Part 1: Epistemology, Psychology of Science, and the Foundations of Psychology Next Chapter

D. Campbell, S. Fuller, B. Gholson, R. N. Giere, R. F. Kitchener, S. Koch, J. Maffie, W. V. O. Quine, J. Royce, J. Royce, B. F. Skinner & L. S. Smith

In: The Philosophy of Psychology

Part 1: Epistemology, Psychology of Science, and the Foundations of Psychology

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Epistemology, Psychology of Science, and the Foundations of Psychology
Epistemology, psychology of science, and the foundations of psychology

As indicated in our general introduction, psychologists (at least since the late nineteenth century) have been interested in the underlying philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual bases of their discipline. Sometimes this set of questions has been termed ‘philosophy of psychology’, sometimes ‘metatheory’, but psychologists have invariably been drawn toward traditional philosophical issues: issues in

(1) epistemology, including, in particular, issues in scientific methodology and philosophy of science, (2) metaphysics, especially the philosophy of mind and, more recently, semantic theory, and (3) normative issues, issues concerning ethics but also what we can call epistemic values.

Traditionally, methodological issues were taken to be primary since they were concerned with how to do psychology, ...

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