARVEY

    Robert Neill (R Pa.) Aug. 14, 1888-June 28, 1952; House 1947-49.

    McGEE

    Gale William (D Wyo.) March 17, 1915-—; Senate 1959-77.

    McGEHEE

    Daniel Rayford (D Miss.) Sept. 10, 1883-Feb. 9, 1962; House 1935-47.

    McGINLEY

    Donald Francis (D Neb.) June 30, 1920-—; House 1959-61.

    McGLINCHEY

    Herbert Joseph (D Pa.) Nov. 7, 1904-—; House 1945-47.

    McGOVERN

    George Stanley (D S.D.) July 19, 1922-—; House 1957-61; Senate 1963-81.

    McGRATH

    Christopher Columbus (D N.Y.) May 15, 1902-—; House 1949-53.

    McGRATH

    James Howard (D R.I.) Nov. 28, 1903-Sept. 2, 1966; Senate 1947-Aug. 23, 1949; Gov. 1941-45; Chrmn. Dem. Nat. Comm. 1947-49; Atty. Gen. 1949-52.

    McGRATH

    Raymond J. (R N.Y.) March 27, 1941-—; House 1981-—.

    McGRATH

    Thomas C. Jr. (D N.J.) April 22, 1927-—; House 1965-67.

    McGREGOR

    J. Harry (R Ohio) Sept. 30, 1896-Oct. 7, 1958; House Feb. 27, 1940-Oct. 7, 1958.

    McGUIRE

    John Andrew (D Conn.) Feb. 28, 1906-May 28, 1976; House 1949-53.

    McHUGH

    Matthew Francis (D N.Y.) Dec. 6, 1938-—; House 1975-—.

    McINTIRE

    Clifford Guy (R Maine) May 4, 1908-Oct. 1, 1974; House Oct. 22, 1951-65.

    McINTOSH

    Robert John (R Mich.) Sept. 16, 1922-—; House 1957-59.

    McINTYRE

    Thomas James (D N.H.) Feb. 20, 1915-—; Senate Nov. 7, 1962-79.

    McKAY

    Koln Gunn (D Utah) Feb. 23, 1925-—; House 1971-81.

    McKELLAR

    Kenneth Douglas (D Tenn.) Jan. 29, 1869-Oct. 25, 1957; House Nov. 9, 1911-17; Senate 1917-53; Pres. pro tempore 1945-47, 1949-53.

    McKENZIE

    Charles Edgar (D La.) Oct. 3, 1896-June 7, 1956; House 1943-47.

    McKEVITT

    James Douglas (Mike) (R Colo.) Oct. 26, 1928-—; House 1971-73.

    McKINNEY

    Stewart Brett (R Conn.) Jan. 30, 1931-—; House 1971-—.

    McKINNON

    Clinton Dotson (D Calif.) Feb. 5, 1906-—; House 1949-53.

    McKNEALLY

    Martin B. (R N.Y.) Dec. 31, 1914-—; House 1969-71.

    McLEAN

    Donald Holman (R N.J.) March 18, 1884-Aug. 19, 1975; House 1933-45.

    McLOSKEY

    Robert Thaddeus (R Ill.) June 26, 1907-—; House 1963-65.

    McMAHON

    Gregory (R N.Y.) March 19, 1915-—; House 1947-49.

    McMAHON

    James O'Brien (D Conn.) Oct. 6, 1903-July 28, 1952; Senate 1945-July 28, 1952.

    McMILLAN

    John Lanneau (D S.C.) ? -Sept. 3, 1977; House 1939-73.

    McMILLEN

    Rolla Coral (R Ill.) Oct. 5, 1880-May 6, 1961; House June 13, 1944-51.

    McMULLEN

    Chester Bartow (D Fla.) Dec. 6, 1902-Nov. 3, 1953; House 1951-53.

    McMURRAY

    Howard Johnstone (D Wis.) March 3, 1901-Aug. 14, 1961; House 1943-45.

    McNAMARA

    Patrick Vincent (D Mich.) Oct. 4, 1894-April 30, 1966; Senate 1955-April 30, 1966.

    McSPADDEN

    Clem Rogers (D Okla.) Nov. 9, 1925-—; House 1973-75.

    McSWEEN

    Harold Barnett (D La.) July 19, 1926-—; House 1959-63.

    McSWEENEY

    John (D Ohio) Dec. 19, 1890-Dec. 13, 1969; House 1923-29, 1937-39, 1949-51.

    McVEY

    Walter Lewis (R Kan.) Feb. 19, 1922-—; House 1961-63.

    McVEY

    William Estus (R Ill.) Dec. 13, 1885-Aug. 10, 1958; House 1951-Aug. 10, 1958.

    McVICKER

    Roy Harrison (D Colo.) Feb. 20, 1924-Sept. 15, 1973; House 1965-67.

    MEAD

    James Michael (D N.Y.) Dec. 27, 1885-March 15, 1964; House 1919-Dec. 2, 1938; Senate Dec. 3, 1938-47.

    MEADE

    Hugh Allen (D Md.) April 4, 1907-July 8, 1949; House 1947-49.

    MEADE

    Wendell Howes (R Ky.) Jan. 18, 1912-—; House 1947-49.

    MEADER

    George (R Mich.) Sept. 13, 1907-—; House 1951-65.

    MECHEM

    Edwin Leard (R N.M.) July 2, 1912-—; Senate Nov. 30, 1962-Nov. 3, 1964; Gov. 1951-55, 1957-59, 1961-62.

    MEEDS

    Lloyd (D Wash.) Dec. 11, 1927-—; House 1965-79.

    MELCHER

    John (D Mont.) Sept. 6, 1924-—; House June 24, 1969-77; Senate 1977-—.

    MERRILL

    D. Bailey (R Ind.) Nov. 22, 1912-—; House 1953-55.

    MERROW

    Chester Earl (R N.H.) Nov. 15, 1906-Feb. 10, 1974; House 1943-63.

    MESKILL

    Thomas J. (R Conn.) Jan. 30, 1928-—; House 1967-71; Gov. 1971-75.

    METCALF

    Lee Warren (D Mont.) Jan. 28, 1911-Jan. 12, 1978; House 1953-61; Senate 1961-Jan. 12, 1978.

    METCALFE

    Ralph Harold (D Ill.) May 29, 1910-Oct. 10, 1978; House 1971-Oct. 10, 1978.

    METZENBAUM

    Howard Morton (D Ohio) June 4, 1917-—; Senate Jan. 4-Dec. 23, 1974, Dec. 29, 1976-—.

    MEYER

    Herbert Alton (R Kan.) Aug. 30, 1886-Oct. 2, 1950; House 1947-Oct. 2, 1950.

    MEYER

    William Henry (D Vt.) Dec. 29, 1914-—; House 1959-61.

    MEYNER

    Helen Stevenson (D N.J.) March 5, 1929-—; House 1975-79.

    MEZVINSKY

    Edward Maurice (D Iowa) Jan. 17, 1937-—; House 1973-77.

    MICA

    Daniel Andrew (D Fla.) Feb. 4, 1944-—; House 1979-—.

    MICHEL

    Robert Henry (R Ill.) March 2, 1923-—; House 1957-—.

    MICHENER

    Earl Cory (R Mich.) Nov. 30, 1876-July 4, 1957; House 1919-33, 1935-51.

    MIKULSKI

    Barbara Ann (D Md.) July 20, 1936-—; House 1977-—.

    MIKVA

    Abner J. (D Ill.) Jan. 21, 1926-—; House 1969-73; 1975-—.

    MILES

    John Esten (D N.M.) July 28, 1884-Oct. 7, 1971; House 1949-51; Gov. 1939-43.

    MILFORD

    Dale (D Texas) Feb. 18, 1926-—; House 1973-79.

    MILLER

    Arthur Lewis (R Neb.) May 24, 1892-March 16, 1967; House 1943-59.

    MILLER

    Bert Henry (D Idaho) Dec. 15, 1879-Oct. 8, 1949; Senate Jan. 3-Oct. 8, 1949.

    MILLER

    Clarence E. (R Ohio) Nov. 1, 1917-—; House 1967-—.

    MILLER

    Clement Woodnutt (nephew of Thomas Woodnutt Miller) (D Calif.) Oct. 28, 1916-Oct. 7, 1962; House 1959-Oct. 7, 1962.

    MILLER

    Edward Tylor (R Md.) Feb. 1, 1895-Jan. 20, 1968; House 1947-59.

    MILLER

    George (D Calif.) May 17, 1945-—; House 1975-—.

    MILLER

    George Paul (D Calif.) Jan. 15, 1891-—; House 1945-73.

    MILLER

    Howard Shultz (D Kan.) Feb. 27, 1879-Jan. 2, 1970; House 1953-55.

    MILLER

    Jack Richard (R Iowa) June 6, 1916-—; Senate 1961-73.

    MILLER

    Ward MacLaughlin (R Ohio) Nov. 29, 1902-—; House Nov. 8, 1960-61.

    MILLER

    William Edward (R N.Y.) March 22, 1914-—; House 1951-65; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1961-64.

    MILLER

    William Jennings (R Conn.) March 12, 1899-Nov. 22, 1950; House 1939-41, 1943-45, 1947-49.

    MILLIKEN

    William H. Jr. (R Pa.) Aug. 19, 1897-July 4, 1969; House 1959-65.

    MILLIKIN

    Eugene Donald (R Colo.) Feb. 12, 1891-July 26, 1958; Senate Dec. 20, 1941-57.

    MILLS

    Wilbur Daigh (D Ark.) May 24, 1909-—; House 1939-77.

    MILLS

    William Oswald (R Md.) Aug. 12, 1924-May 24, 1973; House May 27, 1971-May 24, 1973.

    MINETA

    Norman Yoshio (D Calif.) Nov. 12, 1931-—; House 1975-—.

    MINISH

    Joseph George (D N.J.) Sept. 1, 1916-—; House 1963-—.

    MINK

    Patsy Takemoto (D Hawaii) Dec. 6, 1927-—; House 1965-77.

    MINSHALL

    William Edwin Jr. (R Ohio) Oct. 24, 1911-—; House 1955-75.

    MITCHELL

    Donald Jerome (R N.Y.) May 8, 1923-—; House 1973-—.

    MITCHELL

    Edward Archibald (R Ind.) Dec. 2, 1910-Dec. 11, 1979; House 1947-49.

    MITCHELL

    George John (D Maine) Aug. 20, 1933-—; Senate May 19, 1980-—.

    MITCHELL

    Harlan Erwin (D Ga.) Aug. 17, 1924-—; House Jan. 8, 1958-61.

    MITCHELL

    Hugh Burnton (D Wash.) March 22, 1907-—; Senate Jan. 10, 1945-Dec. 25, 1946; House 1949-53.

    MITCHELL

    Parren James (D Md.) April 29, 1922-—; House 1971-—.

    MIZE

    Chester L. (R Kan.) Dec. 25, 1917-—; House 1965-71.

    MIZELL

    Wilmer David (R N.C.) Aug. 13, 1930-—; House 1969-75.

    MOAKLEY

    John Joseph (D Mass.) April 27, 1927-—; House 1973-— (1973-75 Independent Democrat, 1975-—Democrat).

    MOELLER

    Walter Henry (D Ohio) March 15, 1910-—; House 1959-63, 1965-67.

    MOFFETT

    Anthony Joseph (D Conn.) Aug. 18, 1944-—; House 1975-—.

    MOLINARI

    Guy V. (R N.Y.) Nov. 23, 1928-—; House 1981-—.

    MOLLOHAN

    Robert Homer (D W.Va.) Sept. 18, 1909-—; House 1953-57, 1969-—.

    MONAGAN

    John Stephen (D Conn.) Dec. 23, 1911-—; House 1959-73.

    MONDALE

    Walter F. (D Minn.) Jan. 5, 1928-—; Senate Dec. 30, 1964-Dec. 29, 1976; Vice-Pres. 1977-81.

    MONRONEY

    Almer Stillwell Mike (D Okla.) March 2, 1902-Feb. 13, 1980; House 1939-51; Senate 1951-69.

    MONTGOMERY

    Gillespie V. (D Miss.) Aug. 5, 1920-—; House 1967-—.

    MONTOYA

    Joseph Manuel (D N.M.) Sept. 24, 1915-June 5, 1978; House April 9, 1957-Nov. 3, 1964; Senate Nov. 4, 1964-77.

    MOODY

    Arthur Edson Blair (D Mich.) Feb. 13, 1902-July 20, 1954; Senate April 23, 1951-Nov. 4, 1952.

    MOORE

    Arch Alfred Jr. (R W.Va.) April 16, 1923-—; House 1957-69; Gov. 1969-77.

    MOORE

    Edward Hall (R Okla.) Nov. 19, 1871-Sept. 2, 1950; Senate 1943-49.

    MOORE

    William Henson (R La.) Oct. 4, 1939-—; House Jan. 7, 1975-—.

    MOOREHEAD

    Tom Van Horn (R Ohio) April 12, 1898-—; House 1961-63.

    MOORHEAD

    Carlos John (R Calif.) May 6, 1922-—; House 1973-—.

    MOORHEAD

    William Singer (D Pa.) April 8, 1923-—; House 1959-81.

    MORANO

    Albert Paul (R Conn.) Jan. 18, 1908-—; House 1951-59.

    MORGAN

    Robert Burren (D N.C.) Oct. 5, 1925-—; Senate 1975-81.

    MORGAN

    Thomas Ellsworth (D Pa.) Oct. 13, 1906-—; House 1945-77.

    MORRIS

    Thomas Gayle (D N.M.) Aug. 20, 1919-—; House 1959-69.

    MORRIS

    Toby (D Okla.) Feb. 28, 1899-Sept. 1, 1973; House 1947-53, 1957-61.

    MORRISON

    James Hobson (D La.) Dec. 8, 1908-—; House 1943-67.

    MORRISON

    Sid (R W. Va.) May 13, 1933-—; House 1981-—.

    MORSE

    F. Bradford (R Mass.) Aug. 7, 1921-—; House 1961-May 1, 1972.

    MORSE

    Wayne Lyman (D Ore.) Oct. 20, 1900-July 22, 1974; Senate 1945-69 (1945-Oct. 24, 1952 Republican, Oct. 24, 1952-Feb. 17, 1955 Independent, Feb. 17, 1955-69 Democrat).

    MORTON

    Rogers Clark Ballard (brother of Thruston Ballard Morton) (R Md.) Sept. 19, 1914-April 19, 1979; House 1963-Jan. 29, 1971; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1969-71; Secy. of the Interior 1971-75; Secy. of Commerce 1975-76.

    MORTON

    Thruston Ballard (brother of Rogers Clark Ballard Morton) (R Ky.) Aug. 19, 1907-—; House 1947-53; Senate 1957-Dec. 16, 1968; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1959-61.

    MOSES

    John (D N.D.) June 12, 1885-March 3, 1945; Senate Jan. 3-March 3, 1945; Gov. 1939-45.

    MOSHER

    Charles Adams (R Ohio) May 7, 1906-—; House 1961-77.

    MOSS

    Frank Edward (D Utah) Sept. 23, 1911-—; Senate 1959-77.

    MOSS

    John Emerson Jr. (D Calif.) April 13, 1913-—; House 1953-Dec. 31, 1978.

    MOTT

    James Wheaton (R Ore.) Nov. 12, 1883-Nov. 12, 1945; House 1933-Nov. 12, 1945.

    MOTTL

    Ronald Milton (D Ohio) Feb. 6, 1934-—; House 1975-—.

    MOULDER

    Morgan Moore (D Mo.) Aug. 31, 1904-Nov. 12, 1976; House 1949-63.

    MOYNIHAN

    Daniel Patrick (D N.Y.) March 16, 1927-—; Senate 1977-—.

    MUHLENBERG

    Frederick Augustus (great-great grandson of Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg, great-great-grandnephew of John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg) (R Pa.) Sept. 25, 1887-Jan 19, 1980; House 1947-49.

    MULTER

    Abraham Jacob (D N.Y.) Dec. 24, 1900-—; House Nov. 4, 1947-Dec. 31, 1967.

    MUMMA

    Walter Mann (R Pa.) Nov. 20, 1890-Feb. 25, 1961; House 1951-Feb. 25, 1961.

    MUNDT

    Karl Earl (R S.D.) June 3, 1900-Aug. 16, 1974; House 1939-Dec. 30, 1948; Senate Dec. 31, 1948-73.

    MURDOCK

    John Robert (D Ariz.) April 20, 1885-Feb. 14, 1972; House 1937-53.

    MURDOCK

    Orrice Abram Jr. (Abe) (D Utah) July 18, 1893-Sept. 15, 1979; House 1933-41; Senate 1941-47.

    MURKOWSKI

    Frank H. (R Alaska) March 28, 1933-—; Senate 1981-—.

    MURPHY

    Austin J. (D Pa.) June 17, 1927-—; House 1977-—.

    MURPHY

    George Lloyd (R Calif.) July 4, 1902-—; Senate Jan. 1, 1965-Jan. 2, 1971.

    MURPHY

    James Joseph (D N.Y.) Nov. 3, 1898-Oct. 19, 1962; House 1949-53.

    MURPHY

    John Michael (D N.Y.) Aug. 3, 1926-—; House 1963-81.

    MURPHY

    John William (D Pa.) April 26, 1902-March 28, 1962; House 1943-July 17, 1946.

    MURPHY

    Maurice J. Jr. (R N.H.) Oct. 3, 1927-—; Senate Dec. 7, 1961-Nov. 6, 1962.

    MURPHY

    Morgan Francis (D Ill.) April 16, 1933-—; House 1971-81.

    MURPHY

    William Thomas (D Ill.) Aug. 7, 1899-Jan. 29, 1978; House 1959-71.

    MURRAY

    James Cunningham (D Ill.) May 16, 1917-—; House 1955-57.

    MURRAY

    James Edward (D Mont.) May 3, 1876-March 23, 1961; Senate Nov. 7, 1934-61.

    MURRAY

    Reid Fred (R Wis.) Oct. 16, 1887-April 29, 1952; House 1939-April 29, 1952.

    MURRAY

    Thomas Jefferson (D Tenn.) Aug. 1, 1894-Nov. 28, 1971; House 1943-67.

    MURTHA

    John Patrick Jr. (D Pa.) Jan. 17, 1932-—; House Feb. 5, 1974-—.

    MUSKIE

    Edmund Sixtus (D Maine) March 28, 1914-—; Senate 1959-May 7, 1980; Gov. 1955-59; Secy. of State May 8, 1980-81.

    MUSTO

    Raphael (D Pa.) March 30, 1929-—; House April 15, 1980-81.

    MYERS

    Francis John (D Pa.) Dec. 18, 1901-July 5, 1956; House 1939-45; Senate 1945-51.

    MYERS

    Gary Arthur (R Pa.) Aug. 16, 1937-—; House 1975-79.

    MYERS

    John Thomas (R Ind.) Feb. 8, 1927-—; House 1967-—.

    MYERS

    Michael J. (Ozzie) (D Pa.) May 4, 1943-—; House Nov. 2, 1976-Oct. 2, 1980.

    N
    NAPIER

    John L. (R S.C.) May 16, 1947-—; House 1981-—.

    NATCHER

    William Huston (D Ky.) Sept. 11, 1909-—; House Aug. 1, 1953-—.

    NEAL

    Stephen Lybrook (D N.C.) Nov. 7, 1934-—; House 1975-—.

    NEAL

    William Elmer (R W.Va.) Oct. 14, 1875-Nov. 12, 1959; House 1953-55, 1957-59.

    NEDZI

    Lucien Norbert (D Mich.) May 28, 1925-—; House Nov. 7, 1961-81.

    NEELY

    Matthew Mansfield (D W.Va.) Nov. 9, 1874-Jan. 18, 1958; House Oct. 14, 1913-21, 1945-47; Senate 1923-29, 1931-Jan. 12, 1941, 1949-Jan. 18, 1958; Gov. 1941-45.

    NELLIGAN

    James L. (R Pa.) Feb. 14, 1929-—; House 1981-—.

    NELSEN

    Ancher (R Minn.) Oct. 11, 1904-—; House 1959-75.

    NELSON

    Charles Pembroke (son of John Edward Nelson) (R Maine) July 2, 1907-June 8, 1962; House 1949-57.

    NELSON

    Clarence William (Bill) (D Fla.) Sept. 29, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    NELSON

    Gaylord (D Wis.) June 4, 1916-—; Senate 1963-81; Gov. 1959-63.

    NEUBERGER

    Maurine Brown (widow of Richard Lewis Neuberger) (D Ore.) Jan. 9, 1907-—; Senate Nov. 9, 1960-67.

    NEUBERGER

    Richard Lewis (husband of Maurine Brown Neuberger) (D Ore.) Dec. 26, 1912-March 9, 1960; Senate 1955-March 9, 1960.

    NICHOLS

    William (D Ala.) Oct. 16, 1918-—; House 1967-—.

    NICHOLSON

    Donald William (R Mass.) Aug. 11, 1888-Feb. 16, 1968; House Nov. 18, 1947-59.

    NICKLES

    Donald L. (R Okla.) Dec. 6, 1948-—; Senate 1981-—.

    NIMTZ

    F. Jay (R Ind.) Dec. 1, 1915-—; House 1957-59.

    NIX

    Robert Nelson Cornelius Sr. (D Pa.) Aug. 9, 1905-—; House May 20, 1958-79.

    NIXON

    Richard Milhous (R Calif.) Jan. 9, 1913-—; House 1947-Nov. 30, 1950; Senate Dec. 1, 1950-Jan. 1, 1953; Vice Pres. 1953-61; President 1969-Aug. 9, 1974.

    NODAR

    Robert Joseph Jr. (R N.Y.) March 23, 1916-—; House 1947-49.

    NOLAN

    Richard Michael (D Minn.) Dec. 17, 1943-—; House 1975-81.

    NOLAND

    James E. (D Ind.) April 22, 1920-—; House 1949-51.

    NORBLAD

    Albin Walter Jr. (R Ore.) Sept. 12, 1908-Sept. 20, 1964; House Jan. 11, 1946-Sept. 20, 1964.

    NORMAN

    Fred Barthold (R Wash.) March 21, 1882-April 18, 1947; House 1943-45, Jan. 3-April 18, 1947.

    NORRELL

    Catherine Dorris (widow of William Frank Norrell) (D Ark.) March 30, 1901-—; House April 18, 1961-63.

    NORRELL

    William Frank (husband of Catherine Dorris Norrell) (D Ark.) Aug. 29, 1896-Feb. 15, 1961; House 1939-Feb. 15, 1961.

    NORTON

    Mary Teresa (D N.J.) March 7, 1875-Aug. 2, 1959; House 1925-51.

    NOWAK

    Henry James (D N.Y.) Feb. 21, 1935-—; House 1975-—.

    NUNN

    Samuel Augustus (D Ga.) Sept. 8, 1938-—; Senate Nov. 8, 1972-—.

    NYGAARD

    Hjalmar (R N.D.) March 24, 1906-July 18, 1963; House 1961-July 18, 1963.

    O
    OAKAR

    Mary Rose (D Ohio) March 5, 1940-—; House 1977-—.

    OAKMAN

    Charles Gibb (R Mich.) Sept. 4, 1903-Oct. 28, 1973; House 1953-55.

    OBERSTAR

    James Louis (D Minn.) Sept. 10, 1934-—; House 1975-—.

    OBEY

    David Ross (D Wis.) Oct. 3, 1938-—; House April 1, 1969-—.

    O'BRIEN

    George Donoghue (D Mich.) Jan. 1, 1900-Oct. 25, 1957; House 1937-39, 1941-47, 1949-55.

    O'BRIEN

    George Miller (R Ill.) June 17, 1917-—; House 1973-—.

    O'BRIEN

    Leo William (D N.Y.) Sept. 21, 1900-—; House April 1, 1952-67.

    O'BRIEN

    Thomas Joseph (D Ill.) April 30, 1878-April 14, 1964; House 1933-39, 1943-April 14, 1964.

    O'CONNOR

    James Francis (D Mont.) May 7, 1878-Jan. 15, 1945; House 1937-Jan. 15, 1945.

    O'CONOR

    Herbert Romulus (D Md.) Nov. 17, 1896-March 4, 1960; Senate 1947-53; Gov. 1939-47.

    O'DANIEL

    Wilbert Lee (D Texas) March 11, 1890-May 11, 1969; Senate Aug. 4, 1941-49; Gov. 1939-41.

    O'HARA

    Barratt (D Ill.) April 28, 1882-Aug. 11, 1969; House 1949-51, 1953-69.

    O'HARA

    James Grant (D Mich.) Nov. 8, 1925-—; House 1959-77.

    O'HARA

    Joseph Patrick (R Minn.) Jan. 23, 1895-March 4, 1975; House 1941-59.

    O'KONSKI

    Alvin Edward (R Wis.) May 26, 1904-—; House 1943-73.

    OLIVER

    James Churchill (D Maine) Aug. 6, 1895-—; House 1937-43; 1959-61 (1937-43 Republican, 1959-61 Democrat).

    OLSEN

    Arnold (D Mont.) Dec. 17, 1916-—; House 1961-71.

    OLSON

    Alec G. (D Minn.) Sept. 11, 1930-—; House 1963-67.

    O'MAHONEY

    Joseph Christopher (D Wyo.) Nov. 5, 1884-Dec. 1, 1962; Senate Jan. 1, 1934-53; Nov. 29, 1954-61.

    O'NEAL

    Emmet (D Ky.) April 14, 1887-July 18, 1967; House 1935-47.

    O'NEAL

    Maston Emmett Jr. (D Ga.) July 19, 1907-—; House 1965-71.

    O'NEILL

    Harry Patrick (D Pa.) Feb. 10, 1889-June 24, 1953; House 1949-53.

    O'NEILL

    Thomas Phillip Jr. (D Mass.) Dec. 9, 1912-—; House 1953-—; Speaker 1977-—.

    OSMERS

    Frank Charles Jr. (R N.J.) Dec. 30, 1907-May 21, 1977; House 1939-43, Nov. 6, 1951-65.

    OSTERTAG

    Harold Charles (R N.Y.) June 22, 1896-—; House 1951-65.

    O'SULLIVAN

    Eugene Daniel (D Neb.) May 31, 1883-Feb. 7, 1968; House 1949-51.

    O'TOOLE

    Donald Lawrence (D N.Y.) Aug. 1, 1902-Sept. 12, 1964; House 1937-53.

    OTTINGER

    Richard Lawrence (D N.Y.) Jan. 27, 1929-—; House 1965-71, 1975-—.

    OUTLAND

    George Elmer (D Calif.) Oct. 8, 1906-—; House 1943-47.

    OVERTON

    John Holmes (uncle of Overton Brooks) (D La.) Sept. 17, 1875-May 14, 1948; House May 12, 1931-33; Senate 1933-May 14, 1948.

    OWENS

    Douglas Wayne (D Utah) May 2, 1937-—; House 1973-75.

    OWENS

    Thomas Leonard (R Ill.) Dec. 21, 1897-June 7, 1948; House 1947-June 7, 1948.

    P
    PACE

    Stephen (D Ga.) March 9, 1891-April 5, 1970; House 1937-51.

    PACKWOOD

    Robert William (R Ore.) Sept. 11, 1932-—; Senate 1969-—.

    PAGAN

    Bolivar (Coal. P.R.) May 16, 1897-Feb. 9, 1961; House (Res. Comm.) Dec. 26, 1939-45.

    PANETTA

    Leon Edward (D Calif.) June 28, 1938-—; House 1977-—.

    PARRIS

    Stanford E. (R Va.) Sept. 9, 1929-—; House 1973-75; Senate 1981-—.

    PASHAYAN

    Charles Sahag (Chip) Jr. (R Calif.) March 27, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    PASSMAN

    Otto Ernest (D La.) June 27, 1900-—; House 1947-77.

    PASTORE

    John Orlando (D R.I.) March 17, 1907-—; Senate Dec. 19, 1950-Dec. 28, 1976; Gov. 1945-50.

    PATMAN

    William N. (D Texas) March 26, 1927-—; House 1981-—.

    PATMAN

    Wright (D Texas) Aug. 6, 1893-March 7, 1976; House 1929-March 7, 1976.

    PATRICK

    Luther (D Ala.) Jan. 23, 1894-May 26, 1957; House 1937-43, 1945-47.

    PATTEN

    Edward James (D N.J.) Aug. 22, 1905-—; House 1963-81.

    PATTEN

    Harold Ambrose (D Ariz.) Oct. 6, 1907-Sept. 6, 1969; House 1949-55.

    PATTERSON

    Ellis Ellwood (D Calif.) Nov. 28, 1897-—; House 1945-47.

    PATTERSON

    James Thomas (R Conn.) Oct. 20, 1908-—; House 1947-59.

    PATTERSON

    Jerry Mumford (D Calif.) Oct. 25, 1934-—; House 1975-—.

    PATTISON

    Edward Worthington (D N.Y.) April 29, 1932-—; House 1975-79.

    PAUL

    Ronald Ernest (R Texas) Aug. 20, 1935-—; House April 3, 1976-77, 1979-—.

    PAYNE

    Frederick George (R Maine) July 24, 1904-June 15, 1978; Senate 1953-59; Gov. 1949-53.

    PEARSON

    James Blackwood (R Kan.) May 7, 1920-—; Senate Jan. 31, 1962-Dec. 23, 1978.

    PEASE

    Donald James (D Ohio) Sept. 26, 1931-—; House 1977-—.

    PEDEN

    Preston Elmer (D Okla.) June 28, 1914-—; House 1947-49.

    PELL

    Claiborne de Borda (son of Herbert Claiborne Pell Jr.) (D R.I.) Nov. 22, 1918-—; Senate 1961-—.

    PELLY

    Thomas Minor (R Wash.) Aug. 22, 1902-Nov. 21, 1973; House 1953-73.

    PEPPER

    Claude Denson (D Fla.) Sept. 8, 1900-—; Senate Nov. 4, 1936-51; House 1963-—.

    PERCY

    Charles Harting (R Ill.) Sept. 27, 1919-—; Senate 1967-—.

    PERKINS

    Carl Dewey (D Ky.) Oct. 15, 1912-—; House 1949-—.

    PETERSON

    Hugh (D Ga.) Aug. 21, 1898-Oct. 3, 1961; House 1935-47.

    PETERSON

    James Hardin (D Fla.) Feb. 11, 1894-March 28, 1978; House 1933-51.

    PETERSON

    Morris Blaine (D Utah) March 26, 1906-—; House 1961-63.

    PETRI

    Thomas E. (R Wis.) May 28, 1940-—; House April 9, 1979-—.

    PETTIS

    Jerry Lyle (husband of Shirley Neal Pettis) (R Calif.) July 18, 1916-Feb. 14, 1975; House 1967-Feb. 14, 1975.

    PETTIS

    Shirley Neal (widow of Jerry Lyle Pettis) (R Calif.) July 12, 1924-—; House April 29, 1975-79.

    PEYSER

    Peter A. (D N.Y.) Sept. 7, 1921-—; House 1971-77, 1979-—.

    PFEIFER

    Joseph Lawrence (D N.Y.) Feb. 6, 1892-April 19, 1974; House 1935-51.

    PFEIFFER

    William Louis (R N.Y.) May 29, 1907-—; House 1949-51.

    PFOST

    Gracie Bowers (D Idaho) March 12, 1906-Aug. 11, 1965; House 1953-63.

    PHILBIN

    Philip Joseph (D Mass.) May 29, 1898-June 14, 1972; House 1943-71.

    PHILLIPS

    Dayton Edward (R Tenn.) March 29, 1910-Oct. 23, 1980; House 1947-51.

    PHILLIPS

    John (R Calif.) Sept. 11, 1887-—; House 1943-57.

    PICKETT

    Thomas Augustus (Tom) (D Texas) Aug. 14, 1906-June 7, 1980; House 1945-June 30, 1952.

    PICKLE

    J. J. (Jake) (D Texas) Oct. 11, 1913-—; House Dec. 21, 1963-—.

    PIKE

    Otis G. (D N.Y.) Aug. 31, 1921-—; House 1961-79.

    PILCHER

    John Leonard (D Ga.) Aug. 27, 1898-—; House Feb. 4, 1953-65.

    PILLION

    John Raymond (R N.Y.) Aug. 10, 1904-Dec. 31, 1978; House 1953-65.

    PINERO

    Jesus T. (PD P.R.) April 16, 1897-Nov. 19, 1952; House (Res. Comm.) 1945-Sept. 2, 1946; Gov. 1946-48.

    PIRNIE

    Alexander (R N.Y.) April 16, 1903-—; House 1959-73.

    PITTENGER

    William Alvin (R Minn.) Dec. 29, 1885-Nov. 26, 1951; House 1929-33, 1935-37, 1939-47.

    PLOESER

    Walter Christian (R Mo.) Jan. 7, 1907-—; House 1941-49.

    PLUMLEY

    Charles Albert (son of Frank Plumley) (R Vt.) April 14, 1875-Oct. 31, 1964; House Jan. 16, 1934-51.

    POAGE

    William Robert (D Texas) Dec. 28, 1899-—; House 1937-Dec. 31, 1978.

    PODELL

    Bertram L. (D N.Y.) Dec. 27, 1925-—; House Feb. 20, 1968-75.

    POFF

    Richard Harding (R Va.) Oct. 19, 1923-—; House 1953-Aug. 29, 1972.

    POLANCO-ABREU

    Santiago (PD P.R.) Oct. 30, 1920-—; House 1965-69.

    POLK

    James Gould (D Ohio) Oct. 6, 1896-April 28, 1959; House 1931-41, 1949-April 28, 1959.

    POLLOCK

    Howard W. (R Alaska) April 11, 1920-—; House 1967-71.

    POOL

    Joe Richard (D Texas) Feb. 18, 1911-July 14, 1968; House 1963-July 14, 1968.

    PORTER

    Charles Orlando (D Ore.) April 4, 1919-—; House 1957-61.

    PORTER

    John Edward (R Ill.) June 1, 1935-—; House Jan. 24, 1980-—.

    POTTER

    Charles Edward (R Mich.) Oct. 30, 1916-Nov. 23, 1979; House Aug. 26, 1947-Nov. 4, 1952; Senate Nov. 5, 1952-59.

    POTTS

    David Matthew (R N.Y.) March 12, 1906-Sept. 11, 1976; House 1947-49.

    POULSON

    Norris (R Calif.) July 23, 1895-—; House 1943-45, 1947-June 11, 1953.

    POWELL

    Adam Clayton Jr. (D N.Y.) Nov. 29, 1908-April 4, 1972; House 1945-67, 1969-71.

    POWELL

    Walter E. (R Ohio) April 25, 1931-—; House 1971-75.

    POWERS

    David Lane (R N.J.) July 29, 1896-March 28, 1968; House 1933-Aug. 30, 1945.

    PRATT

    Eliza Jane (D N.C.) March 5, 1902-—; House May 25, 1946-47.

    PRESSLER

    Larry Lee (R S.D.) March 29, 1942-—; House 1975-79; Senate 1979-—.

    PRESTON

    Prince Hulon Jr. (D Ga.) July 5, 1908-Feb. 8, 1961; House 1947-61.

    PREYER

    Lunsford Richardson (D N.C.) Jan. 11, 1919-—; House 1969-81.

    PRICE

    Charles Melvin (D Ill.) Jan. 1, 1905-—; House 1945-—.

    PRICE

    Emory Hilliard (D Fla.) Dec. 3, 1899-Feb. 11, 1976; House 1943-49.

    PRICE

    Robert Dale (Bob) (R Texas) Sept. 7, 1927-—; House 1967-75.

    PRIEST

    James Percy (D Tenn.) April 1, 1900-Oct. 12, 1956; House 1941-Oct. 12, 1956.

    PRITCHARD

    Joel McFee (R Wash.) May 5, 1925-—; House 1973-—.

    PROKOP

    Stanley A. (D Pa.) ?-Nov. 11, 1977; House 1959-61.

    PROUTY

    Winston Lewis (R Vt.) Sept. 1, 1906-Sept. 10, 1971; House 1951-59; Senate 1959-Sept. 10, 1971.

    PROXMIRE

    William (D Wis.) Nov. 11, 1915-—; Senate Aug. 28, 1957-—.

    PRYOR

    David Hampton (D Ark.) Aug. 29, 1934-—; House Nov. 8, 1966-73; Senate 1979-—; Gov. 1975-79.

    PUCINSKI

    Roman Conrad (D Ill.) May 13, 1919-—; House 1959-73.

    PURCELL

    Graham Boynton Jr. (D Texas) May 5, 1919-—; House Jan. 27, 1962-73.

    PURSELL

    Carl Duane (R Mich.) Dec. 19, 1932-—; House 1977-—.

    PURTELL

    William Arthur (R Conn.) May 6, 1897-May 31, 1978; Senate Aug. 29-Nov. 4, 1952, 1953-59.

    Q
    QUAYLE

    James Danforth (R Ind.) Feb. 4, 1947-—; House 1977-81; Senate 1981-—.

    QUIE

    Albert Harold (R Minn.) Sept. 18, 1923-—; House Feb. 18, 1958-79.

    QUIGLEY

    James Michael (D Pa.) March 30, 1918-—; House 1955-57, 1959-61.

    QUILLEN

    James H. (Jimmy) (R Tenn.) Jan. 11, 1916-—; House 1963-—.

    QUINN

    Peter Anthony (D N.Y.) May 10, 1904-Dec. 23, 1974; House 1945-47.

    QUINN

    Thomas Vincent (D N.Y.) March 16, 1903-—; House 1949-Dec. 30, 1951.

    R
    RABAUT

    Louis Charles (D Mich.) Dec. 5, 1886-Nov. 12, 1961; House 1935-47, 1949-Nov. 12, 1961.

    RABIN

    Benjamin J. (D N.Y.) June 3, 1896-Feb. 22, 1969; House 1945-Dec. 31, 1947.

    RACE

    John Abner (D Wis.) May 12, 1914-—; House 1965-67.

    RADCLIFFE

    George Lovick (D Md.) Aug. 22, 1877-July 29, 1974; Senate 1935-47.

    RADWAN

    Edmund Patrick (R N.Y.) Sept. 22, 1911-Sept. 7, 1959; House 1951-59.

    RAHALL

    Nick Joe II (D W.Va.) May 20, 1949-—; House 1977-—.

    RAILSBACK

    Thomas F. (R Ill.) Jan. 22, 1932-—; House 1967-—.

    RAINS

    Albert M. (D Ala.) March 11, 1902-—; House 1945-65.

    RAMEY

    Homer Alonzo (R Ohio) March 2, 1891-April 13, 1960; House 1943-49.

    RAMSAY

    Robert Lincoln (D W.Va.) March 24, 1877-Nov. 14, 1956; House 1933-39, 1941-43, 1949-53.

    RAMSPECK

    Robert C. Word (D Ga.) Sept. 5, 1890-Sept. 10, 1972; House Oct. 2, 1929-Dec. 31, 1945.

    RANDALL

    William Joseph (D Mo.) July 16, 1909-—; House March 3, 1959-77.

    RANDOLPH

    Jennings (D W.Va.) March 8, 1902-—; House 1933-47; Senate Nov. 5, 1958-—.

    RANGEL

    Charles Bernard (D N.Y.) June 1, 1930-—; House 1971-—.

    RANKIN

    John Elliott (D Miss.) March 29, 1882-Nov. 26, 1960; House 1921-53.

    RARICK

    John Richard (D La.) Jan. 29, 1924-—; House 1967-75.

    RATCHFORD

    William Richard (D Conn.) May 24, 1934-—; House 1979-—.

    RAY

    John Henry (R N.Y.) Sept. 27, 1886-May 21, 1975; House 1953-63.

    RAYBURN

    Sam (D Texas) Jan. 6 1882-Nov. 16, 1961; House 1913-Nov. 16, 1961; Speaker 1940-47, 1949-53, 1955-61.

    RAYFIEL

    Leo Frederick (D N.Y.) March 22, 1888-Nov. 18, 1978; House 1945-Sept. 13, 1947.

    REAMS

    Henry Frazier (I Ohio) Jan. 15, 1897-Sept. 15, 1971; House 1951-55.

    REDDEN

    Monroe Minor (D N.C.) Sept. 24, 1901-—; House 1947-53.

    REDLIN

    Rolland W. (D N.D.) Feb. 29, 1920-—; House 1965-67.

    REECE

    Brazilla Carroll (husband of Louise Goff Reece) (R Tenn.) Dec. 22, 1889-March 19, 1961; House 1921-31, 1933-47, 1951-March 19, 1961; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1946-48.

    REECE

    Louise Goff (widow of Brazilla Carroll Reece, daughter of Guy Despard Goff, granddaughter of Nathan Goff) (R Tenn.) Nov. 6, 1898-May 14, 1970; House May 16, 1961-63.

    REED

    Chauncey William (R Ill.) June 2, 1890-Feb. 9, 1956; House 1935-Feb. 9, 1956.

    REED

    Clyde Martin (R Kan.) Oct. 19, 1871-Nov. 8, 1949; Senate 1939-Nov. 8, 1949; Gov. 1929-31.

    REED

    Daniel Alden (R N.Y.) Sept. 15, 1875-Feb. 19, 1959; House 1919-Feb. 19, 1959.

    REES

    Edward Herbert (R Kan.) June 3, 1886-Oct. 25, 1969; House 1937-61.

    REES

    Thomas M. (D Calif.) March 26, 1925-—; House Dec. 15, 1965-77.

    REEVES

    Albert Lee Jr. (R Mo.) May 31, 1906-—; House 1947-49.

    REGAN

    Kenneth Mills (D Texas) March 6, 1893-Aug. 15, 1959; House Aug. 23, 1947-55.

    REGULA

    Ralph Strauss (R Ohio) Dec. 3, 1924-—; House 1973-—.

    REID

    Charlotte Thompson (R Ill.) Sept. 27, 1913-—; House 1963-Oct. 7, 1971.

    REID

    Ogden Rogers (D N.Y.) June 24, 1925-—; House 1963-75 (1963-March 22, 1972 Republican, March 22, 1972-75 Democrat).

    REIFEL

    Benjamin (R S.D.) Sept. 19, 1906-—; House 1961-71.

    REINECKE

    Edwin (R Calif.) Jan. 7, 1924-—; House 1965-Jan. 21, 1969.

    RESA

    Alexander John (D Ill.) Aug. 4, 1887-July 4, 1964; House 1945-47.

    RESNICK

    Joseph Yale (D N.Y.) July 13, 1924-Oct. 6, 1969; House 1965-69.

    REUSS

    Henry Schoellkopf (D Wis.) Feb. 22, 1912-—; House 1955-—.

    REVERCOMB

    William Chapman (R W.Va.) July 20, 1895-Oct. 6, 1979; Senate 1943-49, Nov. 7, 1956-59.

    REYNOLDS

    Samuel Williams (R Neb.) Aug. 11, 1890-—; Senate July 3-Nov. 7, 1954.

    RHODES

    George Milton (D Pa.) Feb. 24, 1898-Oct. 23, 1978; House 1949-69.

    RHODES

    John Jacob (R Ariz.) Sept. 18, 1916-—; House 1953-—.

    RIBICOFF

    Abraham Alexander (D Conn.) April 9, 1910-—; House 1949-53; Senate 1963-81; Gov. 1955-61; Secy. of HEW 1961-62.

    RICH

    Carl West (R Ohio) Sept. 12, 1898-June 26, 1972; House 1963-65.

    RICH

    Robert Fleming (R Pa.) June 23, 1883-April 28, 1968; House Nov. 4, 1930-43, 1945-51.

    RICHARDS

    James Prioleau (D S.C.) Aug. 31, 1894-Feb. 21, 1979; House 1933-57.

    RICHMOND

    Frederick William (D N.Y.) Nov. 15, 1923-—; House 1975-—.

    RIEGLE

    Donald Wayne Jr. (D Mich.) Feb. 4, 1938-—; House 1967-Dec. 30, 1976; Senate Dec. 30, 1976-— (1967-Feb. 27, 1973 Republican, Feb. 27, 1973-—Democrat).

    RIEHLMAN

    Roy Walter (R N.Y.) Aug. 26, 1899-July 16, 1978; House 1947-65.

    RILEY

    Corinne Boyd (widow of John Jacob Riley) (D S.C.) July 4, 1893-April 12, 1979; House April 10, 1962-63.

    RILEY

    John Jacob (husband of Corinne Boyd Riley) (D S.C.) Feb. 1, 1895-Jan. 1, 1962; House 1945-49, 1951-Jan. 1, 1962.

    RINALDO

    Matthew John (R N.J.) Sept. 1, 1931-—; House 1973-—.

    RISENHOOVER

    Theodore Marshall (D Okla.) Nov. 3, 1934-—; House 1975-79.

    RITTER

    Donald Lawrence (R Pa.) Oct. 21, 1940-—; House 1979-—.

    RIVERS

    Lucius Mendel (D S.C.) Sept. 28, 1905-Dec. 28, 1970; House 1941-Dec. 28, 1970.

    RIVERS

    Ralph Julian (D Alaska) May 23, 1903-Aug. 14, 1976; House 1959-67.

    RIZLEY

    Ross (R Okla.) July 5, 1892-March 4, 1969; House 1941-49.

    ROBERTS

    Clint (R S.D.) Jan. 30, 1935-—; House 1981-—.

    ROBERTS

    Herbert Ray (D Texas) March 28, 1913-—; House Jan. 30, 1962-81.

    ROBERTS

    Kenneth Allison (D Ala.) Nov. 1, 1912-—; House 1951-65.

    ROBERTS

    Pat (R Kan.) April 20, 1936-—; House 1981-—.

    ROBERTSON

    A. Willis (D Va.) May 27, 1887-Nov. 1, 1971; House 1933-Nov. 5, 1946; Senate Nov. 6, 1946-67.

    ROBERTSON

    Charles Raymond (R N.D.) Sept. 5, 1889-Feb. 18, 1951; House 1941-43, 1945-49.

    ROBERTSON

    Edward Vivian (R Wyo.) May 27, 1881-April 15, 1963; Senate 1943-49.

    ROBESON

    Edward John Jr. (D Va.) Aug. 9, 1890-March 10, 1966; House May 2, 1950-59.

    ROBINSON

    James Kenneth (R Va.) May 14, 1916-—; House 1971-—.

    ROBINSON

    James William (D Utah) Jan. 19, 1878-Dec. 2, 1964; House 1933-47.

    ROBISON

    Howard Winfield (R N.Y.) Oct. 30, 1915-—; House Jan. 14, 1958-75.

    ROBSION

    John Marshall (father of John Marshall Robsion Jr.) (R Ky.) Jan. 2, 1873-Feb. 17, 1948; House 1919-Jan. 10, 1930, 1935-Feb. 17, 1948; Senate Jan. 11-Nov. 30, 1930.

    ROBSION

    John Marshall Jr. (son of John Marshall Robsion) (R Ky.) Aug. 28, 1904-—; House 1953-59.

    ROCKWELL

    Robert Fay (R Colo.) Feb. 11, 1886-Sept. 29, 1950; House Dec. 9, 1941-49.

    RODGERS

    Harold (Hal) (R Ky.) Dec. 31, 1937-—; House 1981-—.

    RODGERS

    Robert Lewis (R Pa.) June 2, 1875-May 9, 1960; House 1939-47.

    RODINO

    Peter Wallace Jr. (D N.J.) June 7, 1909-—; House 1949-—.

    ROE

    Dudley George (D Md.) March 23, 1881-Jan. 4, 1970; House 1945-47.

    ROE

    James A. (D N.Y.) July 9, 1896-April 22, 1967; House 1945-47.

    ROE

    Robert A. (D N.J.) Feb. 28, 1924-—; House Nov. 4, 1969-—.

    ROEMER

    Buddy (D La.) Oct. 4, 1943; House 1981-—.

    ROGERS

    Byron Giles (D Colo.) Aug. 1, 1900-—; House 1951-71.

    ROGERS

    Dwight Laing (father of Paul Grant Rogers) (D Fla.) Aug. 17, 1886-Dec. 1, 1954; House 1945-Dec. 1, 1954.

    ROGERS

    Edith Nourse (widow of John Jacob Rogers) (R Mass.) 1881-Sept. 10, 1960; House June 30, 1925-Sept. 10, 1960.

    ROGERS

    George Frederick (D N.Y.) March 19, 1887-Nov. 20, 1948; House 1945-47.

    ROGERS

    Paul Grant (son of Dwight Laing Rogers) (D Fla.) June 4, 1921-—; House Jan. 11, 1955-79.

    ROGERS

    Walter Edward (D Texas) July 19, 1908-—; House 1951-67.

    ROHRBOUGH

    Edward Gay (R W.Va.) 1874-Dec. 12, 1956; House 1943-45, 1947-49.

    ROMULO

    Carlos Pena (—P.I.) Jan. 14, 1901-—; House (Res. Comm.) Aug. 10, 1944-July 4, 1946.

    RONAN

    Daniel J. (D Ill.) July 13, 1914-Aug. 13, 1969; House 1965-Aug. 13, 1969.

    RONCALIO

    Teno (D Wyo.) March 23, 1916-—; House 1965-67, 1971-Dec. 30, 1978.

    RONCALLO

    Angelo Dominick (R N.Y.) May 28, 1927-—; House 1973-75.

    ROONEY

    Fred B. (D Pa.) Nov. 6, 1925-—; House July 30, 1963-79.

    ROONEY

    John James (D N.Y.) Nov. 29, 1903-Oct. 26, 1975; House June 6, 1944-Dec. 31, 1974.

    ROOSEVELT

    Franklin Delano Jr. (son of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, brother of James Roosevelt) (D N.Y.) Aug. 17, 1914-—; House May 17, 1949-55 (1949-51 Liberal/Four Freedoms, 1951-55 Democrat).

    ROOSEVELT

    James (son of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, brother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr.) (D Calif.) Dec. 23, 1907-—; House 1955-Sept. 30, 1965.

    ROSE

    Charles Gradison III (D N.C.) Aug. 10, 1939-—; House 1973-—.

    ROSENTHAL

    Benjamin S. (D/L N.Y.) June 8, 1923-—; House Feb. 20, 1962-—.

    ROSS

    Robert Tripp (R N.Y.) June 4, 1903-—; House 1947-49, Feb. 19, 1952-53.

    ROSTENKOWSKI

    Daniel David (Dan) (D Ill.) Jan. 2, 1928-—; House 1959-—.

    ROTH

    Tobias A. (R Wis.) Oct. 10, 1938-—; House 1979-—.

    ROTH

    William V. Jr. (R Del.) July 22, 1921-—; House 1967-Dec. 31, 1970; Senate Jan. 1, 1971-—.

    ROUDEBUSH

    Richard Lowell (R Ind.) Jan. 18, 1918-—; House 1961-71.

    ROUKEMA

    Marge (R N.J.) Sept. 19, 1929-—; House 1981-—.

    ROUSH

    John Edward (D Ind.) Sept. 12, 1920-—; House 1959-69, 1971-77.

    ROUSSELOT

    John Harbin (R Calif.) Nov. 1, 1927-—; House 1961-63, June 30, 1970-—.

    ROWAN

    William A. (D Ill.) Nov. 24, 1882-May 31, 1961; House 1943-47.

    ROY

    William Robert (D Kan.) Feb. 23, 1926-—; House 1971-75.

    ROYBAL

    Edward R. (D Calif.) Feb. 10, 1916-—; House 1963-—.

    ROYER

    William H. (R Calif.) April 11, 1920-—; House April 9, 1979-81.

    RUDD

    Eldon Dean (R Ariz.) July 15, 1920-—; House 1977-—.

    RUDMAN

    Warren (R N.H.) May 13, 1930-—; Senate Dec. 29, 1980-—.

    RUMSFELD

    Donald (R Ill.) July 9, 1932-—; House 1963-May 25, 1969; Secy. of Defense 1975-77.

    RUNNELS

    Harold Lowell (D N.M.) March 17, 1924-Aug. 5, 1980; House 1971-Aug. 5, 1980.

    RUPPE

    Philip E. (R Mich.) Sept. 29, 1926-—; House 1967-79.

    RUSSELL

    Charles Hinton (R Nev.) Dec. 27, 1903-—; House 1947-49; Gov. 1951-59.

    RUSSELL

    Donald Stuart (D S.C.) Feb. 22, 1906-—; Senate April 22, 1965-67; Gov. 1963-65.

    RUSSELL

    Richard Brevard (D Ga.) Nov. 2, 1897-Jan. 21, 1971; Senate Jan. 12, 1933-Jan. 21, 1971; Pres. pro tempore 1969-71; Gov. 1931-33.

    RUSSELL

    Sam Morris (D Texas) Aug. 9, 1889-Oct. 19, 1971; House 1941-47.

    RUSSO

    Martin Anthony (D Ill.) Jan. 23, 1944-—; House 1975-—.

    RUTH

    Earl B. (R N.C.) Feb. 7, 1916-—; House 1969-75.

    RUTHERFORD

    J. T. (D Texas) May 30, 1921-—; House 1955-63.

    RYAN

    Harold M. (D Mich.) Feb. 6, 1911-—; House Feb. 13, 1962-65.

    RYAN

    Leo Joseph (D Calif.) May 5, 1925-Nov. 18, 1978; House 1973-Nov. 18, 1978.

    RYAN

    William Fitts (D/L N.Y.) June 28, 1922-Sept. 17, 1972; House 1961-Sept. 17, 1972.

    RYTER

    John Francis (D Conn.) Feb. 4, 1914-Feb. 5, 1978; House 1945-47.

    S
    SABATH

    Adolph Joachim (D Ill.) April 4, 1866-Nov. 6, 1952; House 1907-Nov. 6, 1952.

    SABO

    Martin Olav (D Minn.) Feb. 28, 1938-—; House 1979-—.

    SADLAK

    Antoni Nicholas (R Conn.) June 13, 1908-Oct. 18, 1969; House 1947-59.

    SADOWSKI

    George Gregory (D Mich.) March 12, 1903-Oct. 9, 1961; House 1933-39, 1943-51.

    ST. GEORGE

    Katharine Price Collier (R N.Y.) July 12, 1896-—; House 1947-65.

    ST. GERMAIN

    Fernand Joseph (D R.I.) Jan. 9, 1928-—; House 1961-—.

    ST. ONGE

    William Leon (D Conn.) Oct. 9, 1914-May 1, 1970; House 1963-May 1, 1970.

    SALINGER

    Pierre Emil George (D Calif.) June 14, 1925-—; Senate Aug. 4-Dec. 31, 1964.

    SALTONSTALL

    Leverett (great-grandson of the preceding) (R Mass.) Sept. 1, 1892-June 17, 1979; Senate Jan. 4, 1945-67; Gov. 1939-45.

    SANBORN

    John Carfield (R Idaho) Sept. 28, 1885-May 16, 1968; House 1947-51.

    SANDMAN

    Charles William Jr. (R N.J.) Oct. 23, 1921-—; House 1967-75.

    SANTANGELO

    Alfred Edward (D N.Y.) June 4, 1912-March 30, 1978; House 1957-63.

    SANTINI

    James David (D Nev.) Aug. 13, 1937-—; House 1975-—.

    SARASIN

    Ronald Arthur (R Conn.) Dec. 31, 1934-—; House 1973-79.

    SARBACHER

    George William Jr. (R Pa.) Sept. 30, 1919-March 4, 1973; House 1947-49.

    SARBANES

    Paul Spyros (D Md.) Feb. 3, 1933-—; House 1971-77; Senate 1977-—.

    SASSCER

    Lansdale Ghiselin (D Md.) Sept. 30, 1893-Nov. 5, 1964; House Feb. 3, 1939-53.

    SASSER

    James Ralph (D Tenn.) Sept. 30, 1931-—; Senate 1977-—.

    SATTERFIELD

    Dave Edward Jr. (father of David Edward Satterfield III) (D Va.) Sept. 11, 1894-Dec. 27, 1946; House Nov. 2, 1937-Feb. 15, 1945.

    SATTERFIELD

    Dave Edward III (son of Dave Edward Satterfield Jr.) (D Va.) Dec. 2, 1920-—; House 1965-81.

    SAUND

    Daliph Singh (D Calif.) Sept. 20, 1899-April 22, 1973; House 1957-63.

    SAVAGE

    Charles Raymon (D Wash.) April 12, 1906-Jan. 14, 1976; House 1945-47.

    SAVAGE

    Gus (D III.) Oct. 30, 1925-—; House 1981-—.

    SAWYER

    Harold S. (R Mich.) March 21, 1920-—; House 1977-—.

    SAXBE

    William B. (R Ohio) June 24, 1916-—; Senate 1969-Jan. 3, 1974; Atty. Gen. 1974-75.

    SAYLOR

    John Phillips (R Pa.) July 23, 1908-Oct. 28, 1973; House Sept. 13, 1949-Oct. 28, 1973.

    SCHADEBERG

    Henry C. (R Wis.) Oct. 12, 1913-—; House 1961-65, 1967-71.

    SCHENCK

    Paul Fornshell (R Ohio) April 19, 1899-Nov. 30, 1968; House Nov. 6, 1951-65.

    SCHERER

    Gordon Harry (R Ohio) Dec. 26, 1906-—; House 1953-63.

    SCHERLE

    William Joseph (R Iowa) March 14, 1923-—; House 1967-75.

    SCHEUER

    James Haas (D N.Y.) Feb. 6, 1920-—; House 1965-73, 1975-—.

    SCHISLER

    Darwin Gale (D III.) March 2, 1933-—; House 1965-67.

    SCHMIDHAUSER

    John Richard (D Iowa) Jan. 3, 1922-—; House 1965-67.

    SCHMITT

    Harrison Hagan (R N.M.) July 3, 1935-—; Senate 1977-—.

    SCHMITZ

    John George (R Calif.) Aug. 12, 1930-—; House June 30, 1970-73.

    SCHNEEBELI

    Herman T. (R Pa.) July 7, 1907-—; House April 26, 1960-77.

    SCHNEIDER

    Claudine (R R.I.) March 25, 1947-—; House 1981-—.

    SCHOEPPEL

    Andrew Frank (R Kan.) Nov. 23, 1894-Jan. 21, 1962; Senate 1949-Jan. 21, 1962; Gov. 1943-47.

    SCHROEDER

    Patricia Scott (D Colo.) July 30, 1940-—; House 1973-—.

    SCHULZE

    Richard Taylor (R Pa.) Aug. 7, 1929-—; House 1975-—.

    SCHUMER

    Charles E. (D N.Y.) Nov. 23, 1951-—; House 1981-—.

    SCHWABE

    George Blaine (brother of Max Schwabe) (R Okla.) July 26, 1886-April 2, 1952; House 1945-49, 1951-April 2, 1952.

    SCHWABE

    Max (brother of George Blaine Schwabe) (R Mo.) Dec. 6, 1905-—; House 1943-49.

    SCHWEIKER

    Richard Schultz (R Pa.) June 1, 1926-—; House 1961-69; Senate 1969-81. Secy. of Health and Human Services 1981-—.

    SCHWENGEL

    Frederick Delbert (R Iowa) May 28, 1907-—; House 1955-65, 1967-73.

    SCOBLICK

    James Paul (R Pa.) May 10, 1909-—; House Nov. 5, 1946-49.

    SCOTT

    Hardie (son of John Roger Kirkpatrick Scott) (R Pa.) June 7, 1907-—; House 1947-53.

    SCOTT

    Hugh Doggett Jr. (R Pa.) Nov. 11, 1900-—; House 1941-45, 1947-59; Senate 1959-77; Chrmn. Rep. Nat. Comm. 1948-49.

    SCOTT

    Ralph James (D N.C.) Oct. 15, 1905-—; House 1957-67.

    SCOTT

    William Kerr (D N.C.) April 17, 1896-April 16, 1958; Senate Nov. 29, 1954-April 16, 1958; Gov. 1949-53.

    SCOTT

    William Lloyd (R Va.) July 1, 1915-—; House 1967-73; Senate 1973-Jan. 1, 1979.

    SCRANTON

    William Warren (R Pa.) July 19, 1917-—; House 1961-63; Gov. 1963-67.

    SCRIVNER

    Errett Power (R Kan.) March 20, 1898-May 5, 1978; House Sept. 14, 1943-59.

    SCRUGHAM

    James Graves (D Nev.) Jan. 19, 1880-June 23, 1945; House 1933-Dec. 7, 1942; Senate Dec. 7, 1942-June 23, 1945; Gov. 1923-27.

    SCUDDER

    Hubert Baxter (R Calif.) Nov. 5, 1888-July 4, 1968; House 1949-59.

    SEATON

    Frederick Andrew (R Neb.) Dec. 11, 1909-Jan. 16, 1974; Senate Dec. 10, 1951-Nov. 4, 1952; Secy. of the Interior 1956-61.

    SEBELIUS

    Keith G. (R Kan.) Sept. 10, 1916-—; House 1969-81.

    SECREST

    Robert Thompson (D Ohio) Jan. 22, 1904-—; House 1933-Aug. 3, 1942, 1949-Sept. 26, 1954, 1963-Jan. 3, 1967.

    SEELY-BROWN

    Horace Jr. (R Conn.) May 12, 1908-—; House 1947-49, 1951-59, 1961-63.

    SEIBERLING

    John Frederick (D Ohio) Sept. 8, 1918-—; House 1971-—.

    SELDEN

    Armistead Inge Jr. (D Ala.) Feb. 20, 1921-—; House 1953-69.

    SENNER

    George Frederick Jr. (D Ariz.) Nov. 24, 1921-—; House 1963-67.

    SENSENBRENNER

    Frank James Jr. (R Wis.) June 14, 1943-—; House 1979-—.

    SHAFER

    Paul Werntz (R Mich.) April 27, 1893-Aug. 17, 1954; House 1937-Aug. 17, 1954.

    SHAMANSKY

    Robert N. (D Ohio) April 18, 1927-—; House 1981-—.

    SHANNON

    James Michael (D Mass.) April 4, 1952-—; House 1979-—.

    SHARP

    Edgar Allan (R N.Y.) June 3, 1876-Nov. 27, 1948; House 1945-47.

    SHARP

    Philip Riley (D Ind.) July 15, 1942-—; House 1975-—.

    SHAW

    E. Clay (R Fla.) April 19, 1939-—; House 1981-—.

    SHEEHAN

    Timothy Patrick (R III.) Feb. 21, 1909-—; House 1951-59.

    SHELBY

    Richard Craig (D Ala.) May 6, 1934-—; House 1979-—.

    SHELLEY

    John Francis (D Calif.) Sept. 3, 1905-Sept. 1, 1974; House Nov. 8, 1949-Jan. 7, 1964.

    SHEPPARD

    Harry Richard (D Calif.) Jan. 10, 1885-April 28, 1969; House 1937-65.

    SHERIDAN

    John Edward (D Pa.) Sept. 15, 1902-—; House Nov. 7, 1939-47.

    SHIPLEY

    George Edward (D III.) April 21, 1927-—; House 1959-79.

    SHIPSTEAD

    Henrik (R Minn.) Jan. 8, 1881-June 26, 1960; Senate 1923-47 (1923-41 Farmer Laborite, 1941-47 Republican).

    SHORT

    Dewey Jackson (R Mo.) April 7, 1898-Nov. 19, 1979; House 1929-31, 1935-57.

    SHORT

    Don Levingston (R N.D.) June 22, 1903-—; House 1959-65.

    SHOUP

    Richard Garner (grandson of George Laird Shoup) (R Mont.) Nov. 29, 1923-—; House 1971-75.

    SHRIVER

    Garner E. (R Kan.) July 6, 1912-—; House 1961-77.

    SHUFORD

    George Adams (D N.C.) Sept. 5, 1895-Dec. 8, 1962; House 1953-59.

    SHUMWAY

    Norman David (R Calif.) July 28, 1934-—; House 1979-—.

    SHUSTER

    E. G. (Bud) (R Pa.) Jan. 23, 1932-—; House 1973-—.

    SIBAL

    Abner Woodruff (R Conn.) April 11, 1921-—; House 1961-65.

    SICKLES

    Carlton R. (D Md.) June 15, 1921-—; House 1963-67.

    SIEMINSKI

    Alfred Dennis (D N.J.) Aug. 23, 1911-—; House 1951-59.

    SIKES

    Robert Louis Fulton (D Fla.) June 3, 1906-—; House 1941-Oct. 19, 1944, 1945-79.

    SILER

    Eugene (R Ky.) June 26, 1900-—; House 1955-65.

    SILJANDER

    Mark (R Mich.) June 11, 1951-—; House April 28, 1981-—.

    SIMON

    Paul Martin (D III.) Nov. 29, 1928-—; House 1975-—.

    SIMPSON

    Alan Kooi (R Wyo.) Sept. 2, 1931-—; Senate Jan. 1, 1979-—.

    SIMPSON

    Edna Oakes (widow of Sidney Elmer Simpson) (R Ill.) Oct. 28, 1891-—; House 1959-61.

    SIMPSON

    Milward Lee (R Wyo.) Nov. 12, 1897-—; Senate Nov. 7, 1962-67; Gov. 1955-59.

    SIMPSON

    Richard Murray (R Pa.) Aug. 30, 1900-Jan. 7, 1960; House May 11, 1937-Jan. 7, 1960.

    SIMPSON

    Sidney Elmer (Sid) (husband of Edna Oakes Simpson) (R Ill.) Sept. 20, 1894-Oct. 26, 1958; House 1943-Oct. 26, 1958.

    SIMS

    Hugo Sheridan Jr. (D S.C.) Oct. 14, 1921-—; House 1949-51.

    SISK

    Bernice Frederic (D Calif.) Dec. 14, 1910-—; House 1955-79.

    SITTLER

    Edward Lewis Jr. (R Pa.) April 21, 1908-Dec. 26, 1978; House 1951-53.

    SKEEN

    Joseph R. (R N.M.) June 30, 1927-—; House 1981-—.

    SKELTON

    Ike N. (D Mo.) Dec. 20, 1931-—; House 1977-—.

    SKUBITZ

    Joe (R Kan.) May 6, 1906-—; House 1963-Dec. 31, 1978.

    SLACK

    John Mark Jr. (D W.Va.) March 18, 1915-March 17, 1980; House 1959-March 17, 1980.

    SLAUGHTER

    Roger Caldwell (D Mo.) July 17, 1905-June 2, 1974; House 1943-47.

    SMALL

    Frank Jr. (R Md.) July 15, 1896-Oct. 24, 1973; House 1953-55.

    SMATHERS

    George Armistead (nephew of William Howell Smathers) (D Fla.) Nov. 14, 1913-—; House 1947-51; Senate 1951-69.

    SMITH

    Albert Lee (R Ala.) Aug. 31, 1931-—; House 1981-—.

    SMITH

    Benjamin A. II (D Mass.) March 26, 1916-—; Senate Dec. 27, 1960-Nov. 7, 1962.

    SMITH

    Christopher H. (R N.J.) March 4, 1953-—; House 1981-—.

    SMITH

    Denny (R Ore.) Jan. 19, 1938-—; House 1981-—.

    SMITH

    Frank Ellis (D Miss.) Feb. 21, 1918-—; House 1951-Nov. 14, 1962.

    SMITH

    Frederick Cleveland (R Ohio) July 29, 1844-July 16, 1956; House 1939-51.

    SMITH

    H. Allen (R Calif.) Oct. 8, 1909-—; House 1957-73.

    SMITH

    Henry P. III (R N.Y.) Sept. 29, 1911-—; House 1965-75.

    SMITH

    Howard Alexander (uncle of Peter H. Dominick) (R N.J.) Jan. 30, 1880-Oct. 27, 1966; Senate Dec. 7, 1944-59.

    SMITH

    Howard Worth (D Va.) Feb. 2, 1883-Oct. 3, 1976; House 1931-67.

    SMITH

    James Vernon (R Okla.) July 23, 1926-June 23, 1973; House 1967-69.

    SMITH

    Lawrence Henry (R Wis.) Sept. 15, 1892-Jan. 22, 1958; House Aug. 29, 1941-Jan. 22, 1958.

    SMITH

    Margaret Chase (widow of Clyde Harold Smith) (R Maine) Dec. 14, 1897-—; House June 3, 1940-49; Senate 1949-73.

    SMITH

    Neal Edward (D Iowa) March 23, 1920-—; House 1959-—.

    SMITH

    Ralph Tyler (R Ill.) Oct. 6, 1915-Aug. 13, 1972; Senate Sept. 17, 1969-Nov. 3, 1970.

    SMITH

    Virginia Dodd (R Neb.) June 30, 1911-—; House 1975-—.

    SMITH

    Willis (D N.C.) Dec. 19, 1887-June 26, 1953; Senate Nov. 27, 1950-June 26, 1953.

    SMITH

    Wint (R Kan.) Oct. 7, 1892-April 27, 1976; House 1947-61.

    SNOWE

    Olympia Jean Bouchles (R Maine) Feb. 21, 1947-—; House 1979-—.

    SNYDER

    John Buell (D Pa.) July 30, 1877-Feb. 24, 1946; House 1933-Feb. 24, 1946.

    SNYDER

    Marion Gene (R Ky.) Jan. 26, 1928-—; House 1963-65, 1967-—.

    SNYDER

    Melvin Claude (R W.Va.) Oct. 29, 1898-—; House 1947-49.

    SOLARZ

    Stephen Joshua (D N.Y.) Sept. 12, 1940-—; House 1975-—.

    SOLOMON

    Gerald B. (R N.Y.) Aug. 14, 1930-—; House 1979-—.

    SOMERS

    Andrew Lawrence (D N.Y.) March 21, 1895-April 6, 1949; House 1925-April 6, 1949.

    SPARKMAN

    John Jackson (D Ala.) Dec. 20, 1899-—; House 1937-Nov. 5, 1946; Senate Nov. 6, 1946-79.

    SPECTER

    Arlen (R Pa.) Feb. 12, 1930-—; Senate 1981-—.

    SPELLMAN

    Gladys Noon (D Md.) March 1, 1918-—; House 1975-Feb. 24, 1981.

    SPENCE

    Brent (D Ky.) Dec. 24, 1874-Sept. 18, 1967; House 1931-63.

    SPENCE

    Floyd Davidson (R S.C.) April 9, 1928-—; House 1971-—.

    SPONG

    William Belser Jr. (D Va.) Sept. 29, 1920-—; Senate Dec. 31, 1966-73.

    SPRINGER

    Raymond Smiley (R Ind.) April 26, 1882-Aug. 28, 1947; House 1939-Aug. 28, 1947.

    SPRINGER

    William Lee (R Ill.) April 12, 1909-—; House 1951-73.

    STACK

    Edward John (D Fla.) April 29, 1910-—; House 1979-81.

    STAEBLER

    Neil (D Mich.) July 11, 1905-—; House 1963-65.

    STAFFORD

    Robert Theodore (R Vt.) Aug. 8, 1913-—; House 1961-Sept. 16, 1971; Senate Sept. 16, 1971-—; Gov. 1959-61.

    STAGGERS

    Harley Orrin (D W.Va.) Aug. 3, 1907-—; House 1949-81.

    STALBAUM

    Lynn Ellsworth (D Wis.) May 15, 1920-—; House 1965-67.

    STANFIL

    William Abner (R Ky.) Jan. 16, 1892-—; Senate Nov. 19, 1945-Nov. 5, 1946.

    STANGELAND

    Arlan Ingehart (R Minn.) Feb. 8, 1930-—; House March 1, 1977-—.

    STANLEY

    Thomas Bahnson (D Va.) July 16, 1890-July 10, 1970; House Nov. 5, 1946-Feb. 3, 1953; Gov. 1954-58.

    STANTON

    James Vincent (D Ohio) Feb. 27, 1932-—; House 1971-77.

    STANTON

    John William (R Ohio) Feb. 20, 1924-—; House 1965-—.

    STARK

    Fortney Hillman (D Calif.) Nov. 11, 1931-—; House 1973-—.

    STARKEY

    Frank Thomas (D Minn.) Feb. 18, 1892-May 14, 1968; House 1945-47.

    STATON

    David Mick (R W. Va.) Feb. 11, 1940-—; House 1981-—.

    STAUFFER

    Simon Walter (R Pa.) Aug. 13, 1888-Sept. 26, 1975; House 1953-55, 1957-59.

    STEED

    Thomas Jefferson (D Okla.) March 2, 1904-—; House 1949-81.

    STEELE

    Robert Hampton (R Conn.) Nov. 3, 1938-—; House Nov. 3, 1970-75.

    STEELMAN

    Alan Watson (R Texas) March 15, 1942-—; House 1973-77.

    STEERS

    Newton Ivan Jr. (R Md.) Jan 13, 1917-—; House 1977-79.

    STEFAN

    Karl (R Neb.) March 1, 1884-Oct. 2, 1951; House 1935-Oct. 2, 1951.

    STEIGER

    Sam (R Ariz.) March 10, 1929-—; House 1967-77.

    STEIGER

    William Albert (R Wis.) May 15, 1938-Dec. 4, 1978; House 1967-Dec. 4, 1978.

    STENHOLM

    Charles Walter (D Texas) Oct. 26, 1938-—; House 1979-—.

    STENNIS

    John Cornelius (D Miss.) Aug 3, 1901-—; Senate Nov. 5, 1947-—.

    STEPHENS

    Robert Grier Jr. (great-great-nephew of Alexander Hamilton Stephens) (D Ga.) Aug. 14, 1913-—; House 1961-77.

    STEVENS

    Theodore F. (Ted) (R Alaska) Nov. 18, 1923-—; Senate Dec. 24, 1968-—.

    STEVENSON

    Adlai Ewing III (great-grandson of Adlai Ewing Stevenson) (D Ill.) Oct. 10, 1930-—; Senate Nov. 17, 1970-81.

    STEVENSON

    William Henry (R Wis.) Sept. 23, 1891-March 19, 1978; House 1941-49.

    STEWART

    Arthur Thomas (Tom) (D Tenn.) Jan. 11, 1892-Oct. 10, 1972; Senate Jan. 16, 1939-49.

    STEWART

    Bennett McVey (D Ill.) Aug. 6, 1915-—; House 1979-81.

    STEWART

    Donald Wilbur (D Ala.) Feb. 8, 1940-—; Senate Nov. 8, 1978-81.

    STEWART

    Paul (D Okla.) Feb. 27, 1892-Nov. 13, 1950; House 1943-47.

    STIGLER

    William Grady (D Okla.) July 7, 1891-Aug. 21, 1952; House March 28, 1944-Aug. 21, 1952.

    STINSON

    K. William (Bill) (R Wash.) April 20, 1930-—; House 1963-65.

    STOCKMAN

    David Alan (R Mich.) Nov. 10, 1946-—; House 1977-81; Director, Office of Management and Budget 1981-—.

    STOCKMAN

    Lowell (R Ore.) April 12, 1901-Aug. 10, 1962; House 1943-53.

    STOKES

    Louis (D Ohio) Feb. 23, 1925-—; House 1969-—.

    STONE

    Richard Bernard (D Fla.) Sept. 22, 1928-—; Senate Jan. 1, 1975-Dec. 31, 1980.

    STRATTON

    Samuel Studdiford (D N.Y.) Sept. 27, 1916-—; House 1959-—.

    STRATTON

    William Grant (R Ill.) Feb. 26, 1914-—; House 1941-43, 1947-49; Gov. 1953-61.

    STRINGFELLOW

    Douglas (R Utah) Sept. 24, 1922-Oct. 19, 1966; House 1953-55.

    STUBBLEFIELD

    Frank Albert (D Ky.) April 5, 1907-Oct. 14, 1977; House 1959-Dec. 31, 1974.

    STUCKEY

    Williamson Sylvester Jr. (D Ga.) May 25, 1935-—; House 1967-77.

    STUDDS

    Gerry Eastman (D Mass.) May 12, 1937-—; House 1973-—.

    STUMP

    Robert (D Ariz.) April 4, 1927-—; House 1977-—.

    SULLIVAN

    John Berchmans (husband of Leonor Kretzer Sullivan) (D Mo.) Oct. 10, 1897-Jan. 29, 1951; House 1941-43, 1945-47, 1949-Jan. 29, 1951.

    SULLIVAN

    Leonor Kretzer (widow of John Berchmans Sullivan) (D Mo.) Aug. 21, 1903-—; House 1953-77.

    SUMNER

    Jessie (R Ill.) July 17, 1898-—; House 1939-47.

    SUMNERS

    Hatton William (D Texas) May 30, 1875-April 19, 1962; House 1913-47.

    SUNDSTROM

    Frank Leander (R N.J.) Jan. 5, 1901-May 23, 1980; House 1943-49.

    SUTTON

    James Patrick (Pat) (D Tenn.) Oct. 31, 1915-—; House 1949-55.

    SWEENEY

    Robert E. (son of Martin Leonard Sweeney) (D Ohio) Nov. 4, 1924-—; House 1965-67.

    SWIFT

    Allen (D Wash.) Sept. 12, 1935-—; House 1979-—.

    SWIFT

    George Robinson (D Ala.) Dec. 19, 1887-Sept. 10, 1972; Senate June 15-Nov. 5, 1946.

    SYMINGTON

    James Wadsworth (son of William Stuart Symington) (D Mo.) Sept. 28, 1927-—; House 1969-77.

    SYMINGTON

    William Stuart (father of James Wadsworth Symington) (D Mo.) June 26, 1901-—; Senate 1953-Dec. 27, 1976.

    SYMMS

    Steven Douglas (R Idaho) April 23, 1938-—; House 1973-81; Senate 1981-—.

    SYNAR

    Michael Lynn (D Okla.) Oct. 17, 1950-—; House 1979-—.

    T
    TABER

    John (R N.Y.) May 5, 1880-Nov. 22, 1965; House 1923-63.

    TACKETT

    Boyd (D Ark.) May 9, 1911-—; House 1949-53.

    TAFT

    Kingsley Arter (R Ohio) July 19, 1903-March 28, 1970; Senate Nov. 5, 1946-47.

    TAFT

    Robert Alphonso (son of President William Howard Taft, father of Robert Taft Jr., nephew of Charles Phelps Taft) (R Ohio) Sept. 8, 1889-July 31, 1953; Senate 1939-July 31, 1953.

    TAFT

    Robert Jr. (son of Robert Alphonso Taft, grandson of President William Howard Taft, grandnephew of Charles Phelps Taft) (R Ohio) Feb. 26, 1917-—; House 1963-65, 1967-71; Senate 1971-Dec. 28, 1976.

    TALBOT

    Joseph Edward (R Conn.) March 18, 1901-April 30, 1966; House Jan. 20, 1942-47.

    TALCOTT

    Burt L. (R Calif.) Feb. 22, 1920-—; House 1963-77.

    TALLE

    Henry Oscar (R Iowa) Jan. 12, 1892-March 14, 1969; House 1939-59.

    TALMADGE

    Herman Eugene (D Ga.) Aug. 9, 1913-—; Senate 1957-81; Gov. 1947, 1948-55.

    TARVER

    Malcolm Connor (D Ga.) Sept. 25, 1885-March 5, 1960; House 1927-47.

    TAUKE

    Thomas Joseph (R Iowa) Oct. 11, 1950-—; House 1979-—.

    TAURIELLO

    Anthony Francis (D N.Y.) Aug. 14, 1899-—; House 1949-51.

    TAUZIN

    W.J. (Billy) (D La.) June 14, 1943-—; House May 22, 1980-—.

    TAYLOR

    Dean Park (R N.Y.) Jan. 1, 1902-Oct. 16, 1977; House 1943-61.

    TAYLOR

    Gene (R Mo.) Feb. 10, 1928-—; House 1973-—.

    TAYLOR

    Glen Hearst (D Idaho) April 12, 1904-—; Senate 1945-51.

    TAYLOR

    Roy Arthur (D N.C.) Jan. 31, 1910-—; House June 25, 1960-77.

    TEAGUE

    Charles McKevett (R Calif.) Sept. 18, 1909-Jan. 1, 1974; House 1955-Jan. 1, 1974.

    TEAGUE

    Olin Earl (D Texas) April 6, 1910-Jan. 23, 1981; House Aug. 24, 1946-Dec. 31, 1978.

    TELLER

    Ludwig (D N.Y.) June 22, 1911-Oct. 4, 1965; House 1957-61.

    TENZER

    Herbert (D N.Y.) Nov. 1, 1905-—; House 1965-69.

    TERRY

    John H. (R N.Y.) Nov. 14, 1924-—; House 1971-73.

    TEWES

    Donald Edgar (R Wis.) Aug. 4, 1916-—; House 1957-59.

    THOM

    William Richard (D Ohio) July 7, 1885-Aug. 28, 1960; House 1933-39, 1941-43, 1945-47.

    THOMAS

    Albert (husband of Lera M. Thomas) (D Texas) April 12, 1898-Feb. 15, 1966; House 1937-Feb. 15, 1966.

    THOMAS

    Elbert Duncan (D Utah) June 17, 1883-Feb. 11, 1953; Senate 1933-51.

    THOMAS

    John (R Idaho) Jan. 4, 1874-Nov. 10, 1945; Senate June 30, 1928-33, Jan. 27, 1940-Nov. 10, 1945.

    THOMAS

    John Parnell (R N.J.) Jan. 16, 1895-Nov. 19, 1970; House 1937-Jan. 2, 1950.

    THOMAS

    John William Elmer (D Okla.) Sept. 8, 1876-Sept. 19, 1965; House 1923-27; Senate 1927-51.

    THOMAS

    Lera M. (widow of Albert Thomas) (D Texas) Aug. 3, 1900-—; House March 30, 1966-67.

    THOMAS

    William Marshall (R Calif.) Dec. 6, 1941-—; House 1979-—.

    THOMASON

    Robert Ewing (D Texas) May 30, 1879-Nov. 8, 1973; House 1931-July 31, 1947.

    THOMPSON

    Clark Wallace (D Texas) Aug. 6, 1896-—; House June 24, 1933-35, Aug. 23, 1947-Dec. 30, 1966.

    THOMPSON

    Frank Jr. (D N.J.) July 26, 1918-—; House 1955-81.

    THOMPSON

    Ruth (R Mich.) Sept. 15, 1887-April 5, 1970; House 1951-57.

    THOMPSON

    Standish Fletcher (R Ga.) Feb. 5, 1925-—; House 1967-73.

    THOMPSON

    Theo Ashton (D La.) March 31, 1916-July 1, 1965; House 1953-July 1, 1965.

    THOMSON

    Edwin Keith (R Wyo) Feb. 8, 1919-Dec. 9, 1960; House 1955-Dec. 9, 1960.

    THOMSON

    Vernon Wallace (R Wis.) Nov. 5, 1905-—; House 1961-Dec. 31, 1974; Gov. 1957-59.

    THONE

    Charles (R Neb.) Jan. 4, 1924-—; House 1971-79.

    THORNBERRY

    William Homer (D Texas) Jan. 9, 1909-—; House 1949-Dec. 20, 1963.

    THORNTON

    Raymond Hoyt Jr. (D Ark.) July 16, 1928-—; House 1973-79.

    THURMOND

    James Strom (R S.C.) Dec. 5, 1902-—; Senate Dec. 24, 1954-April 4, 1956, Nov. 7, 1956-—; Pres. pro tempore 1981-—. Gov. 1947-51 (1947-51, 1954-56, 1956-Sept. 16, 1964 Democrat, Sept. 16, 1964-—Republican).

    THYE

    Edward John (R Minn.) April 26, 1896-Aug. 28, 1969; Senate 1947-59; Gov. 1943-47.

    TIBBOTT

    Harve (R Pa.) May 27, 1885-Dec. 31, 1969; House 1939-49.

    TIERNAN

    Robert Owens (D R.I.) Feb. 24, 1929-—; House March 28, 1967-75.

    TOBEY

    Charles William (R N.H.) July 22, 1880-July 24, 1953; House 1933-39; Senate 1939-July 24, 1953; Gov. 1929-31.

    TODD

    Paul Harold Jr. (D Mich.) Sept. 22, 1921-—; House 1965-67.

    TOLAN

    John Harvey (D Calif.) Jan. 15, 1877-June 30, 1947; House 1937-47.

    TOLL

    Herman (D Pa.) March 15, 1907-July 26, 1967; House 1959-67.

    TOLLEFSON

    Thor Carl (R Wash.) May 2, 1901-—; House 1947-65.

    TONRY

    Richard Alvin (D La.) June 25, 1935-—; House 1977-—.

    TORRENS

    James H. (D N.Y.) Sept. 12, 1874-April 5, 1952; House Feb. 29, 1944-47.

    TOWE

    Harry Lancaster (R N.J.) Nov. 3, 1898-—; House 1943-Sept. 7, 1951.

    TOWELL

    David Gilmer (R Nev.) June 9, 1937-—; House 1973-75.

    TOWER

    John Goodwin (R Texas) Sept. 29, 1925-—; Senate June 15, 1961-—.

    TRAXLER

    Jerome Bob (D Mich.) July 21, 1931-—; House April 16, 1974-—.

    TRAYNOR

    Philip Andrew (D Del.) May 31, 1874-Dec. 5, 1962; House 1941-43, 1945-47.

    TREEN

    David Conner (R La.) July 16, 1928-—; House 1973-—.

    TRIBLE

    Paul Seward Jr. (R Va.) Dec. 29, 1946-—; House 1977-—.

    TRIMBLE

    James William (D Ark.) Feb. 3, 1894-March 10, 1972; House 1945-67.

    TRUMAN

    Harry S (D Mo.) May 8, 1884-Dec. 26, 1972; Senate 1935-Jan. 17, 1945; Vice Pres. Jan. 20-April 12, 1945; President April 12, 1945-53.

    TSONGAS

    Paul Efthemios (D Mass.) Feb. 14, 1941-—; House 1975-79; Senate 1979-—.

    TUCK

    William Munford (D Va.) Sept. 28, 1896-—; House April 14, 1953-69; Gov. 1946-50.

    TUCKER

    James Guy (D Ark.) June 13, 1943-—; House 1977-79.

    TUMULTY

    Thomas James (D N.J.) March 2, 1913-—; House 1955-57.

    TUNNELL

    James Miller (D Del.) Aug. 2, 1879-Nov. 14, 1957; Senate 1941-47.

    TUNNEY

    John Varick (D Calif.) June 26, 1934-—; House 1965-Jan. 2, 1971; Senate Jan. 2, 1971-Jan. 1, 1977.

    TUPPER

    Stanley Roger (R Maine) Jan. 25, 1921-—; House 1961-67.

    TUTEN

    James Russell (D Ga.) July 23, 1911-Aug. 16, 1968; House 1963-67.

    TWYMAN

    Robert Joseph (R Ill.) June 18, 1897-June 28, 1976; House 1947-49.

    TYDINGS

    Joseph Davies (son of Millard Evelyn Tydings) (D Md.) May 4, 1928-—; Senate 1965-71.

    TYDINGS

    Millard Evelyn (father of Joseph Davies Tydings) (D Md.) April 6, 1890-Feb. 9, 1961; House 1923-27; Senate 1927-51.

    U
    UDALL

    Morris King (brother of Stewart Lee Udall) (D Ariz.) June 15, 1922-—; House May 2, 1961-—.

    UDALL

    Stewart Lee (brother of Morris King Udall) (D Ariz.) Jan. 31, 1920-—; House 1955-Jan. 18, 1961; Secy. of the Interior 1961-69.

    ULLMAN

    Albert Conrad (D Ore.) March 9, 1914-—; House 1957-81.

    UMSTEAD

    William Bradley (D N.C.) May 13, 1895-Nov. 7, 1954; House 1933-39; Senate Dec. 18, 1946-Dec. 30, 1948; Gov. 1953-54.

    UNDERWOOD

    Thomas Rust (D Ky.) March 3, 1898-June 29, 1956; House 1949-March 17, 1951; Senate March 19, 1951-Nov. 4, 1952.

    UPTON

    Robert William (R N.H.) Feb. 3, 1884-April 28, 1972; Senate Aug. 14, 1953-Nov. 7, 1954.

    UTT

    James Boyd (R Calif.) March 11, 1899-March 1, 1970; House 1953-March 1, 1970.

    V
    VAIL

    Richard Bernard (R Ill.) Aug. 31, 1895-July 29, 1955; House 1947-49, 1951-53.

    VAN DEERLIN

    Lionel (D Calif.) July 25, 1914-—; House 1963-81.

    VANDENBERG

    Arthur Hendrick (R Mich.) March 22, 1884-April 18, 1951; Senate March 31, 1928-April 18, 1951; Pres. pro tempore 1947-49.

    VANDER JAGT

    Guy Adrian (R Mich.) Aug. 26, 1931-—; House Nov. 8, 1966-—.

    VANDER VEEN

    Richard Franklin (D Mich.) Nov. 26, 1922-—; House Feb. 18, 1974-77.

    VANIK

    Charles Albert (D Ohio) April 7, 1913-—; House 1955-81.

    VAN PELT

    William Kaiser (R Wis.) March 10, 1905-—; House 1951-65.

    VAN ZANDT

    James Edward (R Pa.) Dec. 18, 1898-—; House 1939-Sept. 24, 1943, 1947-63.

    VAUGHN

    Albert Clinton Sr. (R Pa.) Oct. 9, 1894-Sept. 1, 1951; House Jan. 3-Sept. 1, 1951.

    VELDE

    Harold Himmel (R Ill.) April 1, 1910-—; House 1949-57.

    VENTO

    Bruce Frank (D Minn.) Oct. 7, 1940-—; House 1977-—.

    VEYSEY

    Victor V. (R Calif.) April 14, 1915-—; House 1971-75.

    VIGORITO

    Joseph Phillip (D Pa.) Nov. 10, 1918-—; House 1965-77.

    VINSON

    Carl (D Ga.) Nov. 18, 1883-June 1, 1981; House Nov. 3, 1914-65.

    VIVIAN

    Weston Edward (D Mich.) Oct. 25, 1924-—; House 1965-67.

    VOLKMER

    Harold Lee (D Mo.) April 4, 1931-—; House 1977-—.

    VOORHIS

    Horace Jerry (D Calif.) April 6, 1901-—; House 1937-47.

    VORYS

    John Martin (R Ohio) June 16, 1896-Aug. 25, 1968; House 1939-59.

    VURSELL

    Charles Wesley (R Ill.) Feb. 8, 1881-Sept. 21, 1974; House 1943-59.

    W
    WADSWORTH

    James Wolcott Jr. (R N.Y.) Aug. 12, 1877-June 21, 1952; Senate 1915-27; House 1933-51.

    WAGGONNER

    Joseph David Jr. (D La.) Sept. 7, 1918-—; House Dec. 19, 1961-79.

    WAGNER

    Earl Thomas (D Ohio) April 27, 1908-—; House 1949-51.

    WAGNER

    Robert Ferdinand (D N.Y.) June 8, 1877-May 4, 1953; Senate 1927-June 28, 1949.

    WAINWRIGHT

    Stuyvesant II (R N.Y.) March 16, 1921-—; House 1953-61.

    WALDIE

    Jerome Russell (D Calif.) Feb. 15, 1925-—; House June 7, 1966-75.

    WALGREN

    Douglas (D Pa.) Dec. 28, 1940-—; House 1977-—.

    WALKER

    E. S. Johnny (D N.M.) June 18, 1911-—; House 1965-69.

    WALKER

    Prentiss Lafayette (R Miss.) Aug. 23, 1917-—; House 1965-67.

    WALKER

    Robert Smith (R Pa.) Dec. 23, 1942-—; House 1977-—.

    WALLGREN

    Monrad Charles (D Wash.) April 17, 1891-Sept. 18, 1961; House 1933-Dec. 19, 1940; Senate Dec. 19, 1940-Jan. 9, 1945; Gov. 1945-49.

    WALLHAUSER

    George Marvin (R N.J.) Feb. 10, 1900-—; House 1959-65.

    WALLOP

    Malcolm (R Wyo.) Feb. 27, 1933-—; Senate 1977-—.

    WALSH

    David Ignatious (D Mass.) Nov. 11, 1872-June 11, 1947; Senate 1919-25, Dec. 6, 1926-47; Gov. 1914-16.

    WALSH

    John Richard (D Ind.) May 22, 1913-—; House 1949-51.

    WALSH

    William Francis (R N.Y.) July 11, 1912-—; House 1973-79.

    WALTER

    Francis Eugene (D Pa.) May 26, 1894-May 31, 1963; House 1933-May 31, 1963.

    WALTERS

    Herbert Sanford (D Tenn.) Nov. 17, 1891-Aug. 17, 1973; Senate Aug. 20, 1963-Nov. 3, 1964.

    WAMPLER

    Fred (D Ind.) Oct. 15, 1909-—; House 1959-61.

    WAMPLER

    William Creed (R Va.) April 21, 1926-—; House 1953-55, 1967-—.

    WARBURTON

    Herbert Birchby (R Del.) Sept. 21, 1916-—; House 1953-55.

    WARE

    John Haines III (R Pa.) Aug. 29, 1908-—; House Nov. 3, 1970-1975.

    WARNER

    John William (R Va.) Feb. 18, 1927-—; Senate Jan. 2, 1979-—.

    WASHINGTON

    Harold (D Ill.) April 15, 1922-—; House 1981-—.

    WASIELEWSKI

    Thaddeus Francis Boleslaw (D Wis.) Dec. 2, 1904-April 25, 1976; House 1941-47.

    WATKINS

    Arthur Vivian (R Utah) Dec. 18, 1886-Sept. 1, 1973; Senate 1947-59.

    WATKINS

    George Robert (R Pa.) May 21, 1902-Aug. 7, 1970; House 1965-Aug. 7, 1970.

    WATKINS

    Wesley Wade (D Okla.) Dec. 15, 1938-—; House 1977-—.

    WATSON

    Albert William (R S.C.) Aug. 30, 1922-—; House 1963-Feb. 1, 1965, June 15, 1965-71 (1963-65 Democrat, 1965-71 Republican).

    WATTS

    John Clarence (D Ky.) July 9, 1902-Sept. 24, 1971; House April 14, 1951-Sept. 24, 1971.

    WAXMAN

    Henry Arnold (D Calif.) Sept. 12, 1939-—; House 1975-—.

    WEAVER

    James Dorman (R Pa.) Sept. 27, 1920-—; House 1963-65.

    WEAVER

    James Howard (D Ore.) Aug. 8, 1927-—; House 1975-—.

    WEAVER

    Phillip Hart (grandson of Archibald Jerard Weaver) (R Neb.) April 9, 1919-—; House 1955-63.

    WEAVER

    Zebulon (D. N.C.) May 12, 1872-Oct. 29, 1948; House 1917-March 1, 1919, March 4, 1919-29, 1931-47.

    WEBER

    Ed (R Ohio) July 26, 1931-—; House 1981-—.

    WEBER

    Vin (R Minn.) July 24, 1952-—; House 1981-—.

    WEICHEL

    Alvin F. (R Ohio) Sept. 11, 1891-Nov. 27, 1956; House 1943-55.

    WEICKER

    Lowell Palmer Jr. (R Conn.) May 16, 1931-—; House 1969-71; Senate 1971-—.

    WEIS

    Jessica McCullough (R N.Y.) July 8, 1901-May 1, 1963; House 1959-63.

    WEISS

    Samuel Arthur (D Pa.) April 15, 1902-Feb. 1, 1977; House 1941-Jan. 7, 1946.

    WEISS

    Theodore S. (D N.Y.) Sept. 17, 1927-—; House 1977-—.

    WELCH

    Philip James (D Mo.) April 4, 1895-April 26, 1963; House 1949-53.

    WELCH

    Richard Joseph (R Calif.) Feb. 13, 1869-Sept. 10, 1949, House Aug. 31, 1926-Sept. 10, 1949.

    WELKER

    Herman (R Idaho) Dec. 11, 1906-Oct. 30, 1957; Senate 1951-57.

    WELTNER

    Charles Longstreet (D Ga.) Dec. 17, 1927-—; House 1963-67.

    WERDEL

    Thomas Harold (R Calif.) Sept. 13, 1905-Sept. 30, 1966; House 1949-53.

    WEST

    Milton Horace (D Texas) June 30, 1888-Oct. 28, 1948; House April 22, 1933-Oct. 28, 1948.

    WESTLAND

    Aldred John (Jack) (R Wash.) Dec. 14, 1904-—; House 1953-65.

    WHALEN

    Charles William Jr. (R Ohio) July 31, 1920-—; House 1967-79.

    WHALLEY

    John Irving (R Pa.) Sept. 14, 1902-March 8, 1980; House Nov. 8, 1960-73.

    WHARTON

    James Ernest (R N.Y.) Oct. 4, 1899-—; House 1951-65.

    WHEELER

    Burton Kendall (D Mont.) Feb. 27, 1882-Jan. 6, 1975; Senate 1923-47.

    WHEELER

    William McDonald (D Ga.) July 11, 1915-—; House 1947-55.

    WHERRY

    Kenneth Spicer (R Neb.) Feb. 28, 1892-Nov. 29, 1951; Senate 1943-Nov. 29, 1951.

    WHITAKER

    John Albert (grandson of Addison Davis James) (D Ky.) Oct. 31, 1901-Dec. 15, 1951; House April 17, 1948-Dec. 15, 1951.

    WHITE

    Cecil Fielding (D Calif.) Dec. 12, 1900-—; House 1949-51.

    WHITE

    Compton Ignatius (father of Compton Ignatius White Jr.) (D Idaho) July 31, 1877-March 31, 1956; House 1933-47, 1949-51.

    WHITE

    Compton Ignatius Jr. (son of Compton Ignatius White) (D Idaho) Dec. 19, 1920-—; House 1963-67.

    WHITE

    Richard Crawford (D Texas) April 29, 1923-—; House 1965-—.

    WHITE

    Wallace Humphrey Jr. (grandson of William Pierce Frye) (R Maine) Aug. 6, 1877-March 31, 1952; House 1917-31; Senate 1931-49.

    WHITEHURST

    George William (R Va.) March 12, 1925-—; House 1969-—.

    WHITENER

    Basil Lee (D N.C.) May 14, 1915-—; House 1957-69.

    WHITLEY

    Charles Orville (D N.C.) Jan. 3, 1927-—; House 1977-—.

    WHITTAKER

    Robert (R Kan.) Sept. 18, 1939-—; House 1979-—.

    WHITTEN

    Jamie Lloyd (D Miss.) April 18, 1910-—; House Nov. 4, 1941-—.

    WHITTINGTON

    William Madison (D Miss.) May 4, 1878-Aug. 20, 1962; House 1925-51.

    WICKERSHAM

    Victor Eugene (D Okla.) Feb. 9, 1906-—; House April 1, 1941-47, 1949-57, 1961-65.

    WIDNALL

    William Beck (R N.J.) March 17, 1906-—; House Feb. 6, 1950-Dec. 31, 1974.

    WIER

    Roy William (D Minn.) Feb. 25, 1888-June 27, 1963; House 1949-61.

    WIGGINS

    Charles Edward (R Calif.) Dec. 3, 1927-—; House 1967-79.

    WIGGLESWORTH

    Richard Bowditch (R Mass.) April 25, 1891-Oct. 22, 1960; House Nov. 6, 1928-Nov. 13, 1958.

    WILEY

    Alexander (R Wis.) May 26, 1884-May 26 1967; Senate 1939-63.

    WILLIAMS

    Harrison Arlington Jr. (D N.J.) Dec. 10, 1919-—; House Nov. 3, 1953-57; Senate 1959-—.

    WILLIAMS

    John Bell (D Miss.) Dec. 4, 1918-—; House 1947-Jan. 16, 1968; Gov. 1968-72.

    WILLIAMS

    John James (R Del.) May 17, 1904-—; Senate 1947-Dec. 31, 1970.

    WILLIAMS

    Lawrence Gordon (R Pa.) Sept. 15, 1913-July 13, 1975; House 1967-75.

    WILLIAMS

    Lyle (R Ohio) Aug. 23, 1942-—; House 1979-—.

    WILLIAMS

    Pat (D Mont.) Oct. 30, 1937-—; House 1979-—.

    WILLIAMS

    William Robert (R N.Y.) Aug. 11, 1884-May 9, 1972; House 1951-59.

    WILLIS

    Edwin Edward (D La.) Oct 2, 1904-Oct. 24, 1972; House 1949-69.

    WILLIS

    Raymond Eugene (R Ind.) Aug. 11, 1875-March 21, 1956; Senate 1941-47.

    WILSON

    Charles (D Texas) June 1, 1933-—; House 1973-—.

    WILSON

    Charles Herbert (D Calif.) Feb. 15, 1917-—; House 1963-81.

    WILSON

    Earl (R Ind.) April 18, 1906-—; House 1941-59, 1961-65.

    WILSON

    George Allison (R Iowa) April 1, 1884-Sept. 8, 1953; Senate Jan. 14, 1943-49; Gov. 1939-43.

    WILSON

    George Howard (D Okla.) Aug. 21, 1905-—; House 1949-51.

    WILSON

    Joseph Franklin (D Texas) March 18, 1901-Oct. 13, 1968; House 1947-55.

    WILSON

    Robert Carlton (Bob) (R Calif.) April 5, 1916-—; House 1953-81.

    WINN

    Larry Jr. (R Kan.) Aug. 22, 1919-—; House 1967-—.

    WINSTEAD

    William Arthur (D Mass.) Jan. 6, 1904-—; House 1943-65.

    WINTER

    Thomas Daniel (R Kan.) July 7, 1896-Nov. 7, 1951; House 1939-47.

    WIRTH

    Timothy Endicott (D Colo.) Sept. 22, 1939-—; House 1975-—.

    WITHERS

    Garrett Lee (D Ky.) June 21, 1884-April 30, 1953; Senate Jan. 20, 1949-Nov. 26, 1950; House Aug. 2, 1952-April 30, 1953.

    WITHROW

    Gardner Robert (R Wis.) Oct. 5, 1892-Sept. 23, 1964; House 1931-39, 1949-61 (1931-35 Republican, 1935-39 Progressive, 1949-61 Republican).

    WOFFORD

    Thomas Albert (D S.C.) Sept. 27, 1908-Feb. 25, 1978; Senate April 5-Nov. 6, 1956.

    WOLCOTT

    Jesse Paine (R Mich.) March 3, 1893-Jan. 28, 1969; House 1931-57.

    WOLD

    John Schiller (R Wyo.) Aug. 31, 1916-—; House 1969-71.

    WOLF

    Frank R. (R Va.) Jan. 30, 1939-—; House 1981-—.

    WOLF

    Leonard George (D Iowa) Oct. 29, 1925-March 28, 1970; House 1959-61.

    WOLFENDEN

    James (R Pa.) July 25, 1889-April 8, 1949; House Nov. 6, 1928-47.

    WOLFF

    Lester Lionel (D N.Y.) Jan. 4, 1919-—; House 1965-81.

    WOLPE

    Howard Eliot (D Mich.) Nov. 2, 1939-—; House 1979-—.

    WOLVERTON

    Charles Anderson (R N.J.) Oct. 24, 1880-May 16, 1969; House 1927-59.

    WON PAT

    Antonio Borja (D Guam) Dec. 10, 1908-—; House 1973-—.

    WOOD

    John Stephens (D Ga.) Feb. 8, 1885-Sept. 12, 1968; House 1931-35, 1945-53.

    WOOD

    John Travers (R Idaho) Nov. 25, 1878-Nov. 2, 1954; House 1951-53.

    WOODHOUSE

    Chase Going (D Conn.) ?-—; House 1945-47, 1949-51.

    WOODRUFF

    Roy Orchard (R Mich.) March 14, 1876-Feb. 12, 1953; House 1913-15, 1921-53 (1913-15 Progressive Republican, 1921-53 Republican).

    WOODRUM

    Clifton Alexander (D Va.) April 27, 1887-Oct. 6, 1950; House 1923-Dec. 31, 1945.

    WORLEY

    Francis Eugene (D Texas) Oct. 10, 1908-Dec. 17, 1974; House 1941-April 3, 1950.

    WORTLEY

    George (R N.Y.) Dec. 8, 1928-—; House 1981-—.

    WRIGHT

    James Claude Jr. (D Texas) Dec. 22, 1922-—; House 1955-—.

    WYATT

    Joseph Peyton Jr. (D Texas) Oct. 12, 1941-—; House 1979-81.

    WYATT

    Wendell (R Ore.) June 15, 1917-—; House Nov. 3, 1964-75.

    WYDEN

    Ron (D Ore.) May 3, 1949-—; House 1981-—.

    WYDLER

    John Waldemar (R N.Y.) June 9, 1924-—; House 1963-81.

    WYLIE

    Chalmers Pangburn (R Ohio) Nov. 23, 1920-—; House 1967-—.

    WYMAN

    Louis Crosby (R N.H.) March 16, 1917-—; House 1963-65, 1967-Dec. 31, 1974; Senate Dec. 31, 1974-Jan. 3, 1975.

    Y
    YARBOROUGH

    Ralph Webster (D Texas) June 8, 1903-—; Senate April 29, 1957-71.

    YATES

    Sidney Richard (D III.) Aug. 27, 1909-—; House 1949-63, 1965-—.

    YATRON

    Gus (D Pa.) Oct. 16, 1927-—; House 1969-—.

    YORTY

    Samuel William (D Calif.) Oct. 1, 1909-—; House 1951-55.

    YOUNG

    Andrew Jackson (D Ga.) March 12, 1932-—; House 1973-77.

    YOUNG

    Charles William (Bill) (R Fla.) Dec. 16, 1930-—; House 1971-—.

    YOUNG

    Clarence Clifton (R Nev.) Nov. 7, 1922-—; House 1953-57.

    YOUNG

    Donald Edwin (R Alaska) June 9, 1933-—; House March 6, 1973-—.

    YOUNG

    Edward Lunn (R S.C.) Sept. 7, 1920-—; House 1973-75.

    YOUNG

    John Andrew (D Texas) Nov. 10, 1916-—; House 1957-79.

    YOUNG

    Milton Ruben (R N.D.) Dec. 6, 1897-—; Senate March 12, 1945-81.

    YOUNG

    Robert A. (D Mo.) Nov. 27, 1923-—; House 1977-—.

    YOUNG

    Samuel Hollingsworth (R III.) Dec. 26, 1922-—; House 1973-75.

    YOUNG

    Stephen Marvin (D Ohio) May 4, 1889-—; House 1933-37, 1941-43, 1949-51; Senate 1959-71.

    YOUNGBLOOD

    Harold Francis (R Mich.) Aug. 7, 1907-—; House 1947-49.

    YOUNGER

    Jesse Arthur (R Calif.) April 11, 1893-June 20, 1967; House 1953-June 20, 1967.

    Z
    ZABLOCKI

    Clement John (D Wis.) Nov. 18, 1912-—; House 1949-—.

    ZEFERETTI

    Leo C. (D N.Y.) July 15, 1927-—; House 1975-—.

    ZELENKO

    Herbert (D N.Y.) March 16, 1906-Feb. 23, 1979; House 1955-63.

    ZIMMERMAN

    Orville (D Mo.) Dec. 31, 1880-April 7, 1948; House 1935-April 7, 1948.

    ZION

    Roger Herschel (R Ind.) Sept. 17, 1921-—; House 1967-75.

    ZORINSKY

    Edward (D Neb.) Nov. 11, 1928-—; Senate Dec. 28, 1976-—.

    ZWACH

    John Matthew (R Minn.) Feb. 8, 1907-—; House 1967-75.

    Appendix

    Political Charts

    Convention Voting, 1948-1980
    Democratic

    1948—Philadelphia

    • For president: Harry S Truman, Mo. (balloting as follows): 1st (before shifts)1st (after shifts)Truman, Mo.926947½Russell, Ga.266263McNutt, Ind.2½½Roe, N.Y.15—Barkley, Ky.1—Not voting23½23
    • For vice president: Alben W. Barkley, Ky., nominated by acclamation.

    1952—Chicago

    • For president: Adlai E. Stevenson, III. (balloting as follows): 1st2nd3rdKefauver, Tenn.340362½275½Russell, Ga.268294261Stevenson, Ill.271324½617½Harriman, N.Y.123½121—Kerr, Okla.655½—Barkley, Ky.48½78½67½Dever, Mass.37½30½½Humphrey, Minn.26——Fulbright, Ark.22——Murray, Mont.12——Truman, Mo.66—Ewing, N.Y.433Douglas, P., Ill.333Douglas, W. O., Wash.½——Not voting11½2The nomination was made unanimous when the third ballot ended.
    • For vice president: John J. Sparkman, Ala., by acclamation.

    1956—Chicago

    • For president: Adlai E. Stevenson, Ill. (balloting as follows): 1stStevenson, Ill.905½Harriman, N.Y.210Johnson, Texas80Symington, Mo.45½Chandler, Ky.36½Davis, Ga.33Battle, Va.32½Timmerman, S.C.23½Lausche, Ohio5½The nomination was mode unanimous at the end of the first ballot.
    • For vice president: Estes Kefauver, Tenn. (balloting as follows): 1st2nd (before switches)2nd (after switches)Kefauver, Tenn.466½551½755½Kennedy, Mass.294½618½589Gore, Tenn.178110½13½Wagner, N.Y.162½9½6Humphrey, Minn.13474½2Hodges, N.C.40½—Maner, Ala.33——Collins, Fla.28½——Anderson, N.M.16——Clement, Tenn.13½½½Brown, Calif.1½—Symington, Mo.1——Johnson, Texas½——Not voting—6½5½

    1960—Los Angeles

    • For president: John F. Kennedy, Mass. (balloting as follows): 1stKennedy, Mass.860Johnson, Texas409Symington, Mo.86Stevenson, Ill.79½Meyner, N.J.43Humphrey, Minn.41½Smathers, Fla.30Barnett, Miss.23Loveless, Iowa1½Faubus, Ark.½Brown, Calif.½Rosellini, Wash.½The nomination was made unanimous when the first ballot ended.
    • For vice president: Lyndon B. Johnson, Texas, nominated by acclamation.

    1964—Atlantic City

    • For president: Lyndon B. Johnson, Texas, nominated by acclamation.
    • For vice president: Hubert H. Humphrey, Minn., nominated by acclamation.

    1968—Chicago

    • For president: Hubert H. Humphrey, Minn. (balloting as follows): 1stHumphrey, Minn.1,759½McCarthy, Minn.601McGovern, S.D.146½Phillips, D.C.67½Moore, N.C.17½Kennedy, R. F., Mass.12Bryant, Ala.1½Wallace, Ala.½Gray, Ga.½Not voting15The nomination was made unanimous when the first ballot ended.
    • For vice president: Edmund S. Muskie, Maine (balloting as follows): 1stMuskie, Maine1,942½Bond, Ga.48½Hoeh, N.H.4Kennedy, R. F., Mass.3½McCarthy, Minn.3Ribicoff, Conn.2McGovern, S.D.2Edwards, Calif.2Daley, Ill.1½McNair, S.C.1½Tate, Pa.1½Sanford, N.C.1Shriver, Ill. and Md.1Lowenstein, N.Y.1Reuss, Wis.1O'Dwyer, N.Y.1Ryan, N.Y.Not voting604½Though all states were called, the roll was never completed. Under suspension of the rules, Muskie was nominated by acclamation.

    1972—Miami Beach

    • For president: George McGovern, S.D. (balloting as follows): 1st (before shifts)1st (after shifts)McGovern, S.D.1,728.351,864.95Jackson, Wash.525.00485.65Wallace, Ala.381.70377.50Chisholm, N.Y.151.95101.45Sanford, N.C.77.5069.50Humphrey, Minn.66.7035.00Mills, Ark.33.8032.80Muskie, Maine24.3020.80Kennedy, E.M., Mass.12.7010.65Hays, Ohio5.005.00McCarthy, Minn.2.002.00Mondale, Minn.1.001.00Clark, N.Y.1.00—Not voting5.009.70
    • For vice president: Thomas Eagleton, Mo. (balloting as follows): 1stEagleton, Mo.1,741.81Farenthold, Texas404.04Gravel, Alaska225.38Peabody, Mass.107.26Smothers, Texas74.00Others388.79Not voting74.70Over 70 other individuals received votes on the vice-presidential roll call.

    1976—New York

    • For president: Jimmy Carter, Ga. (balloting as follows): 1stCarter, Ga.2,238.50Udall, Ariz.329.50Brown, Calif.300.50McCormack, N.Y.22.00Wallace, Ala.57.00Church, Idaho19.00Humphrey, Minn.10Jackson, Wash.10Harris, Okla.9Shapp, Pa.2Others7Not voting3.5“Others” includes one vote each for Robert c. Byrd, W. Va.; Cesar Chavez, Calif.; Leon Jaworski, Texas; Barbara C. Jordan, Texas; Edward M. Kennedy, Mass.; Jennings Randolph, W. Va. and Fred Stover, Minn.
    • For vice president: Walter F. Mondale, Minn. (balloting as follows): 1stMondale, Minn.2,817Dellums, Calif.20Benoit, Mass.12Efaw, Okla.11Others127Not voting26Nineteen other individuals received votes on the vice-presidential roll call.

    1980—New York

    • For president, Jimmy Carter, Ga. (balloting as follows): 1st (before shifts)1st (after shifts)Carter, Ga.2,1232,129Kennedy1,150.51,146.5Others57.557.5After the switches, Carter was nominated by acclamation.
    • For vice president, Walter F. Mondale, Minn., nominated by acclamation before the roll call was completed.
    Republican

    1948—Philadelphia

    • For president: Thomas E. Dewey, N.Y. (balloting as follows): 1st2nd3rdDewey, N.Y.4345151,094Taft, Ohio224274—Stassen, Minn.157149—Vandenberg, Mich.6262—Warren, Calif.5957—Green, Ill.56——Driscoll, N.J.35——Baldwin, Conn.1919—Martin, Mass.1810—Reece, Tenn.151—MacArthur, Wis.117—Dirksen, Ill.1——Not voting3——
    • For vice president: Earl Warren, Calif., nominated by acclamation.

    1952—Chicago

    • For president: Dwight D. Eisenhower, Kan. (balloting as follows): 1st (before shifts)1st (after shifts)Eisenhower, Kan.595845Taft, Ohio500280Warren, Calif.8177Stassen, Minn.20—MacArthur, N.Y.104A motion to make the nomination unanimous was agreed to by voice vote after the shift.
    • For vice president: Richard M. Nixon, Calif., by acclamation.

    1956—San Francisco

    • For president: Dwight D. Eisenhower, Kan., unanimously nominated on the first ballot.
    • For vice president: Richard M. Nixon, Calif., unanimously nominated on the first ballot.

    1960—Chicago

    • For president: Richard M. Nixon, Calif. (balloting as follows): 1stNixon, Calif.1,321Goldwater, Ariz.10The nomination was made unanimous after the first ballot ended.
    • For vice president: Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., Mass., unanimously nominated on the first ballot.

    1964—San Francisco

    • For president: Barry Goldwater, Ariz. (balloting as follows): 1st (before shifts)1st (after shifts)Goldwater, Ariz.8831,220Scranton, Pa.21450Rockefeller, N.Y.1146Romney, Mich.411Smith, Maine2722Judd, Minn.221Fong, Hawaii51Lodge, Mass.2—Not voting—7
    • For vice president: William E. Miller, N.Y., nominated by acclamation.

    1968—Miami Beach

    • For president: Richard M. Nixon, N.Y. (balloting as follows): 1st (before shifts)1st (after shifts)Nixon, N.Y.6921,238Rockefeller, N.Y.27793Reagan, Calif.1822Rhodes, Ohio55—Romney, Mich.50—Case, N.J.22—Carlson, Kan.20—Rockefeller, Ark.18—Fong, Hawaii14—Stassen, Pa.2—Lindsay, N.Y.1—
    • For vice president: Spiro T. Agnew, Md. (balloting as follows): 1stAgnew, Md.1,119Romney, Mich.186Lindsay, N.Y.10Brooke, Mass.1Rhodes, Ohio1Not voting16The nomination was made unanimous when the first ballot ended.

    1972—Miami Beach

    • For president: Richard M. Nixon, N.Y. (balloting as follows): 1stNixon, N.Y.1,347McCloskey, Calif.1
    • For vice president: Spiro T. Angew, Md. (balloting as follows): 1stAgnew, Md.1,345David Brinkley (newscaster)1Not voting2

    1976—Kansas City

    • For president: Gerald R. Ford, Mich. (balloting as follows): 1stFord, Mich.1,187Reagan, Calif.1,070Richardson, Mass.1Not voting1
    • For vice president: Robert Dole, Kan. (balloting as follows): 1stDole, Kan.1,921Others235Not voting103Thirty other individuals received votes on the vice-presidential roll call.

    1980—Detroit

    • For president: Ronald Reagan, Calif. (balloting as follows): 1stReagan, Calif.1,939Anderson, Ill.37Bush, Texas13One vote for Ann Armstrong. Four not voting. After the roll call, the nomination was made unanimous by voice vote.
    • For vice president: George Bush, Texas (balloting as follows): 1stBush, Texas832Helms, N.C.54Others77Thirty-one delegates abstained. After the roll call, Bush's nomination was made unanimous by voice vote.Source: Convention Decisions and Voting Records by Richard C. Bain and Judith H. Parris, Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C., 1973; Congressional Quarterly, 1976 Almanac, 1980 Almanac.
    Distribution of House Seats and Electoral Votes

    Results of Elections in House of Representatives, 1960-1980

    Senate Popular Vote Returns, 1975-76
    ARIZONA

    CALIFORNIA

    CONNECTICUT

    DELAWARE

    FLORIDA

    HAWAII

    INDIANA

    MAINE

    MARYLAND

    MASSACHUSETTS

    MICHIGAN

    MINNESOTA

    MISSISSIPPI

    MISSOURI

    MONTANA

    NEBRASKA

    NEVADA

    NEW HAMPSHIRE

    NEW JERSEY

    NEW MEXICO

    NEW YORK

    NORTH DAKOTA

    OHIO

    PENNSYLVANIA

    RHODE ISLAND

    TENNESSEE

    TEXAS

    UTAH

    VERMONT

    VIRGINIA

    WASHINGTON

    WEST VIRGINIA

    WISCONSIN

    WYOMING

    1976 House Election Returns
    ALABAMA

    ALASKA

    ARIZONA

    ARKANSAS

    CALIFORNIA

    COLORADO

    CONNECTICUT

    DELAWARE

    FLORIDA

    GEORGIA

    HAWAII

    IDAHO

    ILLINOIS

    INDIANA

    IOWA

    KANSAS

    KENTUCKY

    LOUISIANA

    MAINE

    MARYLAND

    MASSACHUSETTS

    MICHIGAN

    MINNESOTA

    MISSISSIPPI

    MISSOURI

    MONTANA

    NEBRASKA

    NEVADA

    NEW HAMPSHIRE

    NEW JERSEY

    NEW MEXICO

    NEW YORK

    NORTH CAROLINA

    NORTH DAKOTA

    OHIO

    OKLAHOMA

    OREGON

    PENNSYLVANIA

    RHODE ISLAND

    SOUTH CAROLINA

    SOUTH DAKOTA

    TENNESSEE

    TEXAS

    UTAH

    VERMONT

    VIRGINIA

    WASHINGTON

    WEST VIRGINIA

    WISCONSIN

    WYOMING

    Gubernatorial Elections: Popular Vote Returns, 1975-76
    ARKANSAS

    DELAWARE

    ILLINOIS

    INDIANA

    KENTUCKY (1975)

    LOUISIANA (1975)

    MISSISSIPPI (1975)

    MISSOURI

    MONTANA

    NEW HAMPSHIRE

    NORTH CAROLINA

    NORTH DAKOTA

    RHODE ISLAND

    UTAH

    VERMONT

    WASHINGTON

    WEST VIRGINIA

    Special House, 1977 Gubernatorial Elections
    Special House Elections, 95th Congress

    1977 Gubernatorial Elections

    Official 1978 Election Results

    Following are final 1978 vote returns for the Senate, House and governorships, compiled by Congressional Quarterly from results furnished by the secretaries of state or election boards in the 50 states.

    All candidates are included who were listed on the ballot. Due to the exclusion of scattered write-in votes from this chart and the results of rounding numbers in computing percentages, the totals do not always equal 100 percent.

    ALABAMA

    ALASKA

    ARIZONA

    ARKANSAS

    CALIFORNIA

    COLORADO

    CONNECTICUT

    DELAWARE

    FLORIDA

    GEORGIA

    HAWAII

    IDAHO

    ILLINOIS

    INDIANA

    IOWA

    KANSAS

    KENTUCKY

    LOUISIANA

    MAINE

    MARYLAND

    MASSACHUSETTS

    MICHIGAN

    MINNESOTA

    MISSISSIPPI

    MISSOURI

    MONTANA

    NEBRASKA

    NEVADA

    NEW HAMPSHIRE

    NEW JERSEY

    NEW MEXICO

    NEW YORK

    NORTH CAROLINA

    NORTH DAKOTA

    OHIO

    OKLAHOMA

    OREGON

    PENNSYLVANIA

    RHODE ISLAND

    SOUTH CAROLINA

    SOUTH DAKOTA

    TENNESSEE

    TEXAS

    UTAH

    VERMONT

    VIRGINIA

    WASHINGTON

    WEST VIRGINIA

    WISCONSIN

    WYOMING

    Special House, 1979 Gubernatorial Elections
    Special House Elections, 96th Congress

    1979 Gubernatorial Elections

    1980 Returns for President, Governor, Congress

    Following are official 1980 vote returns for president, the Senate, House and governorships compiled by Congressional Quarterly from results furnished by the secretaries of state or election boards in the 50 states. All candidates are included who were listed on the ballot. Due to exclusion of scattered write-in votes from this chart, the totals do not always equal 100 percent. The box below shows party designation symbols.

    ALABAMA

    ALASKA

    ARIZONA

    ARKANSAS

    CALIFORNIA

    COLORADO

    CONNECTICUT

    DELAWARE

    FLORIDA

    GEORGIA

    HAWAII

    IDAHO

    ILLINOIS

    INDIANA

    IOWA

    KANSAS

    KENTUCKY

    LOUISIANA

    MAINE

    MARYLAND

    MASSACHUSETTS

    MICHIGAN

    MINNESOTA

    MISSISSIPPI

    MISSOURI

    MONTANA

    NEBRASKA

    NEVADA

    NEW HAMPSHIRE

    NEW JERSEY

    NEW MEXICO

    NEW YORK

    NORTH CAROLINA

    NORTH DAKOTA

    OHIO

    OKLAHOMA

    OREGON

    PENNSYLVANIA

    RHODE ISLAND

    SOUTH CAROLINA

    SOUTH DAKOTA

    TENNESSEE

    TEXAS

    UTAH

    VERMONT

    VIRGINIA

    WASHINGTON

    WEST VIRGINIA

    WISCONSIN

    WYOMING

    Governors of the States Since 1944
    Alabama

    Four-Year Term

    Alaska

    (Became a state Jan. 3, 1959)

    Four-Year Term

    Arizona

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Arkansas

    Two-Year Term

    California

    Four-Year Term

    Colorado

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Connecticut

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Delaware

    Four-Year Term

    Florida

    Four-Year Term

    Georgia

    Four-Year Term

    Hawaii

    (Became a state Aug. 21, 1959.)

    Four-Year Term

    Idaho

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Illinois

    Four-Year Term

    Indiana

    Four-Year Term

    Iowa

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Kansas

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Kentucky

    Four-Year Term

    Louisiana

    Four-Year Term

    Maine

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Maryland

    Four-Year Term

    Massachusetts

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Michigan

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Minnesota

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Mississippi

    Four-Year Term

    Missouri

    Four-Year Term

    Montana

    Four-Year Term

    Nebraska

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Nevada

    Four-Year Term

    New Hampshire

    Two-Year Term

    New Jersey

    Three-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    New Mexico

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    New York

    Four-Year Term

    North Carolina

    Four-Year Term

    North Dakota

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Ohio

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Oklahoma

    Four-Year Term

    Oregon

    Four-Year Term

    Pennsylvania

    Four-Year Term

    Rhode Island

    Two-Year Term

    South Carolina

    Four-Year Term

    South Dakota

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Tennessee

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Texas

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Utah

    Four-Year Term

    Vermont

    Two-Year Term

    Virginia

    Four-Year Term

    Washington

    Four-Year Term

    West Virginia

    Four-Year Term

    Wisconsin

    Two-Year Term

    Four-Year Term

    Wyoming

    Four-Year Term

    Appendix

    The Presidency

    Presidents and Their Cabinets—1933-1980
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt—March 4, 1933-April 12, 1945

    Secretary of State

    • Cordell Hull (D Tenn.)—March 4, 1933-Nov. 30, 1944
    • Edward R. Stettinius Jr. (D Va.)-Dec. 1, 1944-June 27, 1945

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • William H. Woodin (D N.Y.)—March 5, 1933-Dec. 31, 1933
    • Henry Morgenthau Jr. (D N.Y.)—Jan. 1, 1934-July 22, 1945

    Secretary of War

    • George H. Dern (D Utah)—March 4, 1933-Aug. 27, 1936
    • Harry H. Woodring (D Kan.)—Sept. 25, 1936-June 20, 1940
    • Henry L. Stimson (R N.Y.)—July 10, 1940-Sept. 21, 1945

    Attorney General

    • Homer S. Cummings (D Conn.)—March 4, 1933-Jan. 2, 1939
    • Frank Murphy (D Mich)—Jan. 2, 1939-Jan. 18, 1940
    • Robert H. Jackson (D N.Y.)—Jan. 18, 1940-July 10, 1941
    • Francis Biddle (D Pa.)—Sept. 5, 1941-June 30, 1945

    Postmaster General

    • James A. Farley (D N.Y.)—March 4, 1933-Aug. 31, 1940
    • Frank C. Walker (D Pa.)—Sept. 10, 1940-May 8, 1945

    Secretary of the Navy

    • Claude A. Swanson (D Va.)—March 4, 1933-July 7, 1939
    • Charles Edison (D N.J.)—Aug. 5, 1939-June 24, 1940
    • Frank Knox (R Ill.)—July 11, 1940-April 28, 1944
    • James V. Forrestal (D N.Y.)—May 19, 1944-Sept. 17, 1947

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Harold L. Ickes (D Ill.)—March 4, 1933-Feb. 15, 1946

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Henry A. Wallace (D Iowa)—March 4, 1933-Sept. 4, 1940
    • Claude R. Wickard (D Ind.)—Sept. 5, 1940-June 29, 1945

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Daniel C. Roper (D S.C.)—March 4, 1933-Dec. 23, 1938
    • Harry L. Hopkins (D N.Y.)—Dec. 24, 1938-Sept. 18, 1940
    • Jesse H. Jones (D Texas)—Sept. 19, 1940-March 1, 1945
    • Henry A. Wallace (D Iowa)—March 2, 1945-Sept. 20, 1946

    Secretary of Labor

    • Frances Perkins (D N.Y.)—March 4, 1933-June 30, 1945
    Harry S Truman—April 12, 1945-Jan. 20, 1953

    Secretary of State

    • Edward R. Stettinius Jr. (D Va.)—Dec. 1, 1944-June 27, 1945.
    • James F. Byrnes (D S.C.)—July 3, 1945-Jan. 21, 1947
    • George C. Marshall (Pa.)—Jan. 21, 1947-Jan. 20, 1949
    • Dean G. Acheson (D Conn.)—Jan. 21, 1949-Jan. 20, 1953

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • Henry Morgenthau Jr. (D N.Y.)—Jan. 1, 1934-July 22, 1945
    • Fred M. Vinson (D Ky.)—July 23, 1945-June 23, 1946
    • John W. Snyder (D Mo.)—June 25, 1946-Jan. 20, 1953

    Secretary of War

    • Henry L. Stimson (R N.Y.)—July 10, 1940-Sept. 21, 1945
    • Robert Porter Patterson (R N.Y.)—Sept. 27, 1945-July 18, 1947
    • Kenneth C. Royall (D N.C.)—July 19, 1947-Sept. 17, 1947

    Secretary of Defense

    • James V. Forrestal (D N.Y.)—Sept. 17, 1947-March 27, 1949
    • Louis A. Johnson (D W.Va.)—March 28, 1949-Sept. 19, 1950
    • George C. Marshall (Pa.)—Sept. 21, 1950-Sept. 12, 1951
    • Robert A. Lovett (R N.Y.)—Sept. 17, 1951-Jan. 20, 1953

    Attorney General

    • Francis Biddle (D Pa.)—Sept. 5, 1941-June 30, 1945
    • Tom C. Clark (D Texas)—July 1, 1945-Aug. 24, 1949
    • J. Howard McGrath (D R.I.)—Aug. 24, 1949-April 7, 1952
    • James P. McGranery (D Pa.)—May 27, 1952-Jan. 20, 1953

    Postmaster General

    • Frank C. Walker (D Pa.)—Sept 10, 1940-May 8, 1945
    • Robert E. Hannegan (D Mo.)—May 8, 1945-Dec. 16, 1947
    • Jesse M. Donaldson (D Mo.)—Dec. 16, 1947-Jan. 21, 1953

    Dates given are for actual service in the particular office, which may vary from dates of confirmation by the Senate. In some cases individuals served interim appointments before they were confirmed.

    The War and Navy Departments were merged in 1947 into the National Military Establishment. See note 2 for details.

    The National Military Establishment, headed by a secretary of defense, was created Sept. 18, 1947, by the National Security Act of 1947. The act combined the War and Navy Departments under the loose supervision of the secretary of defense. However the lack of authority granted to the secretary led to administrative problems. These were resolved by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949 which reorganized the National Military Establishment into the Department of Defense and consolidated authority in the office of the secretary of defense. Thus the office predates the department by two years.

    Secretary of the Navy

    • James V. Forrestal (D N.Y.)—May 19, 1944-Sept. 17, 1947

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Harold L. Ickes (D Ill.)—March 4, 1933-Feb. 15, 1946
    • Julius A. Krug (D Wis.)—March 18, 1946-Dec. 1, 1949
    • Oscar L. Chapman (D Colo.)—Dec. 1, 1949-Jan. 20, 1953

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Claude R. Wickard (D Ind.)—Sept. 5, 1940-June 29, 1945
    • Clinton P. Anderson (D N.M.)—June 30, 1945-May 10, 1948
    • Charles F. Brannan (D Colo.)—June 2, 1948-Jan. 20, 1953

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Henry A. Wallace (D Iowa)—March 2, 1945-Sept. 20, 1946
    • W. Averell Harriman (D N.Y.)—Oct. 7, 1946-April 22, 1948
    • Charles Sawyer (D Ohio)—May 6, 1948-Jan. 20, 1953

    Secretary of Labor

    • Frances Perkins (D N.Y.)—March 4, 1933-June 30, 1945
    • Lewis B. Schwellenbach (D Wash.)—July 1, 1945-June 10, 1948
    • Maurice J. Tobin (D Mass.)—Aug. 13, 1948-Jan. 20, 1953
    Dwight D. Eisenhower—Jan. 20, 1953-Jan. 20, 1961

    Secretary of State

    • John Foster Dulles (R N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1953-April 22, 1959
    • Christian A. Herter (R Mass.)—April 22, 1959-Jan. 20, 1961

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • George M. Humphrey (R Ohio)—Jan. 21, 1953-July 29, 1957
    • Robert B. Anderson (D Conn.)—July 29, 1957-Jan. 20, 1961

    Secretary of Defense

    • Charles E. Wilson (R Mich.)—Jan. 28, 1953-Oct. 8, 1957
    • Neil H. McElroy (R Ohio)—Oct. 9, 1957-Dec. 1, 1959
    • Thomas S. Gates (R Pa.)—Dec. 2, 1959-Jan. 20, 1961

    Attorney General

    • Herbert Brownell Jr. (R N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1953-Nov. 8, 1957
    • William P. Rogers (R Md.)—Nov. 8, 1957-Jan. 20, 1961

    Postmaster General

    • Arthur E. Summerfield (R Mich.)—Jan. 21, 1953-Jan. 21, 1961

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Douglas McKay (R Ore.)—Jan. 21, 1953-April 15, 1956
    • Fred A. Seaton (R Neb.)—June 8, 1956-Jan. 20, 1961

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Ezra Taft Benson (R Utah)—Jan. 21, 1953-Jan. 20, 1961

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Sinclair Weeks (R Mass.)—Jan. 21, 1953-Nov. 10, 1958
    • Lewis L. Strauss (R N.Y.)—Nov. 13, 1958-June 30, 19591
    • Frederick H Mueller (R Mich.)—Aug. 10, 1959-Jan. 19, 1961

    Secretary of Labor

    • Martin P. Durkin (D Md.)—Jan. 21, 1953-Sept. 10, 1953
    • James P. Mitchell (R N.J.)—Oct. 9, 1953-Jan. 20, 1961

    Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

    • Oveta Culp Hobby (R Texas)—April 11, 1953-July 31, 1955
    • Marion B. Folsom (R N.Y.)—Aug. 1, 1955-July 31, 1958
    • Arthur S. Flemming (R Ohio)—Aug. 1, 1958-Jan. 19, 1961
    John F. Kennedy—Jan. 20, 1961-Nov. 22, 1963

    Secretary of State

    • Dean Rusk (D N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • Douglas Dillon (R N.J.)—Jan. 21, 1961-April 1, 1965

    Secretary of Defense

    • Robert S. McNamara (R Mich.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Feb. 29, 1968

    Attorney General

    • Robert F. Kennedy (D Mass.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Sept. 3, 1964

    Postmaster General

    • J. Edward Day (D Calif.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Sept. 10, 1963
    • John A. Gronouski (D Wis.)—Sept. 10, 1963-Aug. 30, 1965

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Stewart L. Udall (D Ariz.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Orville L. Freeman (D Minn.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Luther H. Hodges (D N.C.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 15, 1965

    Secretary of Labor

    • Arthur J. Goldberg (D Wash., D.C.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Sept. 20, 1962
    • W. Willard Wirtz (D Ill.)—Sept. 25, 1962-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

    • Abraham A. Ribicoff (D Conn.)—Jan. 21, 1961-July 13, 1962
    • Anthony J. Celebrezze (D Ohio)—July 31, 1962-Aug. 17, 1965

    Strauss served an interim appointment as secretary of commerce. On June 19, 1959, the Senate refused to confirm his nomination.

    The Health, Education and Welfare Department was established April 11, 1953.

    Lyndon B. Johnson—Nov. 22, 1963-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of State

    • Dean Rusk (D N.Y.)—Jan. 20, 1961-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • Douglas Dillon (R N.J.)—Jan. 21, 1961-April 1, 1965
    • Henry H. Fowler (D Va.)—April 1, 1965-Dec. 20, 1968
    • Joseph W. Barr (D Ind.)—Dec. 21, 1968-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Defense

    • Robert S. McNamara (R Mich.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Feb. 29, 1968
    • Clark M. Clifford (D Md.)—March 1, 1968-Jan. 20, 1969

    Attorney General

    • Robert F. Kennedy (D Mass.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Sept. 3, 1964
    • Nicholas deB. Katzenbach (D Wash., D.C.)—Sept. 4, 1964-Oct. 2, 1966
    • Ramsey Clark (D Texas)—Oct. 3, 1966-Jan. 20, 1969

    Postmaster General

    • John A. Gronouski (D Wis.)—Sept. 10, 1963-Aug. 30, 1965
    • Lawrence F. O'Brien (D Mass.)—Nov. 3, 1965-April 26, 1968
    • W. Marvin Watson (D Texas)—April 26, 1968-Jan. 22, 1969

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Stewart L. Udall (D Ariz.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Orville L. Freeman (D Minn.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Luther H. Hodges (D N.C.)—Jan. 21, 1961-Jan. 15, 1965
    • John T. Connor (D N.J.)—Jan. 18, 1965-Jan. 31, 1967
    • Alexander B. Trowbridge (D Wash., D.C.)—June 14, 1967-March 1, 1968
    • C. R. Smith (D N.Y.)—March 6, 1968-Jan. 19, 1969

    Secretary of Labor

    • W. Willard Wirtz (D Ill.)—Sept. 25, 1962-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

    • Anthony J. Celebrezze (D Ohio)—July 31, 1962-Aug. 17, 1965
    • John W. Gardner (R N.Y.)—Aug. 18, 1965-March 1, 1968
    • Wilbur J. Cohen (D Md.)—March 22, 1968-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

    • Robert C. Weaver (D Wash., D.C.)—Jan. 18, 1966-Dec. 31, 1968
    • Robert C. Wood (D Mass.)—Jan. 2, 1969-Jan. 20, 1969

    Secretary of Transportation

    • Alan C. Boyd (D Fla.)—Jan. 12, 1967-Jan. 20, 1969
    Richard M. Nixon—Jan. 20, 1969-Aug. 9, 1974

    Secretary of State

    • William P. Rogers (R Md.)—Jan. 22, 1969-Sept. 3, 1973
    • Henry A. Kissinger (Wash., D.C.)—Sept. 30, 1973-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • David M. Kennedy (R Utah)—Jan. 22, 1969-Feb. 1, 1971
    • John B. Connally (D Texas)—Feb. 11, 1971-June 12, 1972
    • George P. Shultz (R Va.)—June 12, 1972-May 8, 1974
    • William E. Simon (R N.J.)—May 8, 1974-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Defense

    • Melvin R. Laird (R Wis.)—Jan. 20, 1969-Jan. 20, 1973
    • Elliot L. Richardson (R Mass.)—Jan. 29, 1973-April 30, 1973
    • James R. Schlesinger (R Va.)—July 2, 1973-Nov. 19, 1975

    Attorney General

    • John N. Mitchell (R N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1969-March 1, 1972
    • Richard G. Kleindienst (R Ariz.)—March 2, 1972-May 24, 1973
    • Elliot L. Richardson (R Mass.)—May 25, 1973-Oct. 20, 1973
    • William B. Saxbe (R Ohio)—Jan. 4, 1974-Feb. 3, 1975

    Postmaster General

    • Winton M. Blount (R Ala.)—Jan. 22, 1969-June 30, 1970

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Walter J. Hickel (R Alaska)—Jan. 24, 1969-Nov. 25, 1970
    • Rogers C. B. Morton (R Md.)—Jan. 29, 1971-April 30, 1975

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Clifford M. Hardin (R Neb.)—Jan. 21, 1969-Nov. 17, 1971
    • Earl L. Butz (R Ind.)—Dec. 2, 1971-Oct. 4, 1976

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Maurice H. Stans (R N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1969-Feb. 15, 1972
    • Peter G. Peterson (R Neb.)—Feb. 29, 1972-Feb. 1, 1973
    • Frederick B. Dent (R S.C.)—Feb. 2, 1973-March 26, 1975

    Secretary of Labor

    • George P. Shultz (R Ill.)—Jan. 22, 1969-July 1, 1970
    • James D. Hodgson (R Minn.)—July 2, 1970-Feb. 1, 1973
    • Peter J. Brennan (D N.Y.)—Feb. 2, 1973-March 15, 1975

    Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

    • Robert H. Finch (R Calif.)—Jan. 21, 1969-June 23, 1970
    • Elliot L. Richardson (R Mass.)—June 24, 1970-Jan. 29, 1973
    • Caspar W. Weinberger (R Calif.)—Feb. 12, 1973-Aug. 8, 1975

    Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

    • George W. Rommey (R Mich.)—Jan. 21, 1969-Feb. 2, 1973
    • James T. Lynn (R Ohio)—Feb. 2, 1973-Feb. 9, 1975

    Secretary of Transportation

    • John A. Volpe (R Mass.)—Jan. 22, 1969-Jan. 20, 1973
    • Claude S. Brinegar (R Calif.)—Feb. 2, 1973-March 6, 1975

    The Housing and Urban Development Department was established Sept. 9, 1965.

    The Department of Transportation was established Oct. 15, 1966.

    Gerald R. Ford—Aug. 9, 1974-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of State

    • Henry A. Kissinger (Wash., D.C.)—Sept. 30, 1973-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • William E. Simon (R N.J.)—May 8, 1974-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Defense

    • James R. Schlesinger (R Va.)—July 2, 1973-Nov. 19, 1975
    • Donald H. Rumsfeld (R Ill.)—Nov. 19, 1975-Jan. 20, 1977

    Attorney General

    • William B. Saxbe (R Ohio)—Jan. 4, 1974-Feb. 3, 1975
    • Edward H. Levi (D Ill.)—Feb. 7, 1975-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Rogers C. B. Morton (R Md.)—Jan. 29, 1971-April 30, 1975
    • Stanley K. Hathaway (R Wyo.)—June 13, 1975-Oct. 9, 1975
    • Thomas S. Kleppe (R N.D.)—Oct. 17, 1975-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Earl L. Butz (R Ind.)—Dec. 2, 1971-Oct. 4, 1976
    • John A. Knebel (R Va.)—Nov. 5, 1976-Jan. 20, 19771

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Frederick B. Dent (R S.C.)—Feb. 2, 1973-March 26, 1975
    • Rogers C. B. Morton (R Md.)—May 1, 1975-Jan. 30, 1976
    • Elliot L. Richardson (R Mass.)—Feb. 2, 1976-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Labor

    • Peter J. Brennan (D N.Y.)—Feb. 2, 1973-March 15, 1975
    • John T. Dunlop (D Mass.)—March 18, 1975-Jan. 31, 1976
    • W. J. Usery Jr. (D Ga.)—Feb. 10, 1976-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

    • Caspar W. Weinberger (R Calif.)—Feb. 12, 1973-Aug. 8, 1975
    • F. David Mathews (D Ala.)—Aug. 8, 1975-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

    • James T. Lynn (R Ohio)—Feb. 2, 1973-Feb. 9, 1975
    • Carla Anderson Hills (R Calif.)—March 10, 1975-Jan. 20, 1977

    Secretary of Transportation

    • Claude S. Brinegar (R Calif.)—Feb. 2, 1973-March 6, 1975
    • William T. Coleman Jr. (R Pa.)—March 7, 1975-Jan. 20, 1977
    Jimmy Carter—Jan. 20, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of State

    • Cyrus R. Vance (D W.Va.)—Jan. 23, 1977-April 28, 1980
    • Edmund S. Muskie (D Maine)—May 8, 1980-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of the Treasury

    • W. Michael Blumenthal (D Mich.)—Jan. 23, 1977-Aug. 4, 1979
    • G. William Miller (D R.I.)—Aug. 6, 1979-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Defense

    • Harold Brown (D N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981

    Attorney General

    • Griffin B. Bell (D Ga.)—Jan. 26, 1977-Aug. 16, 1979
    • Benjamin R. Civiletti (D Md.)—Aug. 16, 1979-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of the Interior

    • Cecil D. Andrus (D Idaho)—Jan. 23, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Agriculture

    • Bob Bergland (D Minn.)—Jan. 23, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Commerce

    • Juanita M. Kreps (D Ky.)—Jan. 23, 1977-Nov. 2, 1979
    • Philip M. Klutznick (D Ill.)—Jan. 9, 1980-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Labor

    • F. Ray Marshall (D La.)—Jan. 27, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare

    • Joseph A. Califano, Jr. (D N.Y.)—Jan. 21, 1977-Aug. 3, 1979
    • Patricia Roberts Harris (D Ill.)—Aug. 3, 1979-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Education

    • Shirley M. Hufstedler (D Calif.)—Dec. 6, 1979

    Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

    • Patricia Roberts Harris (D Ill.)—Jan. 23, 1977-Aug. 3, 1979
    • Moon Landrieu (D La.)—Sept. 24, 1979-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Transportation

    • Brock Adams (D Wash.)—Jan. 23, 1977-July 20, 1979
    • Neil E. Goldschmidt (D Ore.) Aug. 15, 1979-Jan. 20, 1981

    Secretary of Energy

    • James R. Schlesinger (R N.Y.)—Aug. 5, 1977-Aug. 24, 1979
    • Charles W. Duncan, Jr. (Ind. Texas)—Aug. 24, 1979-Jan. 20, 1981

    The Post Office ceased to be a Cabinet office in 1970 with the creation of the U.S. Postal Service as an independent permanent corporation.

    Knebel served an interim appointment. His name was never submitted to the Senate for confirmation.

    The Department of Health, Education and Welfare became the Department of Health and Human Services May 4, 1980.

    The Department of Education was officially created May 4, 1980.

    The Department of Energy was officially created Aug. 4, 1977.

    Presidential Vetoes, 1977-1980

    From a purely defensive standpoint, the most powerful weapon in the president's legislative arsenal is his authority to veto bills. Under terms of the Constitution, Congress must submit to the president every bill or joint resolution it passes, which he must then approve or send back to Congress. In the event he disapproves, Congress can override the veto only by a two-thirds vote of both houses. (Under a Supreme Court decision, a quorum must be present for the override to be effective.)

    Because a president usually finds it relatively easy to marshal the support of at least one-third plus one member of the House or the Senate, the veto has been used with deadly effect.

    From 1789 through 1980, 2,386 bills had been vetoed. The direct veto had been used 1,378 times and the pocket veto 1,008 times.

    During his four-year tenure in office, President Carter vetoed 29 public bills. Carter's veto mark was higher than his immediate Democratic predecessors, Lyndon B. Johnson, who vetoed 13 measures during his five years and two months in office, and John F. Kennedy, who vetoed nine in the two years and 10 months he served. Carter's immediate Republican predecessors, both of whom had Democratic Congresses, vetoed comparatively more measures. President Richard M. Nixon vetoed 40 bills during five and one-half years in office, while Gerald R. Ford vetoed 61 bills during his two and one-half years in office. (Congress and the Nation Vol. IV, p. 1117)

    Carter was the first president since Harry S Truman to have a veto overridden by a Congress controlled by his own party. Carter vetoed a public debt limit bill that contained a section killing the import fee he imposed on foreign oil. The bill was overridden by a substantial margin on June 6, 1980. A second override occurred Aug. 26, 1980, when Congress overwhelmingly voted to approve a Veterans Administration physicians' salary increase bill over the president's veto.

    Truman vetoed five public bills that were overridden by a Democratic Congress. The all-time record for veto overrides was held by Andrew Johnson. The Republican-and Unionist-dominated Congresses overrode 15 of Johnson's vetoes.

    Sixteen of Carter's vetoes were pocket vetoes, accomplished by his refusal to sign certain bills after Congress adjourned sine die. When Congress is in session, a bill becomes law without the president's signature if he does not act upon it within 10 days, excluding Sundays, from the time he receives it. But if Congress adjourns within that 10-day period, the bill is killed without the president's formal veto.

    In other override attempts, the House Sept. 7, 1978, sustained Carter's veto of a weapons procurement bill (HR 10929) that authorized funding for a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier that he opposed. The House Oct. 5, 1978, sustained Carter's veto of a public works appropriation bill that included funding for water projects that Carter wanted to kill.

    95th Congress, First Session
    S 1811 (Energy Administration Authorization)

    To authorize fiscal 1978 appropriations for Department of Energy research and development programs.

    Congress Oct. 20 cleared the energy research bill, which contained an $80 million authorization to continue work on the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant, a project Carter wanted to abandon. Then in the planning stages, the demonstration plant was to be built on the Clinch River near Oak Ridge, Tenn., to show that plutonium-fueled and plutonium-producing “breeder” reactors were a feasible source of electricity and nuclear fuel.

    Emphasizing his determination to keep the United States out of the plutonium business, President Carter vetoed S 1811 Nov. 5. In his veto message Carter characterized the project as “a large and unnecessarily expensive project, which, when completed, would be technically obsolete and economically unsound.” Continuation of the project, he said, was incompatible with his efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

    No effort was made to override the veto. On the key House and Senate votes on the Clinch River issue earlier in the year, more than one-third of the members of each chamber had supported Carter's position. Those votes cast substantial doubts on the ability of the project's supporters to muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override the veto.

    HR 2521 (Rabbit Meat Inspection)

    To require federal inspection of domestic rabbit meat and spot checks of imported rabbit meat.

    In his Nov. 9 veto message, Carter said there was no justification for requiring U.S. taxpayers to pay for inspection of a specialty food consumed by relatively few people. Furthermore, he added, rabbit meat was already subject to inspection by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under pure food laws and neither FDA nor Agriculture Department inspections had revealed any significant health problems with rabbit meat. Processors wanting their meat inspected voluntarily by the Agriculture Department could do so at their own expense.

    Carter also opposed the spot checks of imported rabbit meat, claiming such checks would “strain relations” with the People's Republic of China, the principal rabbit meat exporter to the United States.

    Congress made no attempt to override the veto. It was the second veto for Carter and for a rabbit meat bill. President Ford had vetoed a similar measure in 1976, largely for the same reasons.

    95th Congress, Second Session
    HR 3161 (Firefighters' Workweek)

    To reduce the basic workweek for federal firefighters to 56 hours, from 72.

    In his June 19 veto, President Carter criticized the work reduction bill for its failure to include a commensurate pay reduction. Pointing out that the bill, in effect, would raise the total hourly pay by more than 15 percent, Carter said such a raise could not be justified in light of his recommendation for a 5.5 percent pay ceiling for all federal workers. Carter also claimed that the Defense Department alone would be required to hire an additional 4,600 firefighters, at an annual cost of $46.7 million, to maintain existing protection of its facilities.

    Congress did not try to override the veto. An attempt in the House to attach the language of HR 3161 to the civil service reform measure (S 2640—PL 95-454) was ruled out of order.

    HR 10882 (Sikes Act Amendments)

    To authorize fiscal 1979-81 funds for fish, wildlife and recreation programs on certain federal lands.

    President Carter vetoed this extension of the Sikes Act July 10 because the authorizations were too high. He also objected to a provision requiring executive agencies to justify spending requests that were below the levels authorized in the bill.

    Congress did not try to override the veto. Instead, it passed new legislation (HR 13745—PL 95-420) reducing the authorizations and eliminating the justification provision.

    HR 10929 (Weapons Procurement Authorization)

    To authorize fiscal 1979 appropriations for weapons procurement.

    Carter vetoed HR 10929 Aug. 17 because the bill “does not spend wisely.” The measure, Carter said, eliminated “funds for high priority defense requirements” but added “funds for purposes which do not meet our defense needs.” Carter was particularly critical of Congress' addition of almost $2 billion to his budget for a Nimitz-class nuclear aircraft carrier, which Carter called an unneeded luxury.

    Although on three earlier occasions the House had voted for the aircraft carrier by large margins, it voted Sept. 7 to sustain Carter's veto. Opponents of the veto could not even muster a simple majority, let alone the two-thirds majority needed to override. The vote to override was 191-206. Congress subsequently sent Carter a revised version of the fiscal 1979 procurement bill, which was identical to the vetoed measure except that it eliminated funding for the nuclear carrier. Carter signed that bill (S 3486—PL 95-485) into law Oct. 20.

    HR 12928 (Public Works Appropriations)

    To appropriate $10.2 billion for water and energy development in fiscal 1979.

    The veto of HR 12928 was part of a continuing battle between Carter and Congress over who would control the more than $3 billion spent annually on federal water development. Under the traditional congressional “pork barrel” system of distributing funds for dams, irrigation channels and other water projects, members frequently voted without question for their colleagues' projects in return for projects in their own districts. Carter had sought to reform that practice so that only those projects that were environmentally sound and economically justifiable would be built.

    The debate over HR 12928 focused on six water projects that had been on Carter's 1977 “hit list” of 18 water projects he wanted killed. They had been removed from the fiscal 1978 appropriations bill in a compromise with Carter, and the president contended that the 1977 action killed the projects forever. The House and Senate disagreed, and the final version of HR 12928, cleared for the president Sept. 27, provided construction funding for three of the disputed projects and planning funds for the other three. In addition, Congress refused Carter's request to provide full, up-front funding for several water projects that met environmental and economic criteria acceptable to the administration.

    Carter had threatened to veto the bill if it contained funds for projects on his 1977 “hit list.” He made good his promise, vetoing the bill Oct. 5 because it contained “provisions for excessive, wasteful water projects and ill-advised limitations on efficient program management.”

    Defying both its Democratic and Republican leadership, the House later that day refused to override the veto. The vote to sustain was 223-190, 53 votes short of the two-thirds needed to override. The action was a stunning victory for Carter, who, assisted by his Cabinet and top aides, blitzed the House with well-organized lobbying.

    Carter and Congress later patched up their differences, at least long enough to agree to a modified replacement for the vetoed measure. The compromise (H J Res 1139—PL 95-482) knocked out funding for the six disputed projects, as well as for 10 others added by Congress.

    HR 9370 (Aquaculture Act)

    To provide federal assistance for aquaculture, the controlled cultivation of fish and shellfish.

    HR 9370 was the first of 13 bills President Carter pocket vetoed in 1978. In his Oct. 18 veto statement, Carter expressed concern about provisions in the bill that gave the industry up to $300 million in loan guarantees and up to $250 million in insurance. Carter said he opposed such major new subsidies until a clear need for them had been established.

    HR 11445 (Small Business Amendments)

    To extend through fiscal 1982 and expand programs operated by the Small Business Administration (SBA).

    President Carter had a number of objections to the bill he pocket vetoed Oct. 25. In a memorandum of disapproval, Carter objected to the bill's funding—it authorized $2 billion more than Carter requested—its continuation of a farm disaster lending program and its expanded role for the SBA's advocacy office. Carter said the bill had some “beneficial features,” but was “not the best we can do for small business in the United States....”

    S 1104 (Legionville Historic Site)

    To authorize the establishment of the Legionville National Historic Site in Pennsylvania.

    Carter pocket vetoed this measure Nov. 2 on the grounds that the area was not of enough national significance to warrant the cost of creating and maintaining it as a national historic site. The area was to commemorate the career of Gen. “Mad” Anthony Wayne.

    HR 11092 (Navajo-Hopi Relocation)

    To authorize appropriations for the Relocation Commission, which was working on dividing between the Navajos and Hopis land formerly held jointly by the two tribes.

    Maintenance of the separation of powers motivated Carter's Nov. 2 pocket veto of HR 11092. The president objected to a provision that would give either chamber of Congress power to veto the final relocation plan.

    I have previously informed the Congress of my view that such legislative veto devices are unconstitutional intrusions into the day-to-day administration of the law by the Executive Branch, including independent agencies such as the Relocation Commission. Congress is constitutionally empowered to overrule agency decisions executing the law only by enacting legislation subject to the veto power of the President under Article I, section 7 of the Constitution.

    HR 11861 (Navy-Commerce Meeting)

    To require the secretaries of commerce and the Navy to meet at least four times a year with members of the maritime industry and to report to Congress annually on those meetings.

    Pocket vetoing this measure Nov. 2, Carter said the bill was unnecessary and “an undue legislative intrusion into administrative activities which are the appropriate responsibility of the Executive Branch....”

    HR 11580 (Lottery Exports)

    To permit the export of tickets and other goods used in lotteries.

    President Carter pocket vetoed this bill Nov. 4 without issuing a veto message. Congress had cleared the measure Oct. 13.

    HR 9518 (Shipping Rebating)

    To strengthen enforcement efforts against the practice of illegal rebating in ocean shipping.

    Rebating was the practice steamship companies used to gain cargo shipments by offering shippers discounts or kickbacks that were below the rates they were required to file with the Federal Maritime Commission. Rebating was a violation of federal law, and to beef up enforcement efforts the bill increased the penalties and required foreign-flag steamship companies carrying U.S. cargoes to obey the U.S. anti-rebating laws.

    In a Nov. 4 memorandum of disapproval, Carter pocket vetoed the bill. He said his administration was committed to enforcing the anti-rebating laws but feared the legislation would jeopardize continuing State Department talks with Japan and European countries on a wide range of shipping problems, including rebating.

    In 1979 Congress passed new anti-rebating legislation that resolved Carter's concerns about the measure, and he signed it into law (S 199—PL 96-25).

    HR 6536 (D.C. Employees' Pensions)

    To authorize $1.63 billion in federal payments from fiscal 1979 through fiscal 2003 to cover the unfunded liability of pension plans for District of Columbia police, firefighters, teachers and judges.

    Pocket vetoing the bill Nov. 4, Carter said he agreed with the main purpose of the bill, which was to put the pension plans on a sound financial footing. But he claimed the bill “overstates the degree of federal responsibility” for the indebtedness of the plans. And he charged that a large share of the plans' financial problems “derives from abuses of the disability retirement statutes which were permitted to flourish by those responsible for their effective administration.”

    S 1503 (Tris Indemnification)

    To authorize federal indemnification of businesses that sustained losses as a result of the government ban on the use of the fire retardant Tris in children's sleepwear.

    The proposal to reimburse companies grew out of a 1971 federal regulation requiring children's sleepwear to be flame resistant. A second federal standard, for larger sizes of sleepwear, went into effect in 1974. Manufacturers relied on Tris to meet the federal standards.

    However, Tris was found to have carcinogenic properties and was banned as a hazardous substance in 1977. Some companies had stopped using Tris as early as 1974, when information about its potential dangers first became available. Others continued to use the product until it was banned.

    Explaining his Nov. 4 pocket veto, Carter said the indemnification “would establish an unprecedented and unwise use of taxpayers funds....” It could have meant that in the future the government would have to pay industry “every time new information arises which shows that a product used to meet regulatory standards is hazardous,” Carter said. “This would be wrong.”

    Enactment of the bill also would have meant indemnification of some manufacturers who marketed Tris-treated nightwear even “after they knew, or should have known, that such products constituted a hazard to the health of children.”

    HR 13719 (Guam, Virgin Islands Payments)

    To authorize federal payments to Guam and the Virgin Islands to compensate for revenue the territories lost as a result of the Revenue Act of 1978.

    Carter pocket vetoed the bill Nov. 4, contending that substitution of direct federal payments to offset revenue losses would not reach the underlying economic problems that troubled the territories and was therefore an unacceptable long-range solution.

    HR 9937 (Textile Tariffs)

    To ban any negotiated reduction in textile duties.

    Supporters of the reduction ban argued that the roughly 2.5 million workers in the textile industry were particularly vulnerable to import competition, and that an estimated 400,000 jobs had been eliminated by imports over the last decade.

    Explaining his Nov. 11 pocket veto, President Carter said the ban could force U.S. trading partners to increase duties on major U.S. exports, including mill products and fashion clothing. Even more serious, he added, the ban could cause the collapse of the Multilateral Trade Negotiations then under way in Geneva.

    HR 11545 (Meat Imports)

    To protect U.S. beef producers from import competition.

    The bill revised the 1964 meat import act in two major ways. It changed the complex formula for calculating meat import quota levels, so that when domestic supplies were scarce and prices were high more imported meat would come into the United States; imports would shrink when domestic beef was more plentiful. HR 11545 also sharply restricted the president's authority to lift the quota, allowing him to do so only in a national emergency, a natural disaster that cut domestic supplies severely, or an excessive rise in the farm price of cattle.

    It was this limitation that caused Carter to pocket veto the bill Nov. 11. He claimed the limitations deprived him of “the only anti-inflationary tool available in this area.” The president also objected to a minimum import level set by the bill, which he said would endanger U.S. trade relations abroad.

    S 2416 (Nurses' Training)

    To extend federal support for nurse training programs through fiscal 1980, authorizing $200 million for the program each year.

    Despite Carter's request that most nurse training aid be ended, Congress cleared the extension Oct. 15, the last day of the session.

    Carter pocket vetoed the bill Nov. 11, saying he would not sign it because its spending levels were “excessive,” particularly since two decades of federal aid to nursing schools had all but ended nursing shortages. Carter added that “future federal assistance should be limited to geographic and specialty areas that need nurses most.”

    Congressional sources predicted Carter would have no more success in killing the nursing programs than President Ford had. Ford's 1975 veto of a similar reauthorization was overridden. Those predictions proved true in 1979, when Carter signed into law a one-year, $103 million extension of federal aid for nursing education (S 230—PL 96-76).

    96th Congress, First Session

    President Carter vetoed no public bills during the first session of the 96th Congress. However, his first veto of 1980 was of a bill passed in 1979.

    96th Congress, Second Session
    S 2096 (Dioxins Study)

    To require the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) to study the health effects of dioxins, the chemicals used in Agent Orange and other herbicides.

    Vetoing the bill Jan. 2, Carter said he supported efforts to investigate the effects of dioxins. Agent Orange, a defoliant used in Vietnam, was blamed for a host of health problems—including cancer, liver damage, neurological disorders and birth defects in offspring—of soldiers exposed to it. But Carter vetoed S 2096 because it required Congress' Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) to approve the design of the HEW study. Such a “legislative veto device” was an “unconstitutional intrusion” into the administrative authority of the executive branch, he said. Carter added that the bill was unnecessary anyway because HEW already planned a study of dioxins.

    Carter signed another bill (HR 3892—PL 96-151) that contained an identical provision with regard to a Veterans Administration (VA) study of dioxins. However, Carter said he would tell the VA administrator not to consider the provision requiring OTA approval of its study plan legally binding.

    HR 5235 (Military Doctor Pay Bill)

    To increase bonus pay for military doctors.

    While acknowledging the shortage of physicians in the armed forces that the bill was designed to cure, Carter vetoed it March 11. The bill was a “good example...of the type of unjustified federal largesse that we must stop if the budget is to be balanced,” he said.

    Carter specifically objected to Congress' “unnecessary” expansion of the original administration proposal, and to pay hikes for Public Health Service (PHS) officers. Other “flaws” cited by Carter were “unduly generous bonuses” and creation of a permanent bonus system rather than a temporary one.

    Congress did not attempt to overide the veto but in June it cleared legislation (PL 96-284) increasing bonuses for military doctors but excluding PHS doctors from the bonus program. Carter signed that bill June 28. Congress subsequently attached pay boosts for PHS doctors to a mental health services bill that the president strongly supported, and he signed that measure in October.

    HR 7428 (Oil Import Fee)

    To impose a $4.62-perbarrel fee on imported oil.

    Handing Carter one of the worst defeats of his presidency, Congress June 6 overrode his veto of legislation that killed his oil import fee. It was the first veto by a Democratic president to be overridden since 1952.

    Carter had imposed the $4.62-per-barrel fee, which he billed as a conservation measure, as part of his March 14 anti-inflation package. The fee was to be passed through to consumers as a 10-cent-a-gallon surcharge on gasoline.

    The House voted by an overwhelming margin of 376-30 June 4 to kill the import fee. The Senate followed suit later that day, voting more than 4-to-1 in favor of blocking the fee. From those votes, it was clear that a presidential veto would not survive an override attempt. Nonetheless, Carter June 5 vetoed the measure, which had been attached to a routine but urgent bill raising the ceiling on the national debt.

    Both chambers voted to override the veto the following day; only a handful of members, all Democrats, supported the president on the final tally. The override votes of 335-34 in the House and 68-10 in the Senate far exceeded the two-thirds majority required to pass the repeal measure over the veto. The action came while administration lawyers were appealing a federal district court ruling that Carter lacked the legal authority to impose the fee.

    HR 5036 (Ute Indian Land Transfer)

    To provide the Ute Mountain Ute Indian tribes with land and payment to compensate for revenues lost from oil and gas leases on another piece of land in New Mexico.

    The vetoed bill, which cleared the House in February and the Senate in May, would have provided the tribes with nearly 3,000 acres in land and a payment of more than $5.8 million.

    Vetoing the bill June 6, Carter said the legislation violated a 1972 Supreme Court ruling that gave the land to the Navajos. However, he signed a modified version (HR 8112—PL 96-492) that cut the payment to $4 million. That bill cleared Congress in November and was signed Dec. 2.

    HR 7102 (Veterans Administration Health Care)

    To authorize salary increases for Veterans Administration (VA) doctors and dentists.

    Three months after Congress handed Carter a resounding defeat by overriding his veto of legislation to kill the oil import fee, both chambers handily overturned his veto of a bill authorizing sizable pay hikes for VA doctors and dentists.

    The bill, which Congress cleared Aug. 1, added $10,000 to $20,000 a year in special incentive payments to VA doctors' salaries. Objecting to the cost of the bill—which he claimed would cost taxpayers $80 million a year—Carter vetoed the legislation Aug. 22. The veto was overridden Aug. 26 by both chambers, and the bill became law (PL 96-330).

    Only five members supported the president. The House vote was 401-5; the Senate vote was 85-0.

    S 1464 (Chippewa Land Purchase)

    To purchase 105 acres of land for the Mille Lacs Band of Indians in Minnesota.

    The bill, which cleared Congress Sept. 24, would have instructed the government to buy the land for the Indians' use from a private developer who faced bankruptcy. Carter objected to the purchase price and vetoed the bill Oct. 12. There was no override attempt.

    HR 7584 (State, Justice, Commerce Appropriations)

    To appropriate $9,131,056,000 for the departments of State, Justice and Commerce.

    The funding bill, which cleared Congress Dec. 3, fell victim to an anti-busing rider opposed by the administration. The provision would bar the Justice Department from initiating lawsuits that could result in court-ordered school busing for desegregation purposes.

    In his Dec. 13 veto message, Carter described the rider as “an unprecedented prohibition” on the ability of the president and attorney general to enforce constitutional rights. There was no attempt to override the veto, and both chambers subsequently agreed to drop a similar anti-busing provision from a continuing funding resolution for the departments.

    HR 5888 (Law Enforcement Officers' and Firefighters' Death Benefits)

    To provide for payment of a $50,000 lump-sum death benefit to survivors of federal law enforcement officers, firefighters and certain other employees killed in the line of duty.

    The bill, which cleared Congress Dec. 10, would provide benefits in addition to regular death benefits available to all federal employees and would be retroactive to Sept. 26, 1976.

    Carter pocket vetoed the bill Dec. 23, saying that the special benefits were “preferential and unwarranted” and that the bill “would become a precedent for extension of similar benefits to other federal employees.”

    S 1097 (National Tourism Policy)

    To establish a United States Travel and Tourism Administration as an independent agency, create a Travel and Tourism Advisory Board and abolish the U.S. Travel Service of the Department of Commerce.

    The bill resulted from congressional concern that the administration was not paying sufficient attention to the development of tourism and travel by foreigners in the United States.

    Carter pocket vetoed the bill Dec. 24, criticizing the “seriously flawed management approach” in separating tourism promotion from trade. He also opposed the creation of a new agency that would not be subject to presidential review.

    HR 6257 (Alaska Railroad/National Forest Service Lands)

    To authorize the secretary of agriculture to dispose of certain parcels of land within the national forest system.

    The controversial portion of HR 6257 did not involve forest systems but an amendment that would require the secretary of transportation to issue regulations to determine the rental rates for Alaska Railroad lands. The House accepted the amendment Dec. 16, clearing the measure.

    Carter objected that the regulations “would result in a loss of revenue to the railroad” and that it would “inhibit the railroad's ability to establish a modern lease land development program consistent with normal commercial practice.” The bill was pocket vetoed Dec. 28.

    Controversial Nominations, 1977-1980

    Nominations are appointments to federal office by the president that are subject to confirmation by the Senate. Officials appointed in this manner include those in the executive branch at the Cabinet and sub-Cabinet levels, federal judges, ambassadors and members of federal regulatory agencies. Most of the thousands of nominations sent to the Senate each year are those of military officers whose promotions must be confirmed.

    While most nominations win quick Senate approval, some are controversial and can become the subject of heated debate and prolonged consideration. The 1977 nomination of John W. McGarry to a seat on the Federal Election Commission was not confirmed until 1979.

    Although none of President Carter's nominations was rejected on the Senate floor, several nominations were killed in committee, either through direct vote or by inaction. Opposition to some nominees was strong enough to force Carter to withdraw their names. Notable among this category was Theodore Sorensen, nominated in 1977 as director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Sorensen withdrew his name from consideration when it appeared likely that his nomination would embroil the fledgling Carter administration in a damaging confirmation fight.

    Senate Republicans, hoping to keep as many appointments as possible open for President-elect Reagan, managed to defer action on many presidential nominees at the end of the second session of the 96th Congress.

    Except for some vacancies that President Carter filled by using his power to make “recess” appointments, 113 nominations, including 17 prospective federal judges, were left unconfirmed by the Senate.

    By threatening opposition on the floor, the GOP senators held up action on the five members of the Legal Services Corporation, submitted June 23 for Senate approval, as well as nominees for the National Labor Relations Board.

    Also blocked were four appointments to the board of the Public Broadcasting Corporation, an appointment to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a nomination to the U.S. Parole Commission and the circuit and district judges.

    Of the 3,934 civilian nominations Carter sent to the Senate in 1980, 3,811 were confirmed. One hundred thirteen failed to win Senate approval and another 10 were withdrawn.

    Who Is Controversial?

    Objections to a nominee generally fall into four categories:

    • Personally ObnoxiousSenators sometimes object to appointees for patronage reasons—for example, when a nomination to a local federal job is made without consulting senators of the state concerned. Then a senator may use the objection that the nominee is “personally obnoxious” to him. Usually other senators join in blocking the nomination out of courtesy to their colleague. A variation of that sort of objection occurred in 1977 when the Republican leadership opposed the nomination of Samuel D. Zagoria to a Republican vacancy on the Federal Election Commission. The GOP leaders had not recommended Zagoria for the job and they charged that Carter broke his pledge to appoint Republican nominees only from among those the GOP leadership endorsed. Carter eventually was forced to withdraw Zagoria's name.
    • Conflict of InterestAnother common Senate objection to a nominee is alleged conflict of interest. This charge may be made if the nominee holds stock in, draws a pension from, or is otherwise connected with a company dealing with the agency to which he has been appointed. In such cases, the nominee often divests himself of the stock or severs his connection with the company.
    • Partisan PoliticsMany—perhaps most—of the controversies over nominations arise from partisan politics or from disagreements between liberals and conservatives. Such an incident occurred in 1978 when Republicans used the nomination of Benjamin R. Civiletti as deputy attorney general to try to embarrass the Carter administration over its role in the so-called “Marston affair.” A Republican U.S. attorney in Pennsylvania, David Marston, had been fired; Senate Republicans charged that the Democratic administration had let him go in an effort to stop an investigation into alleged criminal activities of two Democratic members of Congress from Pennsylvania. Civiletti won confirmation and the Democrat named to replace Marston continued the investigations.
    • IssuesNomination controversies occasionally reflect senators' disagreements about major issues of the times. Carter's nomination in 1977 of Paul C. Warnke as chief negotiator at the U.S.-Soviet strategic arms limitation talks and the nomination in 1979 of former United Auto Workers President Leonard Woodcock as the first U.S. ambassador to the People's Republic of China raised that kind of controversy.

    Below are brief accounts of the major controversial nominations from 1977 through 1980.

    1977
    Griffin B. Bell

    Although his nomination as attorney general was never considered to be in real jeopardy, Bell emerged in January as President Carter's most controversial Cabinet selection. Representatives of civil rights and minority groups were anxious to expose what they considered to be Bell's weak civil rights record. The disclosure that Bell, a prosperous Atlanta attorney and longtime Carter friend, belonged to private clubs that excluded from membership blacks, Jews and other minorities further fueled criticisms. Bell was nonetheless confirmed Jan. 25 by a 75-21 vote.

    Joseph A. Califano Jr.

    Despite the lopsided 95-1 Senate vote Jan. 24 in his favor, Califano's nomination as secretary of health, education and welfare drew fire because of his strong opposition to federal funding of abortions. Califano sought to reassure his critics by stating that, regardless of his personal reservations, he would, as secretary, uphold all laws permitting federal financing of abortions.

    Lynn R. Coleman

    Nominated to be general counsel of the Energy Department in 1977, Coleman was not confirmed until 1978. Coleman came under attack for his close ties to the energy industry. He had been a lawyer in the Washington office of Vinson and Elkins, a Texas law firm that included among its partners former Treasury Secretary and Texas Gov. John B. Connally and that represented many of the largest oil and gas companies.

    Citing possible conflicts of interest, Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum, D-Ohio, moved May 9, 1978, to kill Coleman's nomination by sending it back to committee. That motion was defeated, 20-75, and the Senate then confirmed Coleman by voice vote.

    Marion Edey

    The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Oct. 17, voted 8-4 to adopt a motion by James A. McClure, R-Idaho, to postpone indefinitely Edey's nomination to be a member of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). McClure claimed Edey, former head of the League of Conservation Voters, was not qualified for the CEQ post. The League, which rated members on environmental issues, had given McClure a rating of three out of a possible score of 100.

    Carol Tucker Foreman

    Foreman's nomination to be assistant secretary of agriculture for food and consumer services ran into some trouble in the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee. Opposition focused on the fear that Foreman, the former executive director of the Consumer Federation of America, would undercut farmers' interests in favor of consumers. Sens. Carl T. Curtis, R-Neb., and Robert Dole, R-Kan., forced a delay in the committee's vote on the nomination, but on March 21 the panel approved Foreman for the post. The full Senate confirmed her by voice vote March 24.

    Kent F. Hansen

    The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Oct. 17 rejected by a 7-4 vote Hansen's nomination as a member of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Gary Hart, D-Colo., chairman of the Nuclear Regulation Subcommittee, took the lead in opposing Hansen, expressing concern about a “possible conflict of interest” because Hansen had acted as a consultant to Westinghouse Electric and General Electric on nuclear issues. Hart also said he was concerned that Hansen, a professor of nuclear engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, lacked experience in policy matters.

    F. Ray Marshall

    Carter's nominee for secretary of labor was opposed by 20 Senate conservatives because of Marshall's strong support for several major labor proposals, including such long-sought goals as repeal of Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley act, which permitted states to enact “right-to-work” laws banning union shops, and legislation to legalize “common-site” picketing at construction sites. A Texas economics professor with strong backing from labor and civil rights groups, Marshall was confirmed Jan. 24.

    John W. McGarry

    Seventeen months elapsed between the time McGarry was nominated to a Democratic vacancy on the politically sensitive Federal Election Commission and the date he was formally confirmed. Carter first submitted McGarry's nomination in September 1977. Republicans and Common Cause criticized the former Boston lawyer's close ties to House Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., D-Mass. The Senate Rules Committee postponed hearings on McGarry and another controversial FEC nominee, Samuel D. Zagoria, in November. (Zagoria nomination, p. 1123)

    Carter resubmitted McGarry's nomination in 1978. The Rules Committee approved it by a 7-2 vote Aug. 25, even though committee hearings had exposed discrepancies between the financial disclosure statements McGarry, then special counsel for the House Administration Committee, had filed with the clerk of the House and his income tax returns. Still concerned by his friendship with O'Neill, the GOP leadership threatened a filibuster, thus preventing Senate consideration of the nomination in the final days of the session.

    Carter renewed the controversy Oct. 25 by naming McGarry to a recess appointment, a move that brought an angry response from the man on the FEC whom McGarry was to replace, former Michigan Democratic Chairman Neil Staebler. Staebler filed an unsuccessful lawsuit against McGarry, contending that Staebler should not be replaced until his successor was confirmed by the Senate. The Senate ended the controversy Feb. 21, 1979, confirming McGarry by voice vote.

    Monroe G. McKay

    The nomination of the brother of a sitting congressman drew controversy in November. McKay, a law professor at Brigham Young University and brother of Rep. Gunn McKay, D-Utah, was nominated as a judge to the U.S. Court of Appeals, 10th Circuit. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, opposed the nomination and was able to persuade the Senate Judiciary Committee to delay reporting McKay's nomination pending further hearings. After the hearings were held, the panel reported McKay favorably and the Senate confirmed his nomination Nov. 29.

    Robert Mendelsohn

    President Carter Nov. 14 withdrew Mendelsohn's nomination as assistant secretary of the interior for management, program and budget, pending court action on his alleged violation of California's campaign disclosure law. The California Fair Political Practices Commission had filed a civil suit against the San Francisco supervisor after its investigation failed to reach a finding on questions about campaign fund raising for his unsuccessful 1974 Democratic primary campaign for state controller. After Mendelsohn was cleared of the charges, Carter June 5, 1978, appointed him as assistant to Interior Secretary Cecil D. Andrus, a post that did not require Senate confirmation.

    Charles F. C. Ruff

    Sen. Robert Dole, R-Kan., was the principal opponent of the former Watergate special prosecutor's nomination to be deputy inspector general of the Health, Education and Welfare Department. Dole charged that as special prosecutor Ruff had waited until three weeks before the 1976 presidential election to clear publicly then-President Ford of allegations that he had used union campaign contributions for personal purposes while a member of the House. Dole was Ford's 1976 running mate. The Finance Committee cleared Ruff's nomination Oct. 17 after Dole withdrew his opposition. The Senate confirmed Ruff by voice vote Oct. 19.

    Theodore C. Sorensen

    From the first disclosure that Sorensen was Carter's choice as CIA director, support for the former Kennedy aide was less than enthusiastic. Conservatives mobilized an intense campaign against the nomination, stressing Sorensen's inexperience in foreign affairs, his allegedly casual attitude toward the use of classified material and his request in 1948 for draft classification as a non-combatant. He was apparently also injured by the revelation that he had argued the nation would not be harmed by publication of the Pentagon Papers in 1971.

    Despite a warning from Majority Leader Robert c. Byrd, D-W.Va., that the nomination was in “serious difficulty,” members of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee were visibly astonished when, on the first day of his confirmation hearings Jan. 17, Sorensen announced that he had asked Carter to withdraw his nomination. Carter subsequently nominated Adm. Stansfield Turner as CIA director; his nomination was confirmed Feb. 24.

    Robert D. Thorne

    Environmentalists delayed but did not kill confirmation of Thorne as assistant secretary for energy technology at the Department of Energy. The controversy centered on Thorne's role as head of the San Francisco office of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) during a 1976 campaign in California over a referendum to limit nuclear power; the referendum lost by a 2-1 margin. Environmentalists charged that the San Francisco ERDA office had mounted a pro-nuclear, anti-referendum campaign. The Senate Energy Committee delayed action on the nomination in 1977 while the charges were investigated.

    In a Jan. 27, 1978, report, the General Accounting Office concluded that although the ERDA office had undertaken such a campaign, it was just following orders from Washington. The Senate Energy Committee recommended Thorne's confirmation April 11 by a 15-3 vote and the full Senate confirmed him May 4 by voice vote. A threatened floor challenge by Sen. James Abourezk, D-S.D., never materialized.

    Donald L. Tucker

    Faced with near-unanimous opposition in the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, President Carter Oct. 3 withdrew Tucker's nomination to the Civil Aeronautics Board. The action followed a Commerce Committee staff investigation allegedly linking Tucker to a series of questionable financial deals. The investigation had been prompted by the results of the FBI check routinely made on nominees. Tucker, Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, was the first Florida Democrat to endorse Carter for president.

    Irby Turner Jr.

    Turner's nomination to a seat on the board of directors of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting drew fire from national civil rights groups. They charged that during his service on the Mississippi Authority for Educational Television he had been insensitive to the need for minority-oriented programming on the state's public television stations. The Senate refused to act on Turner's nomination before the end of 1977, and Carter did not resubmit his name in 1978.

    Paul C. Warnke

    Warnke's nomination as chief U.S. delegate to the strategic arms limitation talks (SALT) with the Soviet Union and as director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency drew fire from defense hard-liners who objected to his so-called “soft” views on arms control. After four days of sometimes acrimonious debate, the Senate confirmed Warnke March 29 by a 58-40 vote. Senate approval was due in large measure to personal lobbying by President Carter. (Details, p. 137)

    Samuel D. Zagoria/Max L. Friedersdorf

    Carter's nomination of Zagoria to the bipartisan Federal Election Commission (FEC) was to prove particularly trouble-some. A former aide to Sen. Clifford P. Case, R-N.J., Zagoria had not been recommended for the Republican vacancy on the FEC either by Senate Minority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr., R-Tenn., or by House Minority Leader John J. Rhodes, R-Ariz. They immediately charged that Carter had reneged on his pledge to pick Republican nominees from a leadership-approved list.

    Carter resubmitted Zagoria's nomination early in 1978, but Rhodes and Baker continued to refuse to accept a nominee who had not been recommended by them, and Carter eventually withdrew Zagoria's name Aug. 15. (Zagoria subsequently won confirmation for a slot on the Consumer Product Safety Commission.)

    To fill the GOP slot on the FEC, Carter Oct. 10 nominated Friedersdorf, a former White House legislative liaison who had been recommended by GOP congressional leaders. But the Senate Rules Committee did not act until 1979. The full Senate confirmed Friedersdorf Feb. 21, 1979, by voice vote.

    1978
    Benjamin R. Civiletti

    Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on Civiletti's nomination as deputy attorney general quickly turned into a discussion of the so-called “Marston affair.” Committee Republicans demanded to know the role that Civiletti, then assistant attorney general for the Justice Department's criminal division, and Attorney General Griffin B. Bell had played in the firing of David Marston, U.S. attorney for the eastern district of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia).

    Marston, a Republican, had been told to leave by Carter, upon Bell's recommendation. Carter's action followed a Nov. 4, 1977, telephone call from Rep. Joshua M. Eilberg, D-Pa. Marston charged that Carter and Bell had succumbed to political pressure in an effort to stop an investigation into criminal charges against Eilberg and Rep. Daniel J. Flood, D-Pa. Judiciary Republicans quizzed Civiletti about the events.

    Though the controversy continued on the Senate floor, Civiletti won confirmation May 9 on a 72-22 vote. Marston tried to capitalize on the publicity he received by running for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, but finished third in a field of six. To replace Marston, Carter nominated Peter F. Vaira, a Democrat. He was confirmed easily and continued the Marston investigations on Flood and Eilberg—producing indictments in the fall of 1978 against both men. (Eilberg, Flood indictments, Congress and Government chapter, p. 903)

    Carin Ann Clauss

    Numerous objections to the nomination of Clauss for a district judgeship in the District of Columbia caused the Judiciary Committee to refuse to report her name in 1978, and President Carter did not submit it again in 1979.

    Prior to the Sept. 19 nomination, the American Bar Association (ABA) attempted to block the consideration of Clauss, who was solicitor of the Labor Department. The ABA charged that Clauss' admitted lack of trial experience disqualified her for the job. The ABA screening panel for judicial nominees unanimously rejected her name when it was first offered in the spring of 1978. The ABA decision threw the nomination into limbo as Clauss attempted to gain further trial experience. The administration pledged to stand by her nomination, citing President Carter's desire to name more women and minority representatives to federal judgeships.

    Clauss' trial experience during the summer of 1978 later caused the ABA panel to reverse its rejection of her, according to news reports—but that same trial experience cast another cloud over her nomination. In a September 1978 opinion, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit criticized Clauss' office for its handling of an occupational safety case. The three-judge panel first criticized Labor Department lawyers—lawyers under Clauss' supervision—for filing a brief in August that was due in late April. The judges then added, “we register our most vigorous disapproval of the contumacious conduct of counsel in this case.” They questioned the “competence of [government] counsel appearing in federal courts.” The strong opinion damaged one of Clauss' main arguments for the nomination, namely that she ran an efficient and effective staff in the solicitor's office.

    Lynn R. Coleman

    (See 1977 nomination, p. 1122)

    Bertram R. Cottine

    Senate conservatives who had declared war on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration opposed Cottine's nomination to be a member of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. Pointing to Cottine's position as policy assistant in the office of Eula T. Bingham, assistant labor secretary for occupational safety, conservatives claimed Cottine would not be objective in his decisions. Nonetheless, the Senate confirmed Cottine April 27 on a 56-33 vote.

    David G. Gartner

    A former aide to Minnesota Democratic Sens. Hubert and Muriel Humphrey, Gartner's nomination to a seat on the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) did not run into trouble until after his May 17 confirmation. During his confirmation hearings, Gartner voluntarily told the Senate Agriculture Committee that over a period of four years, Minneapolis grain magnate Dwayne Andreas had given $72,000 worth of stock to Gartner's four children. The stock was in Archer Davis Midland Inc., a major grain dealer regulated by the CFTC and chaired by Andreas, a longtime Humphrey financial supporter. During questioning, Gartner agreed to sell the stock and to disqualify himself from any CFTC decisions involving Andreas' firm. That promise satisfied the committee, and Gartner was quickly confirmed.

    However, criticism of the stockholdings and questions of conflict of interest rose when Gartner took his CFTC seat. The Agriculture Committee called him back for more hearings, and President Carter, reversing course, decided Gartner had to go. On June 26 Carter and Vice President Walter F. Mondale, who had recommended Gartner for the post, took the unusual step of publicly asking Gartner to resign. Pointing out that he had sold the stock and put the proceeds in trust for his children, Gartner refused to leave. He remained a CFTC member.

    John W. McGarry

    (See 1977 nomination, p. 1122)

    Norval Morris/Henry S. Dogin

    National Rifle Association opposition helped block confirmation of Morris as head of the Justice Department's Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA). Morris, dean of the University of Chicago law school since 1975, had criticized LEAA for what he called its overemphasis on “hardware.” The NRA particularly objected to his position favoring gun control. The Senate Judiciary Committee did not act on the nomination before the end of the session.

    Carter did not resubmit Morris' name in 1979, nominating Dogin instead. He was confirmed March 21, 1979. A former deputy administrator of the Drug Enforcement Agency, Dogin had been nominated in 1978 as a deputy LEAA administrator, but the Morris controversy delayed action on Dogin's confirmation as well.

    Donald E. O'Brien

    American Bar Association opposition did not stop the confirmation of O'Brien, a longtime Iowa Democratic official, to an Iowa district judgeship. The ABA opposed O'Brien on both political and judicial grounds. Politically, the ABA felt he was too partisan: O'Brien, once a member of the Democratic National Committee, was a twice-beaten Democratic congressional nominee, U.S. attorney for the northern district of Iowa in 1961-67, and a special counsel to a House Small Business Committee at the request of Chairman Neal Smith, D-Iowa, in 1978. Judicially, the ABA referred to incidents in O'Brien's service as Woodbury County, Iowa, attorney from 1955 to 1958.

    However, the Iowa Bar Association and the Iowa Judicial Selection Commission, established to provide merit selection of judges, had recommended O'Brien. Following a six-hour hearing in which the Senate Judiciary Committee grilled the ABA on its opposition, the panel voted to report O'Brien's name. After putting a temporary “hold” on the nomination pending further evidence, Sen. Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., withdrew his objections. The Senate then approved O'Brien by voice vote Oct. 4.

    Robert M. Sayre

    By a vote of 62-27, the Senate April 27 tabled a motion to recommit Sayre's nomination as ambassador to Brazil. The nomination was then confirmed by voice vote. The Sayre nomination was the only ambassadorial nomination to be challenged in 1978.

    The controversy centered on a 1972 incident in Panama, where Sayre was then U.S. ambassador, and involved Moises Torrijos, the Panamanian ambassador to Spain and brother of Gen. Omar Torrijos, ruler of Panama. American drug enforcement agents were preparing to arrest Moises Torrijos on drug-smuggling charges when his plane landed in the Canal Zone, which was under U.S. jurisdiction. Someone, however, informed Torrijos of the plan, and he changed his landing to a place outside U.S. jurisdiction.

    Moises Torrijos' drug-smuggling activities later were questioned by senators opposed to the Panama Canal treaties ratified early in 1978; they asked how a treaty could be concluded with a ruler whose brother was engaged in illegal drug trade. Many of these same senators later opposed the Sayre nomination, claiming that Sayre obstructed execution of the arrest warrant by informing Gen. Torrijos of the plan.

    Sayre told the Foreign Relations Committee that the CIA Panama chief had informed him of the arrest plans. When Sayre sought advice from his State Department superiors, they told him to communicate with Gen. Torrijos as part of the U.S. campaign to soothe then-ruffled Panamanian feelings over the slow pace of the negotiations on the treaties.

    Milton D. Stewart

    Despite questions about a possible conflict of interest, the Senate July 18 confirmed Stewart's nomination as chief counsel for advocacy in the Small Business Administration (SBA). The vote was 88-11. Stewart's supporters cited his long record of concern for small businesses, especially those owned by minorities. They also stressed the wide range of his support among SBA's constituents, and his familiarity with their needs. Opponents, led by Sen. Lowell P. Weicker Jr., R-Conn., conceded these points but questioned his role in the 1974 collapse of one small company, which was then taken over by another firm in which Stewart allegedly had an interest.

    Robert D. Thorne

    (See 1977 nomination, p. 1123)

    Samuel D. Zagoria

    (See 1977 nomination, p. 1123)

    1979
    Bailey Brown

    The question whether federal judges should be required to resign from all-white social clubs fired the debate over the nomination of U.S. District Judge Bailey Brown to a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Carter nominated Brown to the seat March 15. When questioned about his club membership by members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Brown said he would suspend his membership until he was convinced the club did not discriminate, but that he would not resign. The committee accepted Brown's compromise, but then went on to state its position that persons nominated to the federal bench should not belong to social clubs that practice discrimination.

    During floor debate Sept. 25 on the nomination, several liberal senators, led by Jacob K. Javits, R-N.Y., questioned whether Brown's decision to suspend—rather than to resign—his membership, was in line with the spirit of the committee's policy statement. Despite Javits' urging that the nomination be rejected, the Senate voted to confirm Brown by an 83-12 vote.

    Cornelia Kennedy

    The question of racial bias also spawned the controversy surrounding Carter's April 9 nomination of U.S. District Court Judge Kennedy to a second seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Several senators—including Judiciary Committee Chairman Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.—joined spokesmen for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and other civil rights groups in charging that Judge Kennedy tended to rule in civil rights cases against those asserting a civil rights violation. Sen. Alan K. Simpson, R-Wyo., and other law-makers disputed the accuracy of those criticisms, and the Senate agreed by voice vote Sept. 25 to confirm Kennedy.

    Robert “Bob” Krueger

    Carter's nomination April 26 of the former Democratic representative from Texas to be ambassador-at-large and coordinator for Mexican affairs was greeted with hostility by some lawmakers who accused Carter of creating the job especially for the one-term congressman who had narrowly lost to John Tower, R-Texas, in a bitter 1978 Senate race. Opponents of the nomination said Mexico did not have a similar at-large post in the United States and that it was not clear what Krueger would be doing. Despite the complaints, the Senate confirmed Krueger Oct. 22 by a 48-35 vote.

    Moon Landrieu

    A former New Orleans mayor, Landrieu was unanimously confirmed Sept. 12 as secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, despite some lawmakers' concerns about his links with private developers. When he left office in 1978 after two four-year terms as mayor, Landrieu joined Joseph C. Canizaro Interest Inc., a real estate development firm. As mayor, Landrieu had helped arrange a landswap and processed a federal grant for Canizaro's multimillion-dollar “Canal Place” renewal project.

    A former head of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, Landrieu received the nearly unanimous endorsement of urban officials, who lauded him as “a man from the trenches” already on intimate terms with cities and their needs.

    John W. McGarry

    (See 1977 nomination, p. 1122)

    Abner Mikva

    Beating back intense pressure from the gun lobby, the Senate Sept. 25 by a 58-31 vote confirmed Mikva's appointment to a seat on the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Carter had nominated the Democratic representative from Illinois to the prestigious judgeship May 25. Confirmation came despite efforts by some groups—primarily the National Rifle Association and senators sympathetic to its views—to deny Mikva the seat. The NRA had been a consistent foe of Mikva throughout his congressional career because of his outspoken support of gun control legislation.

    Frank P. Reiche

    Intra-party bickering temporarily delayed Reiche's confirmation to a GOP vacancy on the six-member Federal Election Commission (FEC). Reiche, a Princeton lawyer and chairman of the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission, was nominated May 1 from a list of names supplied by Republican congressional leaders. However, at the request of freshman GOP Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey, N.H., the Senate Rules Committee June 6 postponed for a week the vote on Reiche. Humphrey questioned Reiche's views on a number of issues, including public financing of congressional elections, and complained that some of Reiche's opinions were too close to the views of the Democrats sitting on the bipartisan FEC.

    Humphrey won no support, and the Rules Committee reported Reiche's name to the full Senate unanimously. But that did not end the squabbling. Humphrey and 13 other senators asked that floor action be delayed until after the July 4 recess. When the Senate finally took up the nomination July 25, Reiche was confirmed by a 73-25 vote. The opposition included 21 of the Senate's 41 Republicans.

    George M. Seignious II

    The Senate March 1 confirmed Seignious as director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency by voice vote, but not before foreign policy hard-liners had complained that the nomination of the retired general was a Carter administration ploy to improve prospects for Senate ratification of a U.S.-Soviet strategic arms limitation treaty (SALT II). Arms control advocates also criticized the nomination, expressing concern that Seignious' 31 years in military life would run counter to his mission as head of the arms control agency. They argued that the former general would bend the agency toward traditional military approaches to U.S. security, stressing more weapons, rather than emphasizing the search for security through arms limitation.

    L. T. Senter Jr.

    The Senate confirmed Senter's nomination to be a federal district judge for the northern district of Mississippi Dec. 21, despite charges that he had engaged in racially biased actions. Opponents, led by Jacob K. Javits, R-N.Y., a longtime civil rights proponent, charged that Senter had used racist remarks. They also questioned his decision to send his children to an all-white private academy. Senter was confirmed by a vote of 43-25, a margin that observers said was proof of the civil rights lobby's loss of power over the previous decade.

    Patricia M. Wald

    By a vote of 77-21 the Senate July 24 voted to confirm the nomination of Patricia M. Wald to a seat on the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Her confirmation was preceded by a host of charges from Republicans and conservatives that Wald's views on the rights of children, the mentally ill and other oppressed groups were too liberal. Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey, R-N.H., charged that the assistant attorney general for legislative affairs held views on children's rights that would undermine the concept of the family. Humphrey pointed particularly to Wald's suggestion that some children under age 18 might be mature enough to vote. Other lawmakers countered that Wald's outspoken advocacy of controversial issues was no reason to deny her confirmation.

    Leonard Woodcock

    The nomination of the first U.S. ambassador to the People's Republic of China became ensnared in the more general debate over U.S.-China relations. Nonetheless, the Senate confirmed Woodcock, head of the United States Liaison Office in Peking and former president of the United Auto Workers, by an 82-9 vote, Feb. 26.

    Although no one in the Senate challenged Woodcock's qualifications to be ambassador, a substantial number of Republicans argued for delaying his confirmation. Some said he should not be confirmed until Congress had passed legislation supporting future relations between the United States and Taiwan; others maintained he should not be confirmed while China was engaged in a war against Vietnam. But the Carter administration lobbied successfully to have the nomination approved before March 1, the date the United States and China were scheduled to exchange ambassadors.

    1980
    Stephen G. Breyer

    A political maneuver to ensure Republican support was instrumental in the confirmation of Breyer to a judgeship on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the first circuit. In exchange for Republican support for Breyer, a Harvard University law professor and chief counsel of the Senate Judiciary Committee under Chairman Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., Kennedy agreed not to push for confirmation of 17 other Carter judicial nominations pending in the committee.

    Among those challenging the nomination on the floor was Sen. Robert Morgan, D-N.C., who had had one judicial candidate rejected earlier by the Judiciary Committee and another among the shelved nominations. Gordon J. Humphrey, R-N.H., also opposed the nomination. Breyer's judgeship was in the judicial circuit that included New Hampshire. Humphrey hoped to keep the seat open until Ronald Reagan could make the appointment.

    Approval of Breyer came Dec. 9 after the Senate voted 68-28 to invoke cloture and limit debate. The vote confirming him was 80-10.

    Robert S. Gershenson

    Republican Sen. Jesse A. Helms, R-N.C., blocked Carter's last minute appointment of Gershenson, deputy assistant secretary of state for personnel, as ambassador to Uruguay. Helms, a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, submitted to Gershenson a list of 42 questions about his involvement in the firings or promotions of several State Department employees. Gershenson told Helms he was not directly involved in the cases, but would “look into” the allegations. The committee took no further action on the nomination.

    Lyle E. Gramley

    Gramley was confirmed May 15 as a member of the board of governors of the Federal Reserve System after a three-month delay during which critics charged that President Carter had ignored a legal requirement that each of the central bank's governors come from a different district of the reserve system. Gramley began his career with the Fed in 1955 at the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank. But from 1964-77, he served as a staff economist at Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington. He left the bank to take a seat on Carter's Council of Economic Advisers. In approving Gramley's nomination by voice vote, the Senate adopted a resolution (S Res 434) warning that the Senate would not go along with such nominations in the future.

    Gen. David C. Jones

    The June 19 Senate vote of 66-9 confirming Jones to another two-year term as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was quick, even though conservatives Gordon J. Humphrey, R-N.H., and Jesse Helms, R-N.C., threatened to use Senate rules to delay final action. Humphrey and Helms opposed Jones because of his support for the Panama Canal treaties, the SALT II treaty and the decision to cancel the B-1 bomber.

    Controversy also surrounded Jones' confirmation because of rumors that he would not tender his resignation if Reagan were elected. After meeting with Sen. John W. Warner, R-Va., Jones said that he would go “gracefully” if asked by the president to resign. But he also said that he had no intention of submitting his resignation to a new president as political appointees routinely do when an administration changes because it would politicize his office and set a bad precedent.

    William A. Lubbers

    Senate conservatives concluded a four-day filibuster in an attempt to stop confirmation of Lubbers as general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board. The 57-39 vote April 23 confirmed Lubbers, a long-time NLRB employee, despite arguments that he was too friendly to labor unions to be an independent counsel. The filibuster was broken in a 62-24 vote to cut off debate on the nomination. An earlier attempt failed 46-40.

    Charles B. Winberry

    For the first time since 1938, the Senate Judiciary Committee rejected a federal judgeship nominee. By a 9-6 vote March 4, the panel refused to approve Winberry, Carter's nominee for a district judgeship in North Carolina's eastern district. Sen. Robert Morgan, D-N.C., had recommended Winberry, a politically well-connected lawyer from Rocky Mount, N.C., who was the senator's longtime friend and former campaign manager. Opponents, led by Democrat Patrict J. Leahy of Vermont and Republican Orrin G. Hatch of Utah, contended Winberry was not qualified because of alleged ethical indiscretions and lack of experience. The two senators pointed to allegations that in handling a 1976 cigarette mail fraud case, Winberry knew his client had accomplices but failed to inform the presiding judge, as legal canons required. Senators also said Winberry violated legal ethics when he wrote a letter to a federal judge's law clerk during a pending case without notifying the opposing side.

    Don Alan Zimmerman

    The Senate Aug. 5 confirmed Zimmerman by a 68-27 vote as a member of the National Labor Relations Board despite opponents' warnings that he would tip the balance on the board toward labor. Although no law required the president to keep the five-member regulatory panel in political balance, it had been traditional to do so since President Eisenhower established the practice. Zimmerman, a political independent, was nominated to fill a vacancy on the board created by the resignation of Betty Southard Murphy, a Republican.

    Selected Presidential Messages
    Gerald R. Ford's 1977 State of the Union Message

    Following is the text of President Ford's final State of the Union address, delivered to a joint session of Congress Jan. 12, 1977.

    TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:

    In accordance with the Constitution, I come before you once again to report on the State of the Union.

    This report will be my last, maybe.

    But for the Union, it is only the first of such reports in our Third Century of Independence, the close of which none of us will ever see. We can be confident, however, that 100 years from now a freely elected President will come before a freely elected Congress chosen to renew our great Republic's pledge to Government of the people, by the people, and for the people.

    For my part, I pray the Third Century we are beginning will bring to all Americans, our children and their children's children, a greater measure of individual equality, opportunity and justice, a greater abundance of spiritual and material blessings, and a higher quality of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

    The State of the Union is a measurement of the many elements of which it is composed—a political union of diverse states, an economic union of varying interests, an intellectual union of common convictions and a moral union of immutable ideals.

    Taken in sum, I can report that the State of the Union is good. There is room for improvement as always, but today we have a more perfect union than when my stewardship began.

    As a people, we discovered that our Bicentennial was much more than a celebration of the past; it became a joyous reaffirmation of all that it means to be Americans, a confirmation before all the world of the vitality and durability of our free institutions.

    I am proud to have been privileged to preside over the affairs of our Federal Government during these eventful years when we proved, as I said in my first words upon assuming office, that “our Constitution works; our Great Republic is a Government of laws and not of men; here, the people rule.”

    The people have spoken; they have chosen a new President and a new Congress to work their will; I congratulate you—particularly the new members—as sincerely as I did President-elect Carter. In a few days, it will be his duty to outline for you his priorities and legislative recommendations. Tonight, I will not infringe on that responsibility, but rather wish him the very best in all that is good for our country.

    During the period of my own service in this Capitol and in the White House I can recall many orderly transitions of governmental responsibility—of problems as well as of position, of burdens as well as of power. The genius of the American system is that we do this so naturally and so normally; there are no soldiers marching in the streets except in the Inaugural Parade; no public demonstrations except for some of the dancers at the Inaugural Ball; the opposition party doesn't go underground but goes on functioning vigorously in the Congress and the country; and our vigilant press goes right on probing and publishing our faults and our follies, confirming the wisdom of the framers of the First Amendment.

    Because the transfer of authority in our form of government affects the state of the union, and of the world, I am happy to report to you that the current transition is proceeding very well. I was determined that it should; I wanted the new President to get off to an easier start than I had.

    When I became President on August 9, 1974, our Nation was deeply divided and tormented. In rapid succession, the Vice President and the President had resigned in disgrace. We are still struggling with the after-effects of a long, unpopular and bloody war in Southeast Asia. The economy was unstable and racing toward the worst recession in 40 years. People were losing jobs. The cost of living was soaring. The Congress and the Chief Executive were at loggerheads. The integrity of our Constitutional process and of other institutions was being questioned.

    For more than 15 years, domestic spending had soared as Federal programs multiplied and the expense escalated annually. During the same period, our national security needs were steadily shortchanged.

    In the grave situation which prevailed in August 1974, our will to maintain our international leadership was in doubt.

    I asked for your prayers, and went to work.

    In January 1975, I reported to the Congress that the state of the union was not good. I proposed urgent action to improve the economy and to achieve energy independence in ten years. I reassured America's allies and sought to reduce the danger of confrontation with potential adversaries. I pledged a new direction for America.

    Nineteen seventy-five was a year of difficult decisions, but Americans responded with realism, common sense and self-discipline.

    By January 1976, we were headed in a new direction, which I hold to be the right direction for a free society. I was guided by the belief that successful problem-solving requires more than Federal action alone; that it involves a full partnership among all branches and levels of government, and public policies which nurture and promote the creative energies of private enterprises, institutions and individual citizens.

    A year ago, I reported that the state of the union was better—in many ways a lot better—but still not good enough.

    Common sense told me to stick to the steady course we were on, to continue to restrain the inflationary growth of government, to reduce taxes as well as spending, to return local decisions to local officials, to provide for long-range sufficiency in energy and national security needs. I resisted the immense pressures of an election year to open the floodgates of Federal money and the temptation to promise more than I could deliver. I told it as it was to the American people and demonstrated to the world that, in our spirited political competition, as in this chamber, Americans can disagree without being disagreeable.

    Signs of Progress

    Now, after 30 months as your President I can say that while we still have a way to go, I am proud of the long way we have come together.

    I am proud of the part I have had in rebuilding confidence in the Presidency, confidence in our free system and confidence in our future. Once again, Americans believe in themselves, in their leaders, and in the promise that tomorrow holds for their children.

    I am proud that today America is at peace. None of our sons are fighting and dying in battle anywhere in the world. And the chance for peace among all nations is improved by our determination to honor our vital commitments in the defense of peace and freedom.

    I am proud that the United States has strong defenses, strong alliances and a sound and courageous foreign policy.

    —Our alliances with our major partners, the great industrial democracies of Western Europe, Japan, and Canada, have never been more solid. Consultations on mutual security, defense and East-West relations have grown closer. Collaboration has branched out into new fields, such as energy, economic policy and relations with the Third World.

    We have used many avenues for cooperation, including summit meetings held among major allied countries. The friendship of the democracies is deeper, warmer and more effective than at any time in 30 years.

    —We are maintaining stability in the strategic nuclear balance, and pushing back the spectre of nuclear war. A decisive step forward was taken in the Vladivostok Accord which I negotiated with General Secretary Brezhnev—joint recognition that an equal ceiling should be placed on the number of strategic weapons on each side.

    With resolve and wisdom on the part of both nations, a good agreement is well within reach this year.

    —The framework for peace in the Middle East has been built. Hopes for future progress in the Middle East were stirred by the historic agreements we reached and the trust and confidence we formed.

    —Thanks to American leadership, the prospects for peace in the Middle East are brighter than they have been in three decades. The Arab states and Israel continue to look to us to lead them from confrontation and war to a new era of accommodation and peace. We have no alternative but to persevere and I'am sure we will. The opportunities for a final settlement are great, and the price of failure is a return to the bloodshed and hatred that for too long have brought tragedy to all the peoples of this area, and repeatedly edged the world to the brink of war.

    —Our relationship with the People's Republic of China is proving its importance and its durability. We are finding more and more common ground between our two countries on basic questions of international affairs.

    In my two trips to Asia as President, we have reaffirmed America's continuing vital interest in the peace and security of Asia and the Pacific Basin, established a new partnership with Japan, confirmed our dedication to the security of Korea, and reinforced our ties with the free nations of Southeast Asia.

    —An historic dialogue has begun between industrial nations and the developing nations. Most proposals on the table are the initiatives of the United States, including those on food, energy, technology, trade, investment and commodities. We are well launched on this process of shaping positive and reliable economic relations between rich nations and poor nations over the long-term.

    —We have made progress in trade negotiations and avoided protectionism during recession. We strengthened the international monetary system. During the past two years the free world's most important economic powers have already brought about important changes that serve both developed and developing economies. The momentum already achieved must be nurtured and strengthened, for the prosperity of rich and poor depends upon it.

    —In Latin America, our relations have taken on a new maturity and a sense of common enterprise.

    —In Africa, the quest for peace, racial justice and economic progress is at a crucial point. The United States, in close cooperation with the United Kingdom, is actively engaged in that historic process. Will change come about by warfare and chaos and foreign intervention? Or will it come about by negotiated and fair solutions, ensuring majority rule, minority rights and economic advance? America is committed to the side of peace and justice, and to the principle that Africa should shape its own future free of outside intervention.

    —American leadership has helped to stimulate new international efforts to stem the proliferation of nuclear weapons and to shape a comprehensive treaty governing the use of the oceans.

    I am gratified by these accomplishments. They constitute a record of broad success for America, and for the peace and prosperity of all mankind. This Administration leaves to its successor a world in better condition than we found. We leave, as well, a solid foundation for progress on a range of issues that are vital to the well-being of America.

    What has been achieved in the field of foreign affairs, and what can be accomplished by the new administration, demonstrate the genius of Americans working together for the common good. It is this, our remarkable ability to work together, that has made us a unique nation. It is Congress, the President, and the people striving for a better world.

    I know all patriotic Americans want this Nation's foreign policy to succeed.

    I urge members of my party in this Congress to give the new President loyal support in this area.

    I express the hope that this new Congress will re-examine its constitutional role in international affairs.

    The exclusive right to declare war, the duty to advise and consent on the part of the Senate, and the power of the purse on the part of the House, are ample authority for the legislative branch and should be jealously guarded.

    But because we may have been too careless of these powers in the past does not justify congressional intrusion into, or obstruction of, the proper exercise of Presidential responsibilities now or in the future. There can be only one Commander-in-Chief. In these times crises cannot be managed and wars cannot be waged by committee. Nor can peace be pursued solely by parliamentary debate. To the ears of the world, the President speaks for the Nation. While he is, of course, ultimately accountable to Congress, the courts and the people, he and his emissaries must not be handicapped in advance in their relations with foreign governments as has sometimes happened in the past.

    Economic Recovery

    At home, I am encouraged by the Nation's recovery from the recession and our steady return to sound economic growth. It is now continuing after the recent period of uncertainty, which is part of the price we pay for free elections.

    Our most pressing need today and in the future is more jobs—productive and permanent jobs created by a thriving economy.

    We must revise our tax system both to ease the burden of heavy taxation and to encourage the investment necessary for the creation of productive jobs for all Americans who want to work. Earlier this month I proposed a permanent income tax reduction of ten billion dollars below current levels including raising the personal exemption from $750 to $1,000. I also recommended a series of measures to stimulate investment, such as accelerated depreciation for new plants and equipment in areas of high unemployment, a reduction in the corporate tax rate from 48 to 46 percent, and eliminating the present double taxation of dividends. I strongly urge the Congress to pass these measures to help create the productive, permanent jobs in the private economy that are essential to our future. All of the basic trends are good; we are not on the brink of another recession or economic disaster. If we follow prudent policies that encourage productive investment and discourage destructive inflation, we will come out on top, and I'm sure we will.

    We have successfully cut inflation by more than half: when I took office, the Consumer Price Index was rising at 12.2 percent a year. During 1976, the rate of inflation was five percent.

    We have created more jobs. Over four million more people have jobs today than in the spring of 1975. Throughout this nation today we have over 88 million people in useful, productive jobs—more than at any other time in our nation's history. But, there are still too many Americans unemployed. This is the greatest regret that I have as I leave office.

    We brought about with the Congress, after much delay, the renewal of general revenue sharing. We expanded community development and federal manpower programs. We began a significant urban mass transit program. Federal programs today provide more funds for our states and local governments than ever before—$70-billion for the current fiscal year.

    Through these programs and others that provide aid directly to individuals we have kept faith with our tradition of compassionate help for those who need it. As we begin our third century we can be proud of the progress we have made in meeting human needs for all of our citizens.

    We have cut the growth of crime by nearly 90 percent. Two years ago, crime was increasing at a rate of 18 percent annually. In the first three quarters of 1976, that growth rate had been cut to two percent. But crime, and the fear of crime, remains one of the most serious problems facing our citizens.

    We have had some successes. And there have been some disappointments.

    Bluntly, I must remind you that we have not made satisfactory progress toward achieving energy independence.

    Energy

    Energy is absolutely vital to the defense of our country, to the strength of our economy, and to the quality of our lives. Two years ago I proposed to the Congress the first comprehensive national energy program:

    A specific and coordinated set of measures that would end our vulnerability to embargo, blockade, or arbitrary price increases, and would mobilize U.S. technology and resources to supply a significant share of the free world's energy needs after 1985.

    Of the major energy proposals I submitted two years ago, only half belatedly became law. In 1973, we were dependent upon foreign oil imports for 36 percent of our needs. Today we are 40 percent dependent, and we'll pay out 34 billion U.S. dollars for foreign oil this year. Such vulnerability at present or in the future is intolerable and must be ended.

    The answer to where we stand on our national energy effort today reminds me of the old argument over whether the tank is half full or half empty. The pessimist will say we have half failed to achieve our ten-year energy goals, the optimist will say that we have half succeeded. I am always an optimist, but we must make up for lost time.

    We have laid a solid foundation for completing the enormous task which confronts us. I have signed into law five major energy bills which contain significant measures for conservation, resource development, stockpiling and standby authorities.

    We have moved forward to develop the Naval Petroleum Reserves; to build a five hundred-million barrel strategic petroleum stockpile; to phase-out unnecessary government allocation and price controls; to develop a lasting relationship with other oil consuming nations; to improve the efficiency of energy use through conservation in automobiles, buildings and industry; and to expand research on new technology and renewable resources, such as wind power, geothermal and solar energy.

    All these actions, significant as they are for the long term, are only the beginning. I recently submitted to the Congress my proposals to reorganize the federal energy structure, and the hard choices which remain if we are serious about reducing our dependence upon foreign energy.

    These include programs to reverse our declining production of natural gas and increase incentives for domestic crude oil production. I propose to minimize environmental uncertainties affecting coal development, expand nuclear power generation and create an energy independence authority to provide government financial assistance for vital energy programs where private capital is not available.

    We must explore every reasonable prospect for meeting our energy needs when our current domestic reserves of oil and natural gas begin to dwindle in the next decade.

    I urgently ask Congress and the new Administration to move quickly on these issues. This Nation has the resources and capability to achieve our energy goals if its government has the will to proceed and I think we do.

    Reorganization

    I have been disappointed by inability to complete many of the meaningful organizational reforms which I contemplated for the Federal Government, although a start has been made.

    For example, the Federal Judicial System has long served as a model for other courts. But today it is threatened by a shortage of qualified Federal judges and an explosion of litigation claiming Federal jurisdiction.

    I commend to the new Administration and the Congress the recent report and recommendations of the Department of Justice, undertaken at my request, on “the needs of the Federal Courts.” I especially endorse its proposals for a new commission on the judicial appointment process.

    While the Judicial Branch of our Government may require reinforcement, the budgets and payrolls of the other branches remain staggering. I cannot help but observe that while the White House Staff and the Executive Office of the President have been reduced and the total number of civilians in the Executive Branch contained during the 1970s, the Legislative Branch has increased substantially, although the membership of the Congress remains at 535. Congress now costs the taxpayers more than a million dollars a year per member; the whole Legislative budget has passed the billion dollar mark.

    I set out to reduce the growth in the size and spending of the Federal Government, but no President can accomplish this alone. The Congress sidetracked most of my requests for authority to consolidate overlapping programs and agencies, to return more decision-making and responsibility to State and local governments through block grants instead of rigid categorical programs and to eliminate unnecessary red tape and outrageously complex regulations.

    We have made some progress in cutting back the expansion of Government and its intrusion into individual lives—but believe me, there is much more to be done and you and I know it. It can only be done by tough and temporarily painful surgery by a Congress as prepared as the President to face up to this very real political problem.

    Again, I wish my successor, working with a substantial majority of his own party, the best of success in reforming the costly and cumbersome machinery of the Federal Government.

    The task of self-government is never finished. The problems are great; the opportunities are greater.

    Defense

    America's first goal is and always will be peace with honor. America must remain first in keeping peace in the world. We can remain first in peace only if we are never second in defense.

    In presenting the State of the Union to the Congress and to the American people, I have a special obligation as Commander-in-Chief to report on our national defense. Our survival as a free and independent people requires, above all, strong military forces that are well-equipped and highly trained to perform their assigned mission.

    I am particularly gratified to report that over the past two and a half years we have been able to reverse the dangerous decline of the previous decade in the real resources this country was devoting to national defense. This was an immediate problem I faced in 1974. The evidence was unmistakable that the Soviet Union had been steadily increasing the reources it applied to building its military strength.

    During this same period the United States' real defense spending declined. In my three budgets, we not only arrested that dangerous decline, but we have established the positive trend which is essential to our ability to contribute to peace and stability in the world.

    The Vietnam War both materially and psychologically affected our overall defense posture. The dangerous antimilitary sentiment discouraged defense spending and unfairly disparaged the men and women who served in our armed forces.

    The challenge that now confronts this country is whether we have the national will and determination to continue this essential defense effort over the long term, as it must be continued. We can no longer afford to oscillate from year to year in so vital a matter. Indeed, we have a duty to look beyond the immediate question of budgets, and to examine the nature of the problem we will face over the next generation.

    I am the first recent President able to address long-term basic issues without the burden of Vietnam. The war in Indochina consumed enormous resources, at the very time that the overwhelming strategic superiority we once enjoyed was disappearing. In past years, as a result of decisions by the United States, our strategic forces levelled off. Yet the Soviet Union continued a steady, constant buildup of its own forces, committing a high percentage of its national economic effort to defense.

    The United States can never tolerate a shift in the strategic balance against us, or even a situation where the American people or our allies believe the balance is shifting against us. The United Staes would risk the most serious political consequences if the world came to believe that our adversaries have a decisive margin of superiority. To maintain a strategic balance we must look ahead to the 1980s and beyond. The sophistication of modern weapons requires that we make decisions now if we are to ensure our security ten years from now.

    Therefore I have consistently advocated and strongly urged that we pursue three critical strategic programs: the Trident missile launching submarine; the B-1 bomber, with its superior capability to penetrate modern air defenses; and a more advanced intercontinental ballistic missile that will be better able to survive nuclear attack and deliver a devastating retaliatory strike.

    In an era where the strategic nuclear forces are in rough equilibrium, the risks of conflict below the nuclear threshold may grow more perilous. A major long-term objective, therefore, is to maintain capabilities to deal with, and thereby deter, conventional challenges and crises, particularly in Europe.

    We cannot rely solely on strategic forces to guarantee our security or to deter all types of aggression. We must have superior Naval and Marine forces to maintain freedom of the seas, strong multipurpose tactical Air Forces, and mobile, modern ground forces.

    Accordingly: I have directed a long-term effort to improve our worldwide capabilities to deal with regional crises.

    —I have submitted a five year Naval building program indispensable to the Nation's maritime strategy.

    —Because the security of Europe and the integrity of NATO remain the cornerstone of American defense policy, I have initiated a special, long-term program to ensure the capacity of the alliance to deter or defeat aggression in Europe.

    As I leave office, I can report that our national defense is effectively deterring conflict today. Our Armed Forces are capable of carrying out the variety of missions assigned to them. Programs are underway which will assure we can deter war in the years ahead.

    But I also must warn that it will require a sustained effort over a period of years to maintain these capabilities. We must have the wisdom, the stamina and the courage to prepare today for the perils of tomorrow, and I believe we will.

    As I look to the future—and I assure you I intend to go on doing that for a good many years—I can say with confidence that the State of the Union is good, but we must go on making it better and better.

    This gathering symbolizes the Constitutional foundation which makes continued progress possible, synchronizing the skills of three independent branches of government, reserving fundamental sovereignty to the people of this great land.

    It is only as the temporary representatives and servants of the people that we meet here—we bring no hereditary status or gift of infallibility and none follows us from this place. Like President Washington, like the more fortunate of his successors, I look forward to the status of private citizen with gladness and gratitude. To me, being a citizen of the United States of America is the greatest honor and privilege in this world.

    From the opportunities which fate and my fellow citizens have given me, as a member of the House, as Vice President and President of the Senate, and as President of all the people, I have come to understand and to place the highest value on the checks and balances which our founders imposed on government through the separation of powers, among co-equal Legislative, Executive and Judicial Branches.

    This often results in difficulty and delay, as I well know, but it also places supreme authority under God, beyond any one person, any one branch, any majority great or small, or any one party. The Constitution is the bedrock of all our freedoms; guard and cherish it; keep honor and order in your own house; and the Republic will endure.

    It is not easy to end these remarks; in this chamber, along with some of you, I have experienced many, many of the highlights of my life. It was here that I stood 28 years ago with my freshman colleagues as Speaker Sam Rayburn administered the oath—I see some of you now, Charlie Bennett, Dick Bolling, Carl Perkins, Pete Rodino, Harley Staggers, Tom Steed, Sid Yates and Clem Zablocki, and I remember those who have gone to their rest.

    It was here we waged many, many a lively battle, won some, lost some, but always remaining friends. It was here surrounded by such friends, that the distinguished Chief Justice swore me in as Vice President on December 6, 1973. It was here I returned eight months later as your President to ask you not for a honeymoon, but for a good marriage.

    I will always treasure those memories and the many, many kindnesses. I thank you for them.

    My fellow Americans, I once asked for your prayers, and now I give you mine: May God guide this wonderful country, its people, and those they have chosen to lead them. May our third century be illuminated by liberty and blessed with brotherhood, so that we and all who come after us may be the humble servants of thy peace. Amen.

    Good night and God bless you.

    Inaugural Address of Jimmy Carter

    Following is the inaugural address of James Earl Carter, the 39th President of the United States, as it was delivered on Jan. 20, 1977:

    For myself and for our nation, I want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land.

    In this outward and physical ceremony we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation.

    As my high school teacher, Miss Julia Coleman, used to say, “We must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles.”

    Here before me is the Bible used in the inauguration of our first President in 1789, and I have just taken the oath of office on the Bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet Micah:

    “He hath showed me, o man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God.” (Micah 6:8)

    New Spirit

    This inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. A President may sense and proclaim that new spirit, but only a people can provide it.

    Two centuries ago our nation's birth was a milestone in the long quest for freedom, but the bold and brilliant dream which excited the founders of this nation still aw