Section I: Sociohistorical Trauma, Transformation, and Dialogue: Dialogue Models for Transforming Sociohistorical Trauma Next Chapter

In: Transforming Historical Trauma Through Dialogue

Section I: Sociohistorical Trauma, Transformation, and Dialogue: Dialogue Models for Transforming Sociohistorical Trauma

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Sociohistorical Trauma, Transformation, and Dialogue: Dialogue Models for Transforming Sociohistorical Trauma
Sociohistorical trauma, transformation, and dialogue: Dialogue models for transforming sociohistorical trauma
Introduction to Section I

Interpersonal violence is a monologue—a disconnection from self and the world, a one-way conversation that silences the other and makes dialogue unsafe. The silencing can continue well after the initial violence ends, as recipients of violence and even their descendants become disempowered, lose their ability to grow and develop, and become disconnected from the world.

Interpersonal violence often leads to further violence. Recipients seek revenge and retaliate, creating ongoing cycles of perpetration and victimization. Perpetrators of violence may be no more well off than victims, often living in a state of disconnection, fear, uncertainty, and hypervigilance.

Interpersonal violence creates sociohistorical trauma, which is ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website