Unilever’s Mission for Vitality

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David Austen-Smith, Adam Galinsky, Katherine H. Chung & Christy LaVanway

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  • Author Bio

    David Austen-Smith is the Peter G. Peterson Professor of Corporate Ethics, and Professor of Political Science and Economics. He received his PhD in economics from Cambridge University in 1978. He joined the Northwestern faculty from the University of Rochester in 1996, transferring to the Kellogg School as the Earl Dean Howard Professor of Political Economy in September 2004 from the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences where he was the Ethel and John Lindgren Professor. Austen-Smith is currently teaching “Strategic Crisis Management” and “Values-Based Leadership”. He is an elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory; he is also a charter member of the Game Theory Society. Austen-Smith has published widely on positive political theory, social choice and applied game theory.

    Adam Galinsky is currently the chair of the Management Division and the Vikram S. Pandit Professor of Business at the Columbia Business School.

    Professor Galinsky has published more than 200 scientific articles, chapters, and teaching cases in the fields of management and social psychology. His research and teaching focus on leadership, power, negotiations, decision-making, diversity, and ethics.

    Professor Galinsky co-authored the critically acclaimed and best-selling book, Friend & Foe (Penguin Random House, 2015). The book offers a radically new perspective on conflict and cooperation and has received uniformly positive reviews from the New York Times, Financial Times, The Economist, and INC. Scott Stossel, the editor of the Atlantic wrote, “A terrific book—full of fascinating and gee-whizzy studies and insights, with genuinely useful lessons for readers. It combines the best elements of a Malcolm Gladwell or Freakonomics book with the usefulness of smarter/better business books.”

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