The Principal: Leadership for a Global Society

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Bruce M. Whitehead, Floyd Boschee & Robert H. Decker

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    Preface

    The power of this book is its readability and ability to focus on helping current and future school leaders meet continued demands of society, moral responsibilities, and changes in global education. It is unmatched in its approach to leading school leaders to success. Written for principals, teacher leaders, and individuals preparing for school leadership, this one-of-a-kind text constitutes the core functions of the principalship. To this extent, the authors explore the foundations and theory of leadership from a first-ever historical perspective, best practices, and solid research.

    An overarching theme of this unique text is to prepare prospective school leaders to meet the challenges of today's changing, globally connected classroom. This means taking the initiative and managing educational change at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels to improve teaching and learning. Moreover, becoming an effective building-level leader requires being totally committed to an important idea, having unwavering faith in the process, and understanding and promoting the value of positive change.

    A major emphasis of this book is on Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards. These current standards were developed in conjunction with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and are similar to the more commonly known Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards. Because of their importance, ELCC standards are noted throughout the text to help usher school leaders into the 21st century.

    Developing Leadership

    To be sure, it is crucial for 21st-century principals to first have the background and knowledge; second, to fully comprehend and understand leadership problems; and third, to apply solutions needed to improve education. It is through hard work, commitment, an inquiring mind, and the ability to learn from experiences, as noted in this text, that school principals will be able to go from a local to a global understanding. The challenge for future school leaders will be difficult, but the satisfaction is worth the effort. This book is designed to be an invitation for those seeking to become principals or teacher leaders to assume an active role in changing and improving our schools.

    Features of the Text

    Several special features make The Principal: Leadership for a Global Society more accessible to students and provide a plethora of ideas and strategies that address present and future leadership needs.

    Each chapter begins with Keys to Leadership and contains a section on practical applications. The Keys to Leadership feature provides a series of informative strategies that relate to special understandings needed by future curriculum leaders. Each leadership key gives a practical and insightful view into the world of what works in the area of the principalship.

    Scattered throughout each chapter are innovative Tips for Principals.

    An Applications section encourages the reader to stop at the end of each chapter to think carefully and reflect on the issues being presented. A series of applications is designed to help identify and analyze beliefs about the leadership process. Each application deals with an important or controversial concept that provides thought-provoking exercises pertinent to the subject under discussion. These reflect features that reinforce the content, examine contentious topics, and challenge readers to explore their own ideas and beliefs.

    Each chapter contains a reflective Case Study that includes a Challenge to the reader and Key Issues/Questions. The case studies give the reader an opportunity to spend additional time investigating controversial issues and topics that affect education today. Each issue or topic highlighted has been chosen because of its direct impact on schooling and its potential for impacting leadership. The challenge exercise provides a thought-provoking activity that stimulates discussion and promotes self-understanding. The key issues/questions section provides a series of meaningful and personalized questions that relate to ideas and content within the case study. These thought-provoking questions help the reader analyze and develop deeper insights into the issues and concepts being discussed.

    A Webliography and References are provided to encourage readers to explore links to websites where they can research issues and current administrative practices. These links may change over time, but they will initially help the reader gain an understanding and perspective about current leadership issues and questions posed.

    Organization of the Text

    For the purposes of this book, the authors focus on collaborative roles as a framework for a discussion of the principalship. Collaborative roles include the principal as visionary, planner, instructional leader, systemic leader, manager, supervisor, behavioral specialist, evaluator, community leader, cultural advisor, and public relations specialist.

    As noted in Chapter 1, sharing a global vision is a core component of the principalship. It remains vitally important for principals of action to implement and enforce a district's shared vision regardless of constraints found within the school community. By doing so, future principals will be supporting teachers at the heart of their journey—desiring to help all students to learn. As part of this chapter, research studies by the National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education (CALDER) provide evidence as to the importance of principal leadership. In addition, highly important survey information by the Wallace Foundation is included.

    Researching the history of school leadership is a major component for understanding the role of principals. As framed in Chapter 2, researching and reviewing past practices provides a deeper awareness of the extent to which changes are often influenced by larger social forces. It also offers a broader perspective from which to view so-called innovations and reforms, which often seem to reverberate with echoes of previous generations. Thus, the purpose of this chapter is to provide a closer focus on the major developments affecting American schools while still providing the broader perspective so essential to understanding the principalship.

    Chapter 3 reveals how theoretical constructs are an important element of the school's shared vision. Many principals often dismiss theory as completely unrelated to their day-to-day work, but the view advanced throughout this chapter is exactly the opposite—that sound theory and research are huge factors in school success.

    In addition to theoretical constructs, complex societal problems tend to dramatically affect a school district's shared vision and mission. Chapter 4 vividly relates how political issues can change the way principals run their buildings. Federal and state governments, professional organizations, local school boards, textbook publishers, accrediting organizations, parent and community groups, and teachers all have conflicting views as to what should be taught in the classroom. These habitual conflicting influences seem to change in their strength from time to time, and their particular impact upon the principalship can be counterintuitive.

    Chapter 5 pinpoints the importance of leadership planning at multiple levels: at the federal level, when policy decisions and their implementation are planned; at the state level, when state offices of education plan for major changes; at the district level, when the district plans to revise a field of study; at the school level, when the school revises its program of studies or adds a new course; and at the classroom level, when the teacher plans a unit of study. It is therefore instrumental for any principal, as the school's instructional leader, to be at the focal point of the planning process.

    First and foremost, instructional and leadership practices are discussed in Chapter 6. The principal as an instructional leader is one of the most important roles of the principalship. The central responsibility of leadership at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels is to improve teaching and learning—both are crucial to school success. Not enough can be said about the critical nature of the principal as the curriculum leader of his or her school.

    The role of a principal as a change agent is discussed in Chapter 7. This is particularly important in that the accountability requirements of federal regulations seem to have put the responsibility of student achievement squarely upon school building leaders. Thus, the principal, as a leader of instructional change, will continue to be a critical factor in the future. A major part of being a change agent is being a catalyst for technological change. Principals are leading the way in bringing their schools into the new age of technology with iPads and other mobile devices.

    Chapter 8 engages ideas on how a program of studies can reflect the total set of systemic organized learning experiences—at all levels. It is therefore useful for a principal, as a systemic leader, to implement an organized process to assess and to improve a program of studies. A building-level principal, in the know, is better able to focus on improving existing instruction rather than just creating new programs.

    The role of the principal as a manager is reviewed in Chapter 9. This involves the proper allocation of resources such as personnel and facilities essential to creating an effective learning environment. School leaders must use time management and organizational knowledge to create learning environments conducive to the academic success of all students. Through a process of leading and debriefing, principals learn how to share information. The key, therefore, is to formulate a management style that best utilizes resources at hand while at the same time remaining true to the district vision.

    Chapter 10 highlights supervision as it pertains to real leadership. As part of the supervisory process, it is helpful if principals know the best research practices as well as common problems and issues impacting teaching and learning. Individual school leaders who wish to improve curriculum and instructional skills need to reconceptualize the supervisory process—to see it more broadly and to differentiate its use.

    Evaluation is a key component of school leadership. As noted in Chapter 11, research seems to suggest there is a special need for principals to better understand the process of evaluation domains and how they relate to the development of effective schools. This chapter relates how great principals are able to capitalize on walkthroughs, collect and collate data with mobile devices, and review past practices effectively. Individual principals learn to analyze issues from a perspective of what went well and what didn't, what is fact and what is opinion, and, most importantly, what should possibly be done differently in the future.

    Sensitive topics as bullying and discipline in schools are covered in Chapter 12. Written by a principal for principals, this chapter shares how school leaders are learning to foster a sense of community through listening, mutual respect, and fairness. Building-level administrators can help make schools safe by establishing schoolwide discipline-related practices and enforcing school rules for behavior, as well as encouraging positive and respectful relationships through Olweus and other similar programs.

    How community partnerships continue to emerge is examined in Chapter 13. School principals need to formulate new coalitions and move away from individualism and toward partnerships. Through successful collaborations with diverse community agencies and groups, principals are better able to offer a continuum of comprehensive and preventive services. A quality public relations program helps expand the circle of effective leadership. Experienced principals list a plethora of reasons why a top-notch communications program should be based on leadership, farsighted school district goals, and well-planned strategies. This chapter, therefore, discusses the many and varied ways principals can formulate and implement effective public relations strategies in their own schools.

    Chapter 14 reviews practical applications of principals as they relate to being effective community and cultural leaders. As part of these practical applications, a top priority of any building-level administrator has to be the safety and security of children and staff. Integrity and ethics are also major components of quality leadership. It is understandably important for principals and teacher leaders to model ethical qualities as well as outstanding citizenship. School leaders acting with integrity, fairness, and ethics are important role models for teachers and students.

    Along with having high integrity as leaders, it is important for experienced principals to serve as mentors and role models for others. As noted in Chapter 15, the development of a quality mentorship program is an important aspect of school leadership. To be effective, the mentoring process must be continually adjusted to enable every principal to exhibit stronger ties to quality leadership. With a mentoring program in place, principals begin to see the real value of team building. It is also important for principals to be aware of student special education needs, autism spectrum disorders, gifted and talented programs, and current intervention programs.

    Chapter 16 highlights “principal alerts” as well as unique situations currently impacting the principalship. This chapter dramatically reveals leadership as an active process, not a passive one. Viewed as a dynamic process, principals at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels, learn to work collaboratively in a culturally diverse world to find solutions to difficult issues. This level of leadership requires background experience as well as an expression of special qualities.

    In retrospect and looking back at all of the previous chapters, it is abundantly clear that many of the collaborative roles of elementary and secondary principals represent the foundation of effective leadership. Moreover, it is abundantly clear that principals and teacher leaders are becoming instruments of educational change. To evoke this kind of change, future principals will need to reach out to everyone, including teachers, noncertified staff, parents, and community members. This is the most productive and best way to create an environment of positive cooperation and change on a global scale. As part of that change, the roles of the principals, applying research, and the setting of leadership standards will be major factors in any principal's success.

    Future Challenge

    As an educational resource, The Principal: Leadership for a Global Society is an exceptionally powerful textbook. It is especially unique in its redesign initiative and how it addresses the need for quality school leadership in the future. With an urgency to reform schools, the global challenge is for school leaders worldwide to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to effect positive and systemic change. With its design supported by extensive field experience, this definitive book provides the elements of moral and ethical leadership, features effective programs, and focuses on management, community, and instructional strategies as well as highlights pathways to professional development. Thus, it is quality resources such as this text that will enhance the transformation of school leadership globally—ensuring today's students can become tomorrow's leaders.

    Ancillary Material for the Instructor

    Appendix A provides an Evaluation Handbook for Professional Staff. The handbook was developed by the Sioux Falls School District in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Appendix B provides an Administrator Evaluation Handbook. The administrator handbook was developed by the Sioux Falls School District in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    A password-protected site, available at www.sagepub.com/whitehead, features resources that have been designed to help you plan and teach your course. These resources include an extensive test bank, chapter-specific PowerPoint presentations, sample syllabi for semester and quarter courses, and web resources.

    Acknowledgments

    No single writer or a group of three writers could prepare a comprehensive work on the principalship without relying heavily upon the ideas, prior publications, and constructive criticism of others. We appreciate the cooperation of those whose published writings, researches, and private documents are quoted in this volume. We are equally grateful to all those whose writings are cited as references.

    However, a general statement of gratitude is not sufficient recognition for the contributions of a number of colleagues who reviewed the original manuscript submitted and offered realistic criticisms for the book:

    Dr. Frank D. Adams —Wayne State College

    Barbara L. Brock —Creighton University

    Darlene Y. Bruner —University of South Florida

    Jose L. Chavez —California State University, Sacramento

    Dr. Effie N. Christie —Kean University

    Susan G. Clark —University of Akron

    Phillip F. Diller —Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania

    Sister Patricia Helene Earl, IHM —Marymount University

    Phyllis Gimbel —Bridgewater State College

    Dr. Gail Hartin —Southern Methodist University

    Robert E. Kladifko —California State University, Northridge

    Joseph Martin —Northern Arizona University

    Robert McCracken —Radford University

    Cheryl McFadden —East Carolina University

    Michelle Chaplin Partlow —Temple University

    Dr. Michael Pregot —Long Island University, Brooklyn

    Martin Scanlan —Marquette University

    Steven P. Shidemantle —Purdue University

    Dr. Velda M. Wright —Lewis University

    We extend a special thank-you to senior executive editor Diane McDaniel, editorial assistant Megan Koraly, production editor Brittany Bauhaus, and copyeditor Kim Husband from SAGE Publications for their continuing dialogue, assistance, and constant willingness to help with the production of The Principal: Leadership for a Global Society.

    We also acknowledge the continuing and supportive help of our wives, Charlotte S. Whitehead, an elementary school teacher; Marlys Ann Boschee, an elementary school teacher and university professor; and Paula J. Decker, an elementary school teacher. They helped us give meaning and coherence in an age in which change and flux in education reign supreme. Their experience in working with principals was invaluable.

    Although acknowledging the contributions and assistance of others, we reserve to ourselves whatever errors or shortcomings may have found their way into these pages. In this regard, it should be noted that the contributions of Dr. Whitehead, which were many, are expressions from current experience as a practicing principal.

    ELCC Standards

    Interface of ELCC/NCATE Standards and Book Chapters
    ELCC STANDARDS
    StandardElementBook content
    Standard 1.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.1.1 Develop a school vision of learning.Chapters 1, 5, 7, 8, 13, 16
    1.2 Articulate a school vision of learning.Chapters 1, 5, 7, 8, 13, 16
    1.3 Implement a school vision of learning.Chapters 1, 5, 7, 8, 13, 16
    1.4 Steward a school vision of learning.Chapters 1, 5, 7, 8, 13, 16
    1.5 Promote community involvement in school vision.Chapters 1, 5, 7, 8, 13, 16
    Standard 2.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.2.1 Promote a positive school culture.Chapters 1, 2, 3. 9, 11, 14, 15, 16
    2.2 Provide effective instructional program.Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16
    2.3 Apply best practice to student learning.Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16
    2.4 Design comprehensive professional growth plans.Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 13
    Standard 3.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.3.1 Manage the organization.Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13
    3.2 Manage the operations.Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13
    3.3 Manage the resources.Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16
    Standard 4.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.4.1 Collaborate with families and other community members.Chapters 1, 5, 8, 9, 13, 16
    4.2 Respond to community interests and needs.Chapters 1, 5, 8, 9, 13, 16
    4.3 Mobilize community resources.Chapters 1, 5, 8, 9, 13, 16
    Standard 5.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.5.1 Acts with integrity.Chapters 16, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
    5.2 Acts fairly.Chapters 16, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 3, 14, 15
    5.3 Acts ethically.Chapters 16, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
    Standard 6.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.6.1 Understand the larger educational context.Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    6.2 Respond to the large educational context.Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    6.3 Influence the larger educational context.Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
    Standard 7: Internship. The internship provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in Standards 1-6 through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real setting, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit. Chapters 1, 4, 5, 8, 13, 15.
  • Appendix A: Evaluation Handbook

    SOURCE: Sioux Falls School District.

    Purpose

    Evaluation of professional staff shall be a cooperative effort between the administrator and employee. An effective professional evaluation system is not only a means for evaluation but also a means to promote growth. It is our desire to encourage all professional persons to take an active role in the evaluation process.

    Sioux Falls School District Evaluation Handbook Review Committee 2012

    Sue Anderson, Counselor, Memorial Middle School

    Larry Bandy, Principal, John F. Kennedy Elementary

    Dr. JoJean Callison, Assistant Principal, Axtell Park Middle School

    Paul Gausman, Coordinator of Fine and Performing Arts, IPC

    Steve Griffith, Principal, Edison Middle School

    Dee Gulson, Principal, Oscar Howe Elementary

    Jackie Hanthorn, Teacher, Axtell Park Middle School

    Marcia Herr, Teacher, Patrick Henry Middle School

    Pam Holloway, Teacher, Axtell Park Middle School

    Dr. Pam Homan, Director Assessment, Information, and Technology

    Dianna Kemper, Principal, Mark Twain Elementary/Challenge Center

    Bonnie Mehlbrech, Teacher, Roosevelt High School

    Jamie Nold, Assistant Principal, Lincoln High School

    Cheryl O'Brien, Coordinator of High School Education, IPC

    Don Ryswyk, Assistant Principal, Roosevelt High School

    Karen Sandager, Nurse, Whittier Middle School

    Dr. Dave Scala, Assistant Superintendent

    Marlys Schmidt, Counselor, Roosevelt High School

    Sonja Sherburne, Teacher, Axtell Park Middle School

    Gail Swenson, President, SFEA

    Ann Tornberg, Teacher, Lincoln High School

    Cindy Washburn, Teacher, Robert Frost Elementary

    Sioux Falls School District Evaluation Handbook Review Committee 2008

    Julie Aasen, Teacher, Washington High School

    Dr. Fred Aderhold, Assistant Superintendent

    Larry Bandy, Principal, John F. Kennedy Elementary

    Lisa Brunick, Teacher, Hawthorne Elementary

    Val Fox, Principal, Lincoln High School

    Mike Moore, Assistant Principal, Whittier Middle School

    Todd Peichel, Teacher, Hayward Elementary School

    Ann Tornberg, President, SFEA

    Jill Vettrus, Teacher, Patrick Henry Middle School

    Critical Evaluation Dates
    • October 1—Evaluation purposes, policies, and procedures must be reviewed with professional staff.
    • October 1—Professional staff on a Professional Growth Plan cycle meet with evaluator to discuss the plan.
    • December 1—First formal evaluation must be completed for professional staff in the first 3 full years of employment in the district.
    • December 1—First formal evaluation must be completed for professional staff on a Plan of Assistance.
    • December 1—One formal evaluation or a minimum of two drop-in visits must be completed on all staff on comprehensive evaluations, including teachers in their second and third years of employment in the district.
    • January 15—Professional staff on a Professional Growth Plan cycle meet with evaluator to review progress of the plan.
    • April 1—Evaluations and conferences must be completed for those on Plans of Assistance and first-/second-/third-year professional staff.
    • April 15—Board action must be completed to terminate for just cause according to state law.
    • May 1—Comprehensive evaluations and Professional Growth Plans must be completed.
    Definitions
    • Annual evaluation—one classroom observation with pre- and postconferences, for professional staff in or beyond their fourth year of employment in the district, following a change in building, subject area, program, or two or more grade levels at elementary (e.g., K to 2, 1 to 3, 2 to 4, or 3 to 5).
    • Classroom observation—an observation of at least 30 minutes in length, with full knowledge of the staff member, resulting in a written report. Teachers, school library/media staff, speech and language therapists, psychologists, psychometrists, school social workers, school counselors, and school nurses will be observed in various work environments.
    • Classroom Observation Evaluation Form—a standardized form to be completed by evaluator and staff member after each classroom observation. One copy will be sent to the human resources office for professional staff in first through third year of employment in the district and professional staff in or beyond fourth year on annual evaluation (Appendix B).
    • Classroom Observation Worksheet—a standardized worksheet to be utilized by the evaluator during the formal classroom observation. The information from the worksheet should be summarized on the Classroom Observation Evaluation Form (Appendix A).
    • Comprehensive evaluation—a process of evaluating professional staff. Consists of two formal observations, five drop-in visits, and summary evaluation for first-year professional staff and one formal observation, five drop-in visits, and summary evaluation for all professional staff in or beyond their fourth year of employment with the district.
    • Drop-in visits—Drop-in visits in the comprehensive evaluation cycle must each be at least 10 minutes in duration with a minimum of two drop-in visits in one semester. Each drop-in visit used for evaluation will result in written feedback to the teacher within 5 days of the drop-in visit. A summary of the drop-in visits will be included in the summative report.
    • Evaluator—the building administrator, department chair, or supervisor who has been delegated the authority to act as a representative of the superintendent of schools.
    • Informal evaluation—an observation of classroom or nonclassroom duties resulting in a written report.
    • Performance areas—criteria and indicators—areas involving planning, implementation, evaluation, classroom management, and demonstrating professionalism.
    • Personnel file—a record of employment and evaluation that is kept on file at the IPC in the human resources department.
    • Plan of assistance—a written plan for those in or beyond their fourth year of employment with the district to improve identified areas of instructional deficiencies that have been identified through the evaluation process (Appendix D).
    • Postobservation conference—a review of the formal observation conducted between the evaluator and staff member in which the observation is critiqued and the summary/recommendations are discussed. The evaluation form must be signed at this time or within the 5-working-day observation timeline.
    • Preobservation conference—a preview of the formal observation between the evaluator and staff member to discuss the upcoming observation. A one-to-one meeting is required for professional staff in the first 3 years of employment and for those on a Plan of Assistance. The preobservation conference for staff in or beyond the fourth year may be oral, written, or a combination of both by mutual consent.
    • Professional growth plan—jointly agreed-upon goals or objectives designed to enhance performance of a target area followed by specific action to be taken and a means of determining the degree of accomplishment of those actions (Appendix E).
    • Professional staff—certified individuals regularly employed in a professional capacity by the district school board.
    • Summative Evaluation Form—a standardized form to be completed following one or two classroom observations and conferences and a summary of five drop-in visits on comprehensive evaluation (Appendix C).
    • Teacher-initiated data—information offered by the staff member to evaluator concerning personal contributions, honors received, degrees earned, and classes taken or participated in for the benefit of personal and professional growth. This information can be documented for the purpose of recognizing the staff member.
    • Three-year cycle—the evaluation cycle for professional staff in or beyond their fourth full year of employment with the district, including (1) professional growth plan, (2) comprehensive evaluation, and (3) no formal evaluation or professional growth plan.
    Steps in the Evaluation Process
    • Procedures—Formal Evaluations
      • A formal evaluation consists of a classroom observation, which shall:
        • be preceded by a preobservation conference;
        • be of at least thirty (30) minutes' duration;
        • occur on separate days—one each semester;
        • be done openly and with full knowledge of the teacher (the use of eavesdropping, closed-circuit television, public address or audio systems, and surveillance devices shall be strictly prohibited. The staff member may request the use of such devices for the purposes of self-study and improvement.);
        • result in a written report prepared in triplicate; and
      • The postobservation conference shall be held within the 5-working-day observation timeline.
      • The evaluation form will be signed by both parties, with a copy given to the teacher. The staff member's signature shall signify the staff member has read the report and has received a copy of it.
      • One (1) copy of the Summative Evaluation Form shall be filed in the professional staff member's personnel file in the human resources department, and one (1) copy of the Summative Evaluation Form shall be retained by the evaluator.
      • Evaluations shall be conducted by either the building administrator or supervisor most directly responsible for the professional staff member's work. In no case shall a supervisor with a part-time teaching assignment evaluate another teacher in buildings to which the supervisor is assigned as a teacher.
      • The criteria on which a professional staff member will be evaluated are planning for instruction, implementing instruction, evaluating instruction, classroom management, and demonstrating professionalism.
      • In the first year of employment in the district, up to one formal evaluation may be conducted by the department chair.
    • Procedures—Informal Evaluation
      • An informal evaluation shall:
        • consist of first-hand observation of classroom or other than classroom duties; and
        • result in a written report prepared in triplicate.
      • The written report of the observation shall be reviewed in a conference between the evaluator and the staff member within the 5-working-day observation timeline.
      • The written report of the observation will be signed by both parties, with a copy given to the staff member. The staff member's signature shall signify the staff member has read the report and has received a copy of it.
      • One (1) copy of the informal evaluation written report shall be filed in the staff member's personnel file in the human resource department, and (1) copy of the written report shall be retained by the evaluator.
      • The observation shall be made by the administrator or supervisor most directly responsible for the staff member's work and may also be made by the superintendent, assistant superintendent, or directors.
      • Informal evaluations shall not be limited in number.
    • Procedures—Drop-in Visits
      • Drop-in visits may occur at anytime for all staff.
      • For the purposes of formal evaluation, a collection of five (5) drop-in visits of at least 10 minutes in duration with a minimum of two drop-in visits in one semester will be part of the comprehensive evaluation cycle. Each drop-in visit used for this purpose will result in written feedback to the probationary teacher within 5 days of the drop-in visit. A summary of the drop-in visits will be included in the summative report.
    • Procedures—Evaluation of Itinerant Staff
      • Itinerant staff includes any professional staff member covered by the negotiated agreement with more than one building assignment.
      • The administrator from the itinerant staff member's home attendance center or district supervisor most directly responsible for the professional staff member's work shall track the cycle and coordinate the shared evaluations of that staff member.
    • Plans of Assistance
      • When a formal evaluation, informal evaluation, or drop-in visits reveal deficiencies that place a professional staff member's continued employment in question, a written Plan of Assistance will be provided by the evaluator and reviewed with the staff member, for all staff who are in or beyond the fourth consecutive year of employment in the district.
      • A minimum of two (2) formal classroom observations with pre- and postconferences shall take place. The first evaluation and conference shall be completed prior to Dec. 1. A minimum of five (5) drop-in visits of at least 10 minutes in duration with a minimum of two drop-in visits in one semester shall occur. Each drop-in visit will result in written feedback to the teacher on a Plan of Assistance within 5 days of the drop-in visit. A summary of the drop-in visits will be included in the summative report.
      • A summative evaluation shall be completed by April 1 with at least one (1) observation occurring in the second semester.
      • The Plan of Assistance shall include a statement of deficiency, the consequences of not correcting the deficiency, the program the staff member must follow, the assistance the supervisor must provide, the monitoring system, and the evaluation provision.
      • The evaluator shall provide positive, supportive assistance and resources reasonably available.
      • The evaluator or designee shall provide demonstrations of theories, techniques, and proper methods for the staff member if necessary and/or appropriate.
      • A reasonable time (minimum of one semester) shall be allowed for the staff member to correct the deficiencies.
    • General Procedures
      • In the event there is a disagreement between the staff member and the evaluator that may affect the staff member's employment status, arrangements shall be made for a different administrator to evaluate the staff member if the staff member or administrator so requests.
      • Each school year, not later than October 1, the administration shall call a conference for all professional staff members at either a building or district level for the purpose of reviewing the provisions of the law and this policy and procedures for evaluation and supervision.
      • All evaluations shall be conducted uniformly throughout the school system with respect to training provided evaluators, evaluation forms used, and performance standards.
    • Professional staff in first 3 full years of employment in the district
      • During year one, staff shall be formally evaluated at least two (2) times, with additional formal evaluations if requested by the staff member and provided the request is reasonable. The staff member will receive a minimum of five (5) drop-in visits, with at least two occurring during the first semester.
      • During years two and three, staff shall be formally evaluated at least one (1) time each year, with additional formal evaluations if requested by the staff member and provided the request is reasonable. The staff member will receive a minimum of five (5) drop-in visits, with at least two occurring during the first semester.
      • The first formal evaluation and conference shall be completed prior to December 1.
      • Formal, informal, and drop-in visits shall be completed by April 1. At least one evaluation and conference shall be completed in the second semester.
    • Professional staff in or beyond fourth full year of employment in the district
      • Shall be on a 3-year cycle to include the following (flexible order):
        • Professional growth plan (individual or collaborative)
        • Comprehensive evaluation
        • No formal evaluation or professional growth plan.
      • Each formal evaluation of a professional staff member in this category on the comprehensive year of the e-year cycle shall have pre- and postconferences.
      • The comprehensive evaluation shall be completed by May 1.
      • The professional growth plan process shall not be used to justify nonrenewal. Professional growth plans shall be started no later than October 1 and shall be completed by May 1.
    • Professional staff in or beyond fourth full year of employment in the district with a change of assignment
      • Should a staff member change buildings, subject areas, programs, or two or more grade levels (e.g., K to 2, 1 to 3, 2 to 4, or 3 to 5), an annual evaluation shall be completed and the 3-year cycle shall begin anew the next year.
      • This would not apply to itinerant staff whose other building assignments may change, but home attendance center, subject area, program and grade levels, or district evaluator remains the same.
    Evaluation Cycle

    Evaluation Forms

    Responsibilities of Evaluator and Staff Member
    • EVALUATOR SHALL:
      • Meet with professional staff not later than October 1 to review the purposes, policies, and procedures of evaluation.
      • Must be trained with respect to evaluation procedures, evaluation forms, and indicators of effectiveness that are to be used.
      • Provide positive, supportive assistance and resources that are available.
      • Provide for the demonstration of theories, techniques, and methodology for the staff member if necessary and/or appropriate.
      • Conduct a preobservation conference, an observation, and a postobservation conference.
      • Furnish the professional staff member a written observation report no later than 5 working days after the observation.
      • Conduct the observation openly and with the full knowledge of the staff member.
    • PROFESSIONAL STAFF SHALL:
      • Meet with the evaluator prior to October 1 to review the purposes, policies, and procedures of evaluation.
      • Be familiar with the evaluation handbook and indicators of effectiveness on which the evaluation shall be based.
      • Provide the evaluator a lesson guide during the preobservation conference that will list the lesson objectives, teaching steps, and evaluation of the lesson.
      • Complete the requirements of the evaluation cycle.
      • Provide professional staff–initiated data that will be used in either the annual or summative evaluation if staff member so desires.
      • Implement the improvement suggestions after the postobservation conference.
    Indicators of Effective Teaching
    Section 1—Planning for Instruction
    • Plans instructional tasks that are meaningful and related to learning goals
      • plans for learning needs and abilities of each student
      • prepares plans that correlate with specific instructional objectives
      • plans instructional activities that communicate high level of expectation
      • selects instructional methods (models) and learning activities that are compatible with content, learning styles, and student abilities
      • constructs a variety of learning activities
      • develops extended and enriched activities to challenge students beyond the required curriculum
      • plans evaluation procedures consistent with instructional objectives
    Section 2—Implementing Instruction
    • Implements district curriculum
      • uses approved district curriculum
      • uses resource and supplemental materials that relate to the curriculum
    • Maintains a strong instructional focus utilizing the elements of effective instruction
      • introduces the lesson
      • states the lesson objective/goal
      • teaches the content
      • uses variation in voice, movement, and pacing to focus attention during lesson
      • models/demonstrates
      • checks for understanding
      • includes guided and/or independent practice
      • summarizes lesson
    • Communicates a high level of expectation
    • Communicates clear learning goals to students
    • Adapts instruction to meet the needs of all students
    • Addresses various learning styles
    • Sequences content at an appropriate pace
    • Uses appropriate level of questioning to promote understanding
      • solicits student participation
      • extends students' responses/contributions or probes for deeper understanding
      • provides ample time for students to respond to teacher questions and to consider content
    • Relates lesson content to prior and future learning
    • Requires students to summarize information in written and/or verbal form
    • Appropriately recognizes and reinforces individual student effort
    • Represents knowledge/information nonlinguistically through a variety of methods
      • Could include use of methods such as graphic organizers, physical models, mental pictures, drawings and pictographs, or kinesthetic activities
    • Organizes students in cooperative or ability groups when appropriate
    • Requires students to analyze and apply knowledge
    • Displays enjoyment, humor, and enthusiasm for teaching and expects students to enjoy learning
    Section 3—Evaluating Instruction
    • Conducts ongoing assessments for learning
      • provides specific and immediate feedback related to student learning
      • monitors students' performance as they engage in learning activities
      • solicits responses or demonstrations from specific students for assessment purposes
      • monitors and communicates student progress at regular intervals
    • Provides reteaching and/or interventions when appropriate
    Section 4—Classroom Management
    • Has established appropriate classroom rules and procedures that are clearly understood by all students
    • Effectively and consistently enforces rules and follows procedures
    • Redirects students naturally and immediately without disrupting others
    • Is well organized and has all materials, equipment, and so forth ready for immediate use
    • Carries out smooth and effective transitions (e.g., from one activity to another, as students enter and leave the room)
    • Maximizes time on purposeful instructional tasks
    • Begins and ends class period with focus on learning
    • Has established a positive learning environment
      • respects and shows sensitivity to individual needs and concerns
      • provides opportunities for the student to assume responsibility and develop independence
      • avoids sarcasm and negative criticism
      • establishes and maintains positive rapport with students
      • establishes a trusting environment that fosters risk taking
      • treats students in a professional teacher–student manner
      • recognizes individual and cultural diversity of students
    Section 5—Demonstrates Professionalism
    • Participates in ongoing professional growth
      • stays current in content and instructional strategies
      • incorporates technology
      • seeks and/or participates in opportunities such as innovative and experimental programs, summer research, and local, state, and federal grants
    • Participates in school/professional and/or community organizations or events
    • Completes routine assigned tasks and complies with district requirements
      • completes required paperwork
      • monitors budget if required by position
      • meets established timelines
      • follows district and building policies and procedures
      • demonstrates support of district goals
    • Promotes the education profession
      • serves on building or district committees
      • volunteers for extra duty assignments
      • serves as a teacher, trainer, presenter, or mentor to others
      • serves as a positive role model in the school environment
    • Communicates effectively and professionally with colleagues, parents, and students
      • initiates communication with parents about student performance and/or behavior when appropriate
      • conducts parent–teacher conferences in accordance with district policy
      • reports student progress to parents and students
      • maintains confidentiality unless disclosure is required by law
      • develops and maintains supportive, flexible, and cooperative relationships with colleagues, parents, and students
    Indicators of Effective School Library/Media Staff

    The coordination of the library/media program requires leadership abilities and managerial skills.

    The leadership abilities and commitment of the building librarian are crucial factors in developing credibility for the library media program as an integral part of the teaching and learning in the school. Effective leadership articulates the vision of the school library media program. Effective management transforms the mission of the program into goals, objectives, and operating policies. The success of the library media program depends upon a joint partnership of the building librarian, staff, administration, and district library media services personnel.

    To carry out the mission of the library media program, the librarian performs four separate but overlapping roles to link the information resources and services of the library/media program to the information needs and interests of the school's students and staff as information specialist, teacher, instructional consultant, and manager. Through these roles, the librarian provides access to information, formal and informal instruction, and recommendations for instructional planning to teachers.

    • Information Specialist
      • Librarians make resources available to students and teachers through a systematically developed collection within the school and through access to resources outside the school
      • Access to the library collection and information resources is provided by an accurate and efficient retrieval system utilizing appropriate technology
      • Students and staff receive assistance in identifying, locating, and interpreting information housed in and outside the library media center
      • Teachers, students, parents, and administrators are informed of new materials, equipment, and services that meet their information needs
    • Teacher
    Section 1—Planning for Instruction
    • Plans instructional tasks that are meaningful and related to learning goals
      • plans for learning needs and abilities of each student
      • prepares plans that correlate with specific instructional objectives
      • plans instructional activities that communicate high level of expectation
      • selects instructional methods (models) and learning activities that are compatible with content, learning styles, and student abilities
      • constructs a variety of learning activities
      • develops extended and enriched activities to challenge students beyond the required curriculum
      • plans evaluation procedures consistent with instructional objectives
    Section 2—Implementing Instruction
    • Implements district curriculum
      • uses approved district curriculum
      • uses resource and supplemental materials that relate to the curriculum
    • Maintains a strong instructional focus utilizing the elements of effective instruction
      • introduces the lesson
      • states the lesson objective/goal
      • teaches the content
      • uses variation in voice, movement, and pacing to focus attention during lesson
      • models/demonstrates
      • checks for understanding
      • includes guided and/or independent practice
      • summarizes lesson
    • Communicates a high level of expectation
    • Communicates clear learning goals to students
    • Adapts instruction to meet the needs of all students
    • Addresses various learning styles
    • Sequences content at an appropriate pace
    • Uses appropriate level of questioning to promote understanding
      • solicits student participation
      • extends students' responses/contributions or probes for deeper understanding
      • provides ample time for students to respond to teacher questions and to consider content
    • Relates lesson content to prior and future learning
    • Requires students to summarize information in written and/or verbal form
    • Appropriately recognizes and reinforces individual student effort
    • Represents knowledge/information nonlinguistically through a variety of methods
      • Could include use of methods such as graphic organizers, physical models, mental pictures, drawings and pictographs, or kinesthetic activities
    • Organizes students in cooperative or ability groups when appropriate
    • Requires students to analyze and apply knowledge
    • Displays enjoyment, humor, and enthusiasm for teaching and expects students to enjoy learning
    Section 3—Evaluating Instruction
    • Conducts ongoing assessments for learning
      • provides specific and immediate feedback related to student learning
      • monitors students' performance as they engage in learning activities
      • solicits responses or demonstrations from specific students for assessment purposes
      • monitors and communicates student progress at regular intervals
    • Provides reteaching and/or interventions when appropriate
    Section 4—Classroom Management
    • Has established appropriate classroom rules and procedures that are clearly understood by all students
    • Effectively and consistently enforces rules and follows procedures
    • Redirects students naturally and immediately without disrupting others
    • Is well organized and has all materials, equipment, and so forth ready for immediate use
    • Carries out smooth and effective transitions (e.g., from one activity to another, as students enter and leave the room)
    • Maximizes time on purposeful instructional tasks
    • Begins and ends class period with focus on learning
    • Has established a positive learning environment
      • respects and shows sensitivity to individual needs and concerns
      • provides opportunities for the student to assume responsibility and develop independence
      • avoids sarcasm and negative criticism
      • establishes and maintains positive rapport with students
      • establishes a trusting environment that fosters risk taking
      • treats students in a professional teacher–student manner
      • recognizes individual and cultural diversity of students
    • Instructional Consultant
      • Librarians participate in building, district, department, and grade-level curriculum development and assessment projects on a regular basis
      • Librarians offer teachers assistance in using information resources, acquiring and assessing instructional materials, and incorporating information literacy into the classroom curriculum
      • Librarians use effective teaching strategies in working with teachers to improve instructional activities
      • Librarians provide leadership in the assessment, evaluation, and implementation of information and instructional technologies
    • Library/Media Program Manager
      • The mission, goals and objectives of the library/media program are clearly understood and supported by the administration, faculty, and students of the building
      • The librarian exhibits energy, enthusiasm, and interpersonal skills in day-to-day interactions with all users of the library to create a positive image of the program
      • The librarian develops and implements policies and procedures necessary for the effective operation of the library media program
      • The librarian evaluates the library media program regularly to review goals and objectives in relation to user and instructional needs and to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of specific activities
      • The librarian plans expenditures to fully utilize allocated budget funds
      • The library media program is promoted by the library staff to demonstrate the importance of the program, publicizing available services and resources to students and staff
      • The librarian assists in selection, training, and evaluation of the library media staff and volunteers as per building and district policies
    • Demonstrating Professionalism
      • Participates in ongoing professional growth
        • stays current in content and instructional strategies
        • incorporates technology
        • seeks and/or participates in opportunities such as innovative and experimental programs, summer research, and local, state, and federal grants
      • Participates in school/professional and/or community organizations or events
      • Completes routine assigned tasks and complies with district requirements
        • completes required paperwork
        • monitors budget if required by position
        • meets established timelines
        • follows district and building policies and procedures
        • demonstrates support of district goals
      • Promotes the library profession
        • serves on building or district committees
        • volunteers for extra duty assignments
        • serves as a teacher, trainer, presenter, or mentor to others
        • serves as a positive role model in the school environment
      • Communicates effectively and professionally with colleagues, parents, and students
        • initiates communication with parents about student performance and/or behavior when appropriate
        • maintains confidentiality unless disclosure is required by law
        • develops and maintains supportive, flexible, and cooperative relationships with colleagues, parents, and students
    Indicators of Effective Speech and Language Therapy Staff
    • Planning for Speech and Language Therapy
      • Plans, evaluates, selects, and modifies resources and activities consistent with instructional activities
        • plans for learning needs and abilities of each student
        • prepares plans which correlate with specific instructional objectives
        • plans instructional activities that communicate high level of expectation
        • selects therapy methods and activities that are compatible with content, learning styles, and student abilities
        • plans for cognitive levels of learning
        • constructs a variety of learning activities
        • develops extended and enriched activities to challenge students to communicate at a level commensurate with their language age
        • plans evaluation procedures consistent with instructional goals and objectives
      • Plans and demonstrates effective organizational and management skills
        • plans for the entire therapy session
        • establishes an organizational system to complete routine tasks
          • attendance
          • instruction for substitute therapist
          • lesson plans
          • daily documentation of progress
        • arranges appropriate physical environment
    • Implementing Instruction:
      • Follows the district's comprehensive plan for special education
        • designs and implements an approved individual educational program based on individual student needs
        • uses materials that relate to the remediation of a specified communication disorder
      • Includes elements of an effective therapy session
        • uses an appropriate therapy model
        • introduces the lesson
        • states the lesson goals and objectives
        • teaches the content
        • models/demonstrates
        • checks for comprehension
        • includes guided and/or independent practice
        • summarizes and reviews presented material and concepts
      • Uses strategies and techniques appropriate to the lesson goals and objectives
        • assesses student needs
        • considers learning styles, learning stages, learning needs
        • sequences content
        • uses investigatory questioning to promote comprehension
        • uses questions to promote higher-level thinking skills
        • uses appropriate responses to reinforce positive behavior
        • provides specific and immediate feedback related to student learning
      • Organizes the student environment—facilitates the learning environment to encourage the development of positive communication skills
        • conveys clear behavioral and language classroom expectations to students and monitors the compliance
        • uses variations in voice, movement, and positioning to focus attention during sessions
        • manages more than one disorder at a time when necessary
        • uses techniques and strategies to establish and maintain student motivation
        • establishes a trusting communication environment that fosters positive skills in the area of communication
      • Develops student self-concept—enhances positive student self-concept and attitude toward learning
        • instructs, models, or counsels in ways to cope effectively with problem communication situations
        • identifies and capitalizes on student interest and experiences and relates this to the remediation of communication disorders
        • respects and shows sensitivity to individual needs and concerns
        • provides opportunities for the student to assume responsibility for the development and continuation of good communication skills
        • focuses on the development of the student rather than personality
        • communicates praise commensurate with the needs of the individual students
        • encourages and recognizes diversity in the overall communication process
    • Evaluating Instruction
      • Assesses/monitors individual student progress
        • uses techniques to check comprehension and progress of all students at regular intervals
        • asks questions that are understood by students
        • provides criteria that allow students to measure progress
        • provides consistent flow of feedback on student performance
      • Strives to meet the needs of students
        • uses test score analysis
        • adapts instruction to meet the needs of communicatively disabled students
    • Demonstrating Professionalism
      • Participates in ongoing professional growth
        • stays current in content and therapeutic strategies
        • seeks and/or participates in opportunities such as innovative and experimental programs, summer research, and local, state, and federal grants
      • Participates in school/professional and/or community organizations or events
      • Completes routine assigned tasks and complies with district requirements
        • completes required paperwork
        • monitors budget if required by position
        • meets established timelines
        • follows district and building policies and procedures
        • demonstrates support of district goals
      • Promotes the speech and language profession
        • serves on building or district committees
        • volunteers for extra duty assignments
        • serves as a teacher, trainer, presenter, or mentor to others
        • serves as a positive role model in the school environment
      • Communicates effectively and professionally with colleagues, parents, and students
        • initiates communication with parents and students about student progress, performance, and/or behavior when appropriate
        • maintains confidentiality unless disclosure is required by law
        • develops and maintains supportive, flexible, and cooperative relationships with colleagues, parents, and students
      • Portrays positive self-concept and attitudes toward the vocation
        • treats students in a professional therapist–student manner
        • displays enjoyment, humor, and enthusiasm
        • recognizes individual and cultural diversity of students
    Indicators of Effective School Psychologists/Psychometrists
    • Planning for Session for School Psychologist/Psychometrists
      • Selects appropriate assessments
        • selects valid assessments consistent with tasks (tasks typically include consulting, interviewing, observing, and administering psychological tests)
        • selects valid and reliable assessments that are compatible and correlate to assessment objectives
        • uses assessments in accordance with district guidelines
      • Demonstrates effective organization to complete tasks
        • selects proper physical environment for the tasks
        • establishes an organizational system to complete routine tasks
        • selects appropriate materials
        • records appropriate information
        • provides written reports to staffing teams
          • meets timelines for submitting reports
          • covers content required for eligibility and instructional planning
          • leaves service and placement recommendations to be determined by placement committees
    • Implementing/Participation in Session
      • Adheres to appropriate professional guidelines
        • uses tests that are valid and reliable
        • uses guidelines similar to those of the National Association of School Psychologists
        • follows district guidelines for special education
      • Includes elements of an effective session
        • gains rapport
        • states the reason for the session objectively to the student, staff, or parent
        • uses good techniques of testing, interviewing, consulting, or observing
      • Uses techniques appropriate to the session tasks
        • assesses student needs
        • uses appropriate responses to promote maximum results
        • administers tests appropriately to promote valid results
        • follows the exact directions in the testing manual
      • Facilitates through proper rapport to encourage valid results
        • conveys a clear message of acceptance and caring to the student, staff, or parents
        • uses techniques that establish good communication
        • establishes a trusting relationship with the student, staff, or parents
        • uses techniques to establish and maintain student motivation
      • Enhances session positively and constructively by use of interpersonal relating skills
        • models and counsels in ways to cope effectively with problem situations
        • respects and shows sensitivity to individual needs and concerns
        • focuses on student behavior and results rather than personality
        • communicates praise commensurate with the needs of students and teachers
        • encourages and recognizes diverse opinions
    • Evaluating Methodology
      • Uses techniques that effect credibility of the evaluation
        • uses techniques to check understanding and progress of student at regular intervals
        • asks questions that are understood by the student
        • scores results of tests with extreme accuracy
      • Determines the needs of students through assessment
        • selects assessments for special-needs students
        • reviews assessment history
    • Demonstrating Professionalism
      • Participates in ongoing professional growth
        • stays current in professional methods
        • seeks and/or participates in opportunities such as innovative and experimental programs, summer research, and local, state, and federal grants
        • participates in professional and/or community organizations
      • Participates in school/professional and/or community organizations or events
      • Completes routine assigned tasks and complies with district requirements
        • completes required paperwork
        • monitors budget if required by position
        • meets established timelines
        • follows district and building policies and procedures
        • demonstrates support of district goals
      • Promotes the profession
        • serves on building or district committees
        • volunteers for extra duty assignments
        • serves as a teacher, trainer, presenter, or mentor to others
        • serves as a positive role model in the school environment
      • Communicates effectively and professionally with colleagues, parents, and students
        • initiates communication with parents about student performance and/or behavior when appropriate
        • reports information accurately
        • develops proper and informative reports
        • indicates student strengths and weaknesses as determined by assessment
        • maintains confidentiality unless disclosure is required by law
        • develops and maintains supportive, flexible, and cooperative relationships with colleagues, parents, and students
      • Portrays positive self-concept and attitudes toward the vocation
        • treats students with a professional manner and treats them with dignity and respect
        • displays enjoyment, humor, and enthusiasm
        • Recognizes individual and cultural diversity of students
    Indicators of Effective School Social Workers

    A key to a comprehensive school social worker program is a credible system for social worker evaluation. In drawing conclusions about social worker performance, evaluators are asked to rely on the standards of practice expected of social workers in the Sioux Falls School District. These indications of effective school social work function as a basis for social worker evaluation and also serve as a guide for self-evaluations.

    Standard 1: Plan and Deliver the School Social Work Program
    • Carries out goals of the school social work program
      • participates in planning annual social work goals
      • cooperates as a member of a team that advocates a developmental approach to meeting the personal, academic, and career planning needs of all students
      • achieves identified annual social work goals
    • Utilizes activities and processes appropriate to the needs of students
      • selects and develops resources that meet the needs of students and their families
      • adapts resources and strategies that are relevant to the needs of students
    • Manages time efficiently and effectively in performing social work functions
      • maximizes use of time available for social work services
      • maintains a daily social work log of contacts with students
      • meets regularly with school support staff
    Standard 2: Provide Appropriate Services to Staff, Parents, and Community
    • Establishes effective professional relationships and consults with staff
      • serves as a resource person to identify school and community resources to assist students/families
      • conducts effective student–family–school staff conferences
      • facilitates smooth student transition from one level to the next (K through postsecondary)
      • presents in-services or workshops or in other ways promotes positive family, school, and community relationships
    • Shares student information with staff, within the limits of confidentiality
      • when deemed to be in the best interest of students, social worker promptly communicates appropriate student information to selected staff
      • uses discretion in handling confidential information
      • maintains the confidence of staff and students
    • Serves as an effective liaison between the school district and community agencies
      • demonstrates knowledge of the roles/responsibilities of community agencies
      • establishes and maintains ongoing liaison relationships with various individuals and agencies that play a significant role in student development
      • establishes and maintains ongoing liaison relationship with personnel in other educational institutions
    • Consults with parents/guardians regarding the educational, career, and personal/social development of students
      • demonstrates knowledge of, interest in, and understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and circumstances of the parent
      • exhibits sensitivity, empathy, acceptance, and understanding necessary for establishing rapport with parents
      • encourages parents to practice effective parenting skills
      • communicates effectively with parents regarding students' progress and areas of difficulty and success
      • conducts effective parent conferences
      • presents workshops for parents when appropriate
      • assists with forming realistic perceptions of the student's abilities, interests, and attitudes as related to the educational, career, and personal/social development of students
      • conducts home visits
    • Interprets the school social work program to staff, parents, and community
      • seeks opportunities to inform the community about school social work services
      • uses a variety of strategies to communicate to staff, parents, and community
      • explains the philosophy and practices of school social work services
    Standard 3: Use Applicable Social Work Skills
    • Utilizes varied social work techniques to enhance student learning
      • refers students/families to school, district, and community agency programs
      • assists teachers with recognizing and providing for individual student differences
      • communicates with parents and teachers regarding student performance
    • Employs effective individual counseling strategies to facilitate attitude and behavior changes
      • using some theoretical base, provides effective personal counseling to students
      • encourages students to assume responsibility for own behaviors, choices, and relationships
      • exhibits sensitivity, empathy, and acceptance necessary for establishing rapport • holds positive regard for the worth, dignity, and uniqueness of each individual
      • uses both verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors appropriately
      • responds to verbal and nonverbal communications in meaningful ways
      • uses open-ended questions and prompts
      • reflects feelings of communicator
      • accurately paraphrases content of communicator's message
      • uses interpretation skills effectively
      • is able to think of multiple options for problem solution
      • is able to envision and relate possible consequences of various options
      • can articulate own theoretical framework with respect to social work
      • irrespective of counseling technique utilized, the social worker demonstrates warmth, congruency, openness, empathy, unconditional positive regard, and genuineness
    • Conducts appropriate group activities
      • demonstrates knowledge of group dynamics
      • forms and facilitates groups as necessary
      • facilitates groups for students using some theoretical model
      • keeps group on task
      • sensitively encourages participation of each group member
      • facilitates communication between participants
      • interrupts destructive interaction
    • Establishes effective rapport with students, parents, and staff
      • communicates effectively with and about students
      • acts as student advocate appropriately and effectively
      • exhibits sensitivity, empathy, warmth, and acceptance necessary for establishing rapport
      • is aware of students' backgrounds
      • respects students and is considerate of their needs
      • maintains a positive attitude and is supportive and promotes students' self-worth
      • promptly acknowledges request to see a social worker
      • indicates conditions under which confidentiality is provided with respect to privileged communication
    Standard 4: Perform in a Professional Manner
    • Accepts and uses constructive criticism to enhance self-development and job performance
      • is open to constructive criticism
      • sets goals and monitors performance standards that are in need of improvement
      • enrolls in staff development sessions that relate to self-development and job performance improvement
      • seeks out information and feedback relative to job performance
    • Speaks and writes clearly, effectively, and appropriately
      • practices standard English usage in speaking and writing
      • uses appropriate vocabulary
      • uses correct spelling
      • oral and written communication is well organized, to the point, and facilitates understanding
    • Improves performance by keeping informed of current theories, practices, issues, and trends related to education and school social work
      • applies research knowledge and seeks new ways to enhance performance
      • attempts sound innovative and creative approaches to problems
      • develops and implements a personal, professional growth plan
      • attends classes/seminars/workshops appropriate to needs and interests
      • seeks out both formal and informal experiences designed to enhance knowledge and skills of profession
    • Is actively involved in social work professional growth activities and organizations
      • reads and shares professional journals, newsletters, and articles
      • holds professional membership and supports the work of local chapters
      • accepts leadership roles in professional associations
      • participates actively in in-district in-service offerings
      • Volunteers to serve on committees or accepts other leadership opportunities as offered.
    • Is resourceful in responding to situations
      • adapts social work techniques and methods to individual students
      • is knowledgeable about the range of personal, educational, and career resources available in the school and community to assist students and parents
      • collaborates with others throughout the school and community when deemed appropriate
      • gathers as much information as needed to consult effectively and efficiently
      • establishes credibility by being able to suggest a variety of options, alternatives, resources, or strategies
    • Uses own initiative to accomplish tasks; is self-motivated
      • exceeds expectations that are explicitly defined
      • initiates school social work program changes as necessary
      • seeks creative solutions to identified problems within the school
      • ensures that communication flows freely when working with students, parents, and teachers
      • determines needs and priorities as perceived by students parents, staff, and administration
      • works well with minimum supervision
    • Maintains confidentiality
      • makes a commitment of primary responsibility to students while providing adequate communication to teachers, parents, administrators, and other referral sources without violating confidentiality of the relationship
      • refrains from revealing confidential information inappropriately
      • indicates conditions under which confidentiality is provided with respect to privileged communication
    • Maintains high professional ethics
      • observes ethical standards of the National Association of Social Workers
      • adheres to district policies and legal guidelines
      • does not impose personal value judgments on others
      • demonstrates impartiality with respect to gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or ability of students
      • is aware of own personal/emotional and professional limitations
      • uses student records in a professional manner
    • Promotes positive public relations
      • assists with helping the parents as well as the students and staff understand the school social work program and its variety of activities
      • explains the priorities and practices of the school social work program effectively
      • strives to be available to meet the public at open houses, parent/teacher conferences, and other functions
    • Contributes ideas to improve the climate and operation of the school
      • actively participates in committee meetings
      • cooperates with the school administration in addressing school goals and concerns
      • makes recommendations to the administration relative to improving the climate and operation of the school
    Indicators of Effective School Nurses
    Section 1: Clinical Knowledge—Utilizes a Distinct Clinical Knowledge Base for Decision Making in Nursing Practice
    • Applies appropriate theories from nursing and the physical, behavioral, public health, or social sciences to meet:
      • the unique and diverse needs of the students, staff, and parents in the school community
      • the objectives of the school health program
      • the mission of the education system
    • Possesses current knowledge in all areas that affect the holistic well-being of the members of the educational community
    Section 2: Nursing Process—Uses a Systemic Approach to Problem Solving in Nursing Practice
    • Assessment: Using appropriate techniques, collects and documents information regarding students, families, staff members, health care providers, organizations, and/or the community in a systematic, continuous manner
    • Diagnosis: Analyzes assessment data to allow for arrival at conclusions that can be validated, are documented, and facilitate the development of a plan of care and acceptable outcomes
    • Identify outcomes: Specifies measurable, appropriate, attainable, and timely goals, derived from the diagnosis, that have been mutually formulated with client and/or client's family and that are documented and provide for continuity of care
    • Plan: Develops a plan of care in which the use of nursing interventions, designed to attain mutually formulated outcomes unique to the client, is documented
    • Implement: Executes and adequately documents the interventions noted in a plan of care in a safe, appropriate manner
    • Evaluate: Systematically and continuously appraises client responses to prescribed interventions and the efficacy of interventions in relation to developed outcomes. Documents and uses evaluation data to revise plan of care as appropriate
    Section 3: Clients with Special Health Needs—Contributes to the Education of the Client with Special Health Needs by Assessing the Client, Planning and Providing Appropriate Nursing Care, and Evaluating the Identified Outcomes of Care
    • Possesses contemporary knowledge of areas related to the delivery of nursing care to students with special health needs, including but not limited to:
      • common and disabling conditions of childhood
      • national and state laws and judicial decisions applicable to special education and the rights of students and parents
      • school district policy and procedures related to students with special needs
      • existence and nature of local resources designed to meet the health educational needs of the child with special needs
      • the role of the school nurse in special education
      • the role of the school nurse with respect to students with special health needs
      • the roles of other members of the team assessing the student
      • the effect of chronic illness or disability on student and family
    • Conducts holistic nursing assessments of students with special health needs, to include:
      • a health and physical assessment
      • a health and developmental history
      • observation of the child at school or at home as appropriate
      • elicitation of supporting medical data as available
    • Participates in and presents findings, nursing diagnoses, and recommendations at team meetings
    • Participates in the development of the educational plan appropriate to child's needs
    • Develops and implements nursing plan of care
    • Monitors ongoing health status of students with special health needs and uses information gathered to work with team to adjust students' educational program as needed
    • Acts as a facilitator and advocate for the child/student with special health needs
    • Acts as an advocate for the family of the child with special health needs as necessary and appropriate
    • Provides education and information essential for facilitating normalization of the student's educational experiences to parents, teachers, and other staff
    • Provides information to parents of students with special health needs regarding school policy and procedures related to their child and the child's condition
    • Performs skilled nursing procedures as necessary in a safe, competent, and efficient manner
    • Supervises others in the performance of skilled nursing procedures where permitted by state and local law and state Nurse Practice Act
    Section 4: Communication—Uses Effective Written, Verbal, and Nonverbal Communication Skills
    • Uses communication as a positive strategy to achieve nursing goals
    • Employs effective expressive and receptive verbal skills, demonstrating articulate speech and good listening ability
    • Employs clear, cogent, and concise written communication
    • Employs an effective system of data storage, retrieval, and analysis
    • Demonstrates sensitiveness to values of students, families, and staff
    • Demonstrates understanding and clarification of professional and personal values and the impact of such on own professional communication
    • Employs counseling techniques and crisis intervention strategies in interventions with individuals and groups as appropriate
    • Identifies and uses own interpersonal strengths
    Section 5: Program Management—Establishes and Maintains a Comprehensive School Health Program
    • Participates in the coordination and management of nursing, health, or health education programs and their personnel as appropriate
    • Participates in evaluation of the efficacy of ongoing health programs and communicates findings to administrators and/or nursing supervisor as appropriate
    • Develops and implements health policies and procedures in collaboration with school administration and/or nursing supervisor as appropriate
    • Participates in budgeting for nursing and health services as necessary
    • Identifies current and potential health problems for individuals and the school as a community and the need for new health programs using systematic needs-assessment techniques
    • Demonstrates knowledge of sources of funding for existing or potential school health programs
    • Demonstrates knowledge of district policy and local, state, and federal laws related to existing and potential school health programs
    • Participates in the development and implementation of needed health programs using a program planning process
    • Identifies alternative or supplemental funding sources for health or health-related programs as necessary
    • Orients, supervises, and evaluates health assistants, aides, and others involved in health services delivery as appropriate
    • Develops and/or participates in committees as appropriate
    Section 6: Collaboration within the School System—Collaborates with other School Professionals, Parents, and Caregivers to Meet the Health, Developmental, and Educational Needs of Clients
    • Demonstrates knowledge of the philosophy and/or mission of the school district, the kind and purpose of its curricular and extracurricular activities, and its programs and special services
    • Demonstrates knowledge of the roles of other school professionals
    • Delineates roles and responsibilities of other school professionals and adjunct personnel
    • Demonstrates the ability to dialogue appropriately and as necessary regarding ongoing care for students/clients
    • Collaborates with parents or caregivers regarding self-care issues of students/clients
    • Collaborates with other school personnel to meet student health, developmental, and educational needs in a facilitator role
    • Recognizes and utilizes as appropriate and necessary the expertise of other school professionals to meet the needs of students
    • Functions as an advocate for student and family in interdisciplinary collaboration
    • Makes home visits as necessary to collect data, plan, implement, and/or evaluate client care
    • Functions as school–home liaison in student/family health concerns
    • Advises administrators of collaborative plans of care for students as necessary
    Section 7: Collaboration with Community Health Systems—Collaborates with Members of the Community in the Delivery of Health and Social Services and Utilizes Knowledge of Community Health Systems and Resources to Function as a School–Community Liaison
    • Identifies community agencies as resources for students and families and evaluates each for appropriateness for clients' needs, to include eligibility criteria, costs, accessibility, and other factors that may impact on services to clients
    • Communicates and networks with community health providers regarding client interventions as appropriate
    • Functions as a client facilitator when collaborating with community providers as appropriate
    • Participates in and encourages the development of interagency care plans to facilitate cohesive intervention with clients
    • Functions as a liaison for the school in ongoing school–community agency cooperation and collaboration related to health issues
    • Participates in community health needs assessments as necessary
    • Participates in the assessment of the potential for the establishment of school–community collaborative health projects
    • Participates in community health activities as an individual or as a representative of the school system
    Section 8: Health Education—Assists Students, Families, and the School Community to Achieve Optimal Levels of Wellness through Appropriately Designed and Delivered Health Education
    • Participates in the assessment of health education needs for the school community
    • Identifies sources of and evaluates health curricula, instructional materials, and educational activities for use in school district
    • Acts as a resource person to school staff regarding health education and health education material
    • Promotes and participates in the integration of health concepts within the regular school curriculum
    • Promotes and collaborates in the application of health-promotion principles within all areas of the school community
    • Provides formal health instruction within the classroom
    • Uses sound learning and developmental theories in the provision of formal classroom health instruction
    • Provides individual health teaching and counseling for students and families as needed
    • Provides health instruction for student, staff, and parent groups
    • Promotes student, staff, and school safety through health education
    Section 9: Research—Contributes to Nursing and School Health through Innovations in Practice and Participation in Research or Research-Related Activities
    • Identifies issues of concern, patterns of health/illness, function/disability, utilization of services, or other phenomena as potential research questions
    • Develops or participates in research studies related to the issue(s) identified
    • Uses systematic research methods to collect and analyze data pertaining to research questions
    • Complies with school district policy and federal guidelines regarding protection of human subjects in research studies
    • Applies results of research findings to the improvement of school nursing practice, development of institutional policies and procedures, guidelines for client care, program development, professional development, staffing, and other institutional issues
    • Collaborates with researchers from outside institutions whose research aims have legitimate health or educational purposes
    Section 10: Professional Development—Identifies, Delineates, and Clarifies the Nursing Role, Promotes Quality of Care, Pursues Continued Professional Enhancement, and Demonstrates Professional Conduct
    • Pursues continued professional growth and development through educational programs and national certification
      • demonstrates sensitivity to the politics and organizational structure of the school system
      • conducts self-evaluation
    • Participates in school nurse professional activities at local, state, and national levels
    Indicators of Effective School Counseling

    A key to a comprehensive guidance and counseling program is a credible system for counselor evaluation. In drawing conclusions about counselor performance, evaluators are asked to rely on data gathered from the Counselor Action Plan and the standards of practice expected of counselors in the Sioux Falls School District. These performance standards function as a basis for counselor evaluation and also serve as a guide for self-evaluation.

    Standard 1: Plan and Deliver the Counseling Program
    • Completes counselor actions and carries out goals of the counseling program
      • prepares Counselor Action Plan
      • monitors completion of counselor actions
      • achieves the stated actions listed on the individual Counselor Action Plan
    • Utilizes materials and processes appropriate to the needs and developmental level of students
      • selects, develops, or adapts relevant resources and strategies
      • manages equipment, facilities, and budget
    • Manages time effectively
      • meets timelines listed on the Counselor Action Plan
      • maximizes use of time available for counseling and strives to minimize time spent on noncounseling activities
    Standard 2: Provide Appropriate Services to Staff, Parents, and Community
    • Establishes professional relationships and consults with staff
      • provides opportunities for staff consultation
      • establishes rapport with staff
      • provides relevant information regarding students' needs
      • participates in teacher–student–counselor conferences
      • presents in-services, workshops, or other activities that promote human relations skills
    • Shares student information with staff within the ethical and legal limits of confidentiality
      • communicates appropriate student information to staff
      • uses discretion in handling confidential information
    • Serves as a liaison between school district and community agencies
      • demonstrates understanding of the roles and responsibilities of community agencies
      • establishes and maintains collaborative working relationships with individuals, educational institutions, and community agencies
      • makes referrals to district and agency programs
    • Consults with parents regarding the personal, social, education, and career development of students
      • demonstrates understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and personal circumstances of parents
      • exhibits sensitivity and acceptance necessary for establishing rapport with parents
      • communicates with parents regarding student needs
      • presents workshops for parents when appropriate
      • conducts home visits when needed
    Standard 3: Use Applicable Counseling Skills
    • Utilizes individual counseling strategies to facilitate change
      • uses a theory base to provide counseling
      • encourages people to assume responsibility for their own behaviors
      • exhibits sensitivity, empathy, and acceptance for each individual
    • Conducts group counseling activities
      • uses a theoretical model for groups
      • demonstrates knowledge of group dynamics
      • organizes and facilitates groups
    • Establishes rapport with students
      • communicates effectively
      • acts as a student advocate
      • respects individuals and is considerate of their needs
    • Utilizes varied techniques to enhance student learning
      • assists teachers in identifying learning styles
      • communicates with parents and teachers regarding student academic performance
      • works with staff to inform students about study skills and test-taking techniques
      • refers students to school and community programs
    • Registers students
      • considers the student's educational and career goals in the development of the registration plan
      • involves students, parents, and teachers when registering
      • provides assistance in post–high school planning
    • Interprets standardized test results
      • assists students, staff, and parents with the understanding of standardized tests
      • respects the confidential nature of test information
    Standard 4: Perform in a Professional Manner
    • Maintains professional ethics
      • observes ethical standards of the American School Counselor Association and the American Counseling Association
      • adheres to district policies and legal guidelines
      • is aware of personal and professional limitations
    • Reviews current educational and counseling theories, practices, issues, and trends
      • reads and shares articles from professional publications
      • attends classes, seminars, and workshops to enhance knowledge and skills
    • Maintains confidentiality
      • practices the ethical and legal conditions of confidentiality
      • provides adequate communication to teachers, parents, administrators, and other referral sources without violating confidentiality
    • Speaks and writes clearly
      • uses appropriate vocabulary
      • facilitates understanding through oral and written communication
    • Demonstrates resourcefulness and self-motivation
      • adapts counseling techniques and methods to individual situations • is knowledgeable of personal, educational, and career resources
    • Accepts and uses constructive criticism to enhance self-development and job performance
      • seeks information and feedback relative to job performance
      • sets goals and monitors areas of performance
    • Participates in professional growth activities and organizations
      • holds professional membership and supports the work of the organization
      • attends in-service offerings
      • serves on committees or accepts other leadership opportunities
    • Presents the counseling program to students, staff, parents, and community
      • uses a variety of strategies to communicate the counseling program
      • assists students, parents, and staff to understand the counseling program
    • Contributes ideas to improve the climate and operation of the school
      • participates in committee meetings
      • cooperates with the staff in addressing school goals and concerns
    Appendix/Forms

    All observation and evaluation forms are available on the district's website. The forms are structured so that you can type in the information.

    Form A: Classroom Observation Worksheet

    Name: ______________________

    Date: ________________

    Class/Course: _________________

    Observation Rubric

    H—Teacher demonstrated high level of mastery on this trait

    E—Teacher consistently demonstrated evidence of this trait

    A—Teacher attempted to address this trait, but evidence was inconsistent

    NE—Teacher demonstrated no evidence of this trait

    NA—This trait was not applicable to this observation

    Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Instruction

    The way in which curriculum is planned, implemented, and evaluated in the classroom so as to address the needs of all students. The appropriate use of research-based strategies to improve student learning.

    Classroom Management

    The establishment of a safe, orderly, and positive learning environment.

    Planning

    ______ Plans instructional tasks that are meaningful and related to learning goals

    Implementing

    ______ Implements district curriculum

    ______ Maintains a strong instructional focus utilizing the elements of effective instruction

    ______ Communicates a high level of expectation

    ______ Communicates clear learning goals to students

    ______ Adapts instruction to meet the needs of all students

    ______ Addresses various learning styles

    ______ Sequences content at an appropriate pace

    ______ Uses appropriate level of questioning to promote understanding

    ______ Relates lesson content to prior and future learning

    ______ Requires students to summarize information in written and/or verbal form

    ______ Appropriately recognizes and reinforces individual student effort

    ______ Represents knowledge/information nonlinguistically through a variety of methods

    ______ Organizes students in cooperative or ability groups when appropriate

    ______ Requires students to analyze and apply knowledge

    ______ Displays enjoyment, humor, and enthusiasm for teaching and expects students to enjoy learning Evaluating

    ______ Conducts ongoing assessments for learning

    ______ Provides reteaching and/or interventions when appropriate

    ______ Has established appropriate classroom rules and procedures that are clearly understood by all students

    ______ Effectively and consistently enforces rules and follows procedures

    ______ Redirects students naturally and immediately without disrupting others

    ______ Is well organized and has all materials, equipment, and so forth ready for immediate use

    ______ Carries out smooth and effective transitions (e.g., from one activity to another, as students enter and leave the room)

    ______ Maximizes time on purposeful instructional tasks

    ______ Begins and ends class period with focus on learning

    ______ Has established a positive learning environment (e.g., supportive, collaborative, and good rapport with students)

    Notes: ________________________
    Recommendations: ________________________
    Form B: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Professional Staff Classroom Evaluation Form

    Form C: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Professional Staff Summative Evaluation Form

    Form D: Plan of Assistance Form

    Form E: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Professional Growth Plan Form

    Form F: Professional Growth Plan Options
    • INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

      An individual or team can design an instructional improvement plan to improve student achievement. The plan must focus on building-level goals as identified in the school improvement plan or the district goals and strategies document.

      The Process:

      • Staff member(s) identifies a research question.
      • A research plan is developed. The plan must include strategies to be implemented, data collection and analysis, timeline, and method of sharing with the learning community.
      • The plan is implemented, monitored, and revised based on data analysis.
      • The staff member(s) complete a written reflective summary highlighting their personal contributions and accomplishments and share findings with other staff members through collaboration time, staff meetings, in-service sessions, or other avenues of professional development.
    • CURRICULUM

      B1. Curriculum Development: A process in which an individual or team participates in the district curriculum and assessment writing associated with major curriculum review studies led by Curriculum Services. Staff members apply and are selected to participate in the curriculum and assessment study.

      Once selected, the staff member will:

      • Analyze state and district standards.
      • Align standards in a K–12 curriculum.
      • Become familiar with the best-practices research related to the content area.
      • Assist in the selection of materials and/or resources to support the curriculum implementation.
      • Plan for professional development to support curriculum implementation.
      • Assist in the writing of assessments to measure curriculum success.
      • Assist in the writing of curriculum guides reflective of the new curriculum, resources, and assessments.
      • Complete a written reflective summary highlighting their personal contributions and accomplishments and share findings with other staff members through collaboration time, staff meetings, in-service sessions, or other avenues of professional development.

      B2. Curriculum Enhancement: A process in which an individual or team analyzes the standards within the current district curriculum. This analysis must include unpacking the standards, designing 21st-century lessons, and writing assessments linked to the standards. The Process:

      • Staff member(s) identify the curriculum need.
      • Design an action plan that includes a timeline for analyzing standards, designing 21st-century lessons, and writing informal assessments.
      • The plan is implemented, monitored, and revised based on data analysis.
      • The staff member(s) complete a written reflective summary highlighting their personal contributions and accomplishments and share findings with other staff members through collaboration time, staff meetings, in-service sessions, or other avenues of professional development.
    • PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PRESENTATIONS

      A process in which the staff member works with the principals/supervisors and school improvement teams to direct or lead staff development sessions tied to the school improvement plan and/or district goals and strategies document. Following the sessions, the staff member will solicit feedback to determine effectiveness of delivery. A summative written report will be generated.

    • PEER COACHING

      A confidential process through which staff members share their expertise and provide one another with feedback, support, and assistance for the purpose of defining present skills, learning new skills, and/or solving classroom-related problems.

      Things to include in the peer coaching plan:

      • Attend a district-led peer coaching seminar to learn about best practices in peer coaching
      • Goal/plan—target instructional strategies to improve student learning; how often to observe each other; how and how often to provide feedback; and other meeting times
      • How often: weekly communication and two observations per team member per quarter with feedback sessions
      • Design a feedback form related to the strategy
      • Documentation of observations and feedback
      • Evaluation—reflective summary of the relationship between the strategy and student learning
    Form G: Sioux Falls Schools 49-5 Library Staff Performance Evaluation Form

    Form H: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Speech/Language Staff Evaluation Form

    Form I: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Psychology Staff Evaluation Form

    Form J: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Social Worker Evaluation Form

    Form K: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Social Worker Performance Evaluation Form

    Form L: Sioux Falls Schools 49-5 Nursing Staff Site Evaluation Form

    Form M: Sioux Fall School District 49-5 Counselor Performance Evaluation Form

    Form N: Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Counselor Evaluation Form

    Form O: Sioux Falls School District Counselor Action Evaluation Form

    Appendix B: Administrator Evaluation Handbook

    SOURCE: Sioux Falls School District.

    Introduction

    It is our desire as administrators/educators to encourage all professional persons to take an active role in their own personal and professional growth. The intent of this instrument is to enable each person to develop to his or her highest potential by providing room for creativity, risk taking, and individualism as well as to evaluate job performance.

    Purpose of Evaluation

    The purpose of evaluation of administrative staff shall be assessment of performance, assessment of professional growth, and determination of future employment.

    Evaluation shall be a joint process that includes both the evaluator and the person being evaluated. The process will provide a framework for communication between supervisor and administrator involved in the evaluation process.

    Definition of Terms

    Probationary Administrator—an administrator in his/her first, second, or third year of employment in an administrative position with the Sioux Falls School District.

    Veteran Administrator—an administrator in his/her fourth year or beyond of employment as an administrator with the Sioux Falls School District.

    Performance Improvement Plan—a plan to help an administrator improve deficiencies in performance.

    Guidelines for Setting Goals
    • Goals must be compatible with the district's mission and philosophy.
    • Goals must be mutually selected and address building/department needs, school improvement plans, and district needs.
    • The number of goals established should be mutually agreed on with the evaluator but should be in the range of three to five goals.
    • Goals must be as specific and quantitative as possible.

    **Goals for Southeast Technical Institute administrators must be compatible with the mission and philosophy of Southeast.

    Evaluation Timelines
    Probationary Administrators
    • The preconference to establish goals must be completed by November 1.
    • The first summary conference must be held before the end of first semester.
    • The final evaluation, including the second-semester summary conference, will be held on or before the last day of the administrator's work year but no later than June 30.
    • Interim conferences to determine progress shall be held throughout the year.
    Veteran Administrators
    • The preconference to establish goals must be completed by November 1.
    • The final evaluation, including the summary conference, will be held on or before the last day of the administrator's work year, but no later than June 30.
    • Interim conferences to determine progress shall be held throughout the year.
    • An unsatisfactory evaluation may result in a Performance Improvement Plan being developed.
    • A veteran administrator may be placed on a Performance Improvement Plan at any time during the evaluation process.
    • Administrators may attach a demurral to the evaluation report.
    Evaluation Procedures

    An orientation session for new administrators will be held by September 15. The Evaluation Handbook will be distributed along with the Indicators of an Effective Administrator and the Evaluation Timelines.

    • Probationary Administrators
      • Administrators in their first through third full years of employment will be evaluated once each semester, twice a year.
      • The evaluation shall include a goal-setting conference and mutually selected goals that address building needs and the school improvement plan.
      • Administrators will be evaluated based on the accomplishment of their goals or the progress made toward accomplishing a multiyear goal and the areas outlined in the Indicators of an Effective Administrator.
    • Veteran Administrators
      • The evaluation shall include a goal-setting conference and mutually selected goals that address building needs and the school improvement plan.
      • Veteran administrators will be evaluated based on the accomplishment of their goals or the progress made toward accomplishing a multiyear goal.
    • A summative evaluation conference will be held prior to the end of the administrator's work year but no later than June 30.
    Performance Improvement Plan

    A Performance Improvement Plan is intended to help an administrator improve deficiencies in performance.

    • The supervisor shall develop the Performance Improvement Plan, including the following components:
      • Statement of deficiencies
      • Objectives/goals to be met
      • Program the administrator must follow
      • Measurement criteria
      • Assistance to be provided
      • Monitoring system, including timelines
      • Consequences of not correcting deficiencies
    • The administrator may request another administrator, in addition to the supervisor, to act as a mentor in the development of the Performance Improvement Plan.
    • An administrator placed upon a Performance Improvement Plan will receive no increase in compensation or step while the plan is active. Movement on the schedule will begin after successful completion of the plan, effective for the next contract year.
    • If the administrator disagrees with the final recommendation resulting from the Performance Improvement Plan, he or she may request a review of the evaluation with the superintendent. The review conference shall be held within 3 weeks of receipt of the request.
    • If the superintendent is the immediate supervisor and evaluator, the request for a review may be made to the school board. If the superintendent's final recommendation is for nonrenewal, the procedures identified in the negotiated agreement, Section IV (A–C) will go into effect.
    Performance Standards
    Character

    Extraordinary leaders are considerate of others, sensitive to others' needs, trustworthy, optimistic, and positive. They motivate and inspire others, moving forward even when times are ambiguous. When unethical things are being done, they are assertive by speaking up for what is right and just. Living as a model of high personal integrity and honesty is the trademark of the extraordinary leader.

    Personal Capability

    Extraordinary leaders demonstrate excellent professional/technical expertise and use their strong analytical skills in problem solving. They develop good relationships with others, frequently serving as coaches and mentors. They demonstrate good listening skills and are open to others and respectful in their interactions. Setting high standards for themselves and others, taking initiative in problem solving, being innovative, and encouraging innovation are actions that are characteristic of extraordinary leaders. They welcome challenges, take risks, learn from their successes and failures, and engage in their own self-development.

    Focus on Results

    Extraordinary leaders are committed to quality and demonstrate total dedication to obtaining results. They have a clear vision of the school mission and take the initiative to secure the human and material resources needed to promote student and staff growth. They gain the support of others by implementing a plan of action for which they hold themselves personally accountable. Gaining the support of others to meet challenging goals is an attribute of the extraordinary leader.

    Interpersonal Skills

    Extraordinary leaders are trusted individuals who demonstrate positive optimism with high personal integrity toward others. They seek to empower others by listening to them and engaging them in collaborative teamwork. They attempt to include all people and demonstrate a genuine concern for others. Motivating others to achieve stretch goals, recognizing and praising others, and developing their own skills are actions of the extraordinary leader.

    Leading Change

    Extraordinary leaders are skilled at strategic planning that focuses on student growth. They are adept at gathering information, analyzing data, solving problems, gathering data, and planning action. They are champions for change and engage in risk taking as they seek innovative ways to achieve results. Being aware of a broader world is characteristic of the extraordinary leader.

    Zenger, J., & Folkman, J. (2005). Extraordinary leader. Utah: Zenger Folkman Company.

    Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Administrator Evaluation Form

    Sioux Falls School District 49-5 Administrator Evaluation Performance Improvement Plan

    About the Authors

    Bruce M. Whitehead is a NAESP Nationally Distinguished Principal and has served for more than 30 years as a principal for School District # 4 in Missoula, Montana. He is also a state representative for the National Association of Elementary School Principals as well as serving as an adjunct professor for the University of Montana. His career includes appointments to numerous national and international committees as well as serving as president of the Montana Association of Elementary School Principals and the Montana State Reading Association. He also served as chairman of Montana's first Governor's Task Force on Technology as well as being an NCATE Advisor. As a coauthor of 10 books and numerous articles in the field of education, Dr. Whitehead is a recipient of the University of Montana's highest honor, the Montana Distinguished Alumni Award. Additional honors include: the International Reading Association's Presidential Service Award, NASA Explorer Schools Leadership Award, National Milken Foundation's Outstanding Educator Award, John F. Kennedy Center's Award for Arts in Education, Outstanding Contributions to Saudi Arabian Education, and Japan's International Soroban Institute Award.

    Floyd Boschee has an extensive background in teaching and educational administration. He has served as a teacher, coach, and school administrator in the public schools and as a professor and chairman of departments of education at the collegiate level. Dr. Boschee is professor emeritus in the Division of Educational Administration, School of Education, at the University of South Dakota and a former school board member of the Vermillion School District, Vermillion, South Dakota. During his tenure as a university professor, he consulted with school districts on reorganization; published numerous articles in major educational journals; and conducted workshops on curriculum development and implementation, the teaching and learning process, and school administrator evaluations. He is the author or coauthor of 11 books in the fields of school administration and curriculum leadership.

    Robert H. Decker is professor of educational leadership in the Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education at the University of Northern Iowa. He has been at UNI for 28 years and presently is coordinator of the K–12 Educational Leadership Doctoral Program. Within those 28 years, he has taught in both the principal- and superintendent-preparation programs. Dr. Decker has been a K–12 teacher, secondary principal, and central office administrator in public and private schools in Illinois and Missouri. During his professional career, he has been a presenter at state, national, and international conferences and has written more than 30 articles and two books as well as consulted with more than 100 school districts and educational agencies, both nationally and internationally, on evaluation, negotiations, technology, and educational change. Presently, he is assisting school districts on hiring practices and organizational change efforts to enhance and increase student achievement.


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