Previous Chapter Chapter 8: The Integration of Biological and Genetic Factors into Social Learning Theory Next Chapter

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

The Integration of Biological and Genetic Factors into Social Learning Theory
The integration of biological and genetic factors into social learning theory
JamieVaskeWestern Carolina University

Social learning theory has traditionally been a criminological theory that is grounded in sociology and behavioral psychology. Edwin Sutherland (1939), a sociologist by training, argued that people engage in crime because they have been taught to engage in crime. Specifically, he noted that criminal behavior and attitudes favorable to crime are learned through social interaction with others. Social interaction that is frequent, occurs early in life, is of long duration, and is emotionally relevant will have the greatest effect on behavior. Also, individuals will engage in criminal behavior when their attitudes favoring criminal behavior outweigh their attitudes favoring prosocial behavior. While Sutherland's ...

Looks like you are not subscribed to have access to full content on this book.

Please login or subscribe to get access.

If your Institution does not have a subscription and you cannot access the full text of content on the site, find out how your Institution can subscribe.

Back to Top