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Gøsta Esping-Andersen

In: Welfare States in Transition: National Adaptations in Global Economies

Chapter 3: Welfare States without Work: The Impasse of Labour Shedding and Familialism in Continental European Social Policy

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Welfare States without Work: The Impasse of Labour Shedding and Familialism in Continental European Social Policy
Welfare states without work: The impasse of labour shedding and familialism in continental European social policy
GøstaEsping-Andersen

Imperial Gennany's social insurance refonns became the model for policy emulation in most European countries. As with Bismarck, social policy was motivated by concerns far removed from any egalitarianism. Chiefly, it was the creation of conservative elites who abhorred laissezfaire almost as much as the socialist menace, and who sought to rescue the old order with moral discipline, social pacification, and nation-building (Rimlinger, 1971; Flora and Alber, 1981). Bismarck's aim was not a welfare state but a welfare monarchy. In comparison with the universalistic egalitarian ideals that later came to define the British Beveridge ...

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