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Carter Rees & Jacob T.N. Young

In: The Nurture Versus Biosocial Debate in Criminology: On the Origins of Criminal Behavior and Criminality

Chapter 17: Parents, Peers, and Socialization to Institutions in Childhood and Adolescence: Implications for Delinquent Behavior

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Parents, Peers, and Socialization to Institutions in Childhood and Adolescence: Implications for Delinquent Behavior
Parents, peers, and socialization to institutions in childhood and adolescence: Implications for delinquent behavior
CarterReesArizona State University
Jacob T.N.YoungArizona State University
Introduction

Few things provoke sociologists as easily or strongly as the perceivably improper invocation of “biology” as an explanatory device, especially when done on sociologists' own turf.

—Freese, Li, & Wade, 2003

While not official, disciplines often informally claim particular topics as their property. The violation of rules, and the social causes, is a key territory in the social sciences for which the property deed traces back nearly 400 years (e.g., Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan, 1668/1994). The leitmotif of a scientific understanding of crime and criminality in sociology has been the focus on the performance of ...

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