Previous Chapter Chapter 25: Policy Implications of Sociological Theories of Crime: Why Are They So Seldom Considered or Discussed? Next Chapter

Danielle J.S. Bailey, Robert Lytle & Lisa L. Sample

In: The Nurture Versus Biosocial Debate in Criminology: On the Origins of Criminal Behavior and Criminality

Chapter 25: Policy Implications of Sociological Theories of Crime: Why Are They So Seldom Considered or Discussed?

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Policy Implications of Sociological Theories of Crime: Why Are They So Seldom Considered or Discussed?
Policy implications of sociological theories of crime: Why are they so seldom considered or discussed?
Danielle J.S.BaileyUniversity of Nebraska at Omaha
RobertLytleUniversity of Nebraska at Omaha
Lisa L.SampleUniversity of Nebraska at Omaha

Although criminal behavior is often associated with individual character traits, people do not live, think, or act in a vacuum. People make decisions within a sociological context that includes families, friends, schools, neighborhoods, towns, and cities. We, therefore, explored, developed, and tested sociological theories of crime. After years of testing these theories, and generally finding strong significant associations between several sociological factors and crime, these explanatory factors typically receive little media attention, rarely garner legislative consideration, and seldom find their way ...

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