• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim are widely recognized as the trinity of sociological theory. While these three sociologists were trailblazing social theorists who enhanced the study of human behavior and its relationship to social institutions, other, more contemporary scholars were just as innovative — one of those scholars being W. E. B. Du Bois.

W. E. B. Du Bois was a political and literary giant of the 20th century, publishing over twenty books and thousand of essays and articles throughout his life. In The Social Theory of W. E. B. Du Bois, editor Phil Zuckerman assembles Du Bois's work from a wide variety of sources, including articles Du Bois published in newspapers, speeches he delivered, selections from well-known classics such as The Souls of ...

Chapter 1: Introduction

  • By: Theodore Abel, Bert Adams, R.A. Sydie, Jane Addams, Derrick Aldridge, Richard Altschuler, Heine Andersen, Lars Bo Kaspersen, Elijah Anderson, T. Anderson, William Andrews, David Ashley, David Michael Orenstein, Harry Elmer Barnes, Dipa Basu, Arthur Asa Berger, Peter Berger, James Blackwell, Morris Janowitz, Charles Booth, Edgar Borgatta, Henry Meyer, John Bracey, August Meier, Elliott Rudwick, Steven Brint, James LaValle, Francis Broderick, George Bryjak, Michael Soroka, Keith Byerman, Hazel Carby, Joel Charon, Joel Charon, Patricia Hill Collins, Randall Collins, Randall Collins, Michael Makowsky, John Curra, R. P. Cuzzort, E. W. King, Joseph DeMarco, Nigel Dodd, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, W. E. B. Du Bois, Emile Durkheim, Emile Durkheim, Emile Durkheim, D. Stanley Eitzen, Maxine Baca Zinn, Frederick Engels, Frantz Fanon, James Farganis, Joan Ferrante, E. Franklin Frazier, Mike Gane, Anthony Giddens, Anthony Giddens, Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Charelotte Perkins Gilman, Erich Goode, Dan Green, Edwin Driver, Robert Gregg, Richard Hadden, James Henslin, Thomas Holt, bell hooks, Charles Hurst, Atlas Jack Jones, Jacqueline Jones, Conrad Kanagy, Donald Kraybill, Jr. King, Martin Luther, Peter Kivisto, Peter Kivisto, Charles Lemert, Charles Lemert, Patricia Madoo Lengermann, Jil Niebrugge-Brantley, Vladimir Lenin, Julius Lester, Donald Levine, David Levering Lewis, David Levering Lewis, David Levering Lewis, John Macionis, Heinz Maus, Antonio McDaniel, Albert Memmi, C. Wright Mills, G. Duncan Mitchell, Ashely Montagu, Boaz Nalika Namasaki, David Newman, Michael Omi, Howard Winant, Fred Pampel, Jennifer Platt, Eugene F. Provenzo, George Ritzer, George Ritzer, George Ritzer, George Ritzer, Elliott Rudwick, Elliott Rudwick, Jon Shepard, D. Sibley, Georg Simmel, Pitrim Sorokin, Rodney Stark, Hermann Strasser, Alan Swingewood, Alex Thio, Jonathan Turner, Jonathan Turner, Leonard Beeghley, Immanuel Wallerstein, Max Weber, Charles Wesley, Evan Willis, Howard Winant, Shamoon Zamir, Irving Zeitlin, Phil Zuckerman, Sandra Barnes & Daniel Cady
  • In:The Social Theory of W.E.B. Du Bois
  • Chapter DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483328843.n1
  • Subject:Black Studies, Race & Ethnicity, American Social Theory
  • Keywords:color line; negro; pan-Africanism; sociologists; sociology; the philadelphia negro; the souls of black folk
Introduction
Introduction

As an undergraduate majoring in sociology, and subsequently as a graduate student pursuing advanced degrees in the same discipline, I was taught that there were essentially three founders of the discipline—three shapers, three intellectual visionaries, three seminal scholars who forged the theoretical backbone of sociology: Karl Marx (1818–1883) from Germany, Max Weber (1864–1920) from Germany, and Emile Durkheim (1858–1917) from France. These three Europeans who wrote in the latter half of the 19th century and—excluding Marx—into the early decades of the 20th century, unambiguously constituted the “big three.” The canonization of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim as comprising the widely recognized “trinity” of sociological theory is well established within various secondary texts (Hurst, 2000; Giddens, 1971; Hadden, 1997; Altschuler, 1998; Pampel, 2000; Gane, 1988), as ...

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