Team Teaching: What, Why, and How?

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Francis J. Buckley

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    Dedication

    To my friends and mentors:

    Edwin McDermott, S.J., and Maria de la Cruz Aymes, S.H. With deep gratitude and affection

    Preface: Why Bother with This Book?

    Imagine actively taking part in a psychology class taught by Freud, Adler, and Jung. Not just passively listening to Steve Allen's Classical Conversations or watching Roundtable Discussions or Bill Moyers interviewing Huston Smith or Joseph Campbell about religion. Those taped sessions garnered an audience of thousands, eventually millions. But the audience could not interrupt and ask questions of their own. They could only look and listen.

    What an opportunity, to sit in a classroom over the course of a semester and enter into dialogue with

    • Carl Sagan, Françoise Sagan, and Fritjof Capra as they argue about the nature of the universe
    • Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, and a team of contemporary anthropologists differing on how to get to know and appreciate people of another culture
    • Hannah Arendt with Generals MacArthur and Eisenhower and Patton analyzing World War II for a class at West Point
    • Pablo Picasso, Jacques Derrida, and Ingmar Bergman discussing modern civilization with Mother Teresa

    Would you want to take part in any of those sessions?

    No wonder that teachers and students are excited about team teaching! All books on team teaching are out of print, but hundreds of periodical articles show a lively interest in the topic. This book will provide an overview with helpful advice. It will explain how and why team teaching works. It will try to answer questions about team teaching with a detailed and comprehensive review of research material and with practical applications, written in a clear, readable style. The nature, purpose, types, history, and evaluation of team teaching will be covered. The book will also treat the resources needed and the roles of teachers, students, and administrators. It will strengthen the case of those who want to try this innovative approach, comparing and contrasting it with other teaching techniques. Its underlying premise is that two heads are better than one. Dialogue excites, electrifies. Teaching can be improved by proactive experiments instead of waiting to be forced to catch up with the advances in information, technology, and culture.

    The primary goal of shifting from individual instruction to a team is to improve the quality of teaching and learning. Team teaching is but one of many means to that end, but a very important step along the road of constantly adjusting the educational system to the changing needs of students and abilities of teachers.

    Implementing a team approach is not a simple affair. It will involve faculty, administration, support staff, and students. It will raise issues of management style, interpersonal relations, and educational goals and methods. It will directly affect scheduling, classroom sizes, and budgeting. Indirectly, it will affect instructional media support, faculty and student morale, retention, and recruitment. The chain reaction will change the entire school environment.

    Are the results worth the effort? Emphatically, yes.

    Our thinking frequently is culture bound. Western European and American cultures are highly individualistic, often excessively so. There is good reason to treasure academic freedom. It protects professors with totally new and seemingly outlandish approaches, questions, and ideas. But academic freedom can flourish in classrooms where teachers publicly disagree and model courteous discourse to their students. African and primal societies often welcome teams of shamans or medicine men/women or healers, experts in the lore of that culture, to roll back the forces of ignorance. Middle Eastern and Asian cultures recognize the value of combining insights from several sources in the search for wisdom. Extended families enable children to learn from several teachers simultaneously. All teachers can learn from these cultures.

    Business, sports, space exploration, and medicine have stressed the value of teamwork. These values are brought to academia in the form of team teaching.

    To meet the common objection, ‘It won't work in my field,’ a bibliography of articles and books will provide theory and examples. They show how it can be used by administrators and teachers in a variety of disciplines, in formal and informal settings, and with different age and cultural groups to improve teaching.

    The primary audience of this book will be college teachers and administrators, graduate and undergraduate, in all disciplines, particularly those interested in innovative and effective teaching. It should also be helpful to librarians, teachers, and administrators below the college level.

    This book is the fruit of team teaching in a variety of formats for 30 years, from elementary to graduate school, in religious education and anthropology, sociology, and psychology at the University of San Francisco. Personal care for students and openness to new ideas and techniques have been hallmarks of Jesuit education for over four centuries. I want to express my thanks to my colleagues and students. They have taught me much over the years. I am especially indebted to Edwin McDermott, S.J., and Maria de la Cruz Aymes, S.H. We have laughed and fought and prayed and learned with students all over the world.

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    About the Author

    Francis J. Buckley, S. J., is Professor of Systematic and Pastoral Theology at the University of San Francisco. He received a doctorate in theology from the Gregorian University in Rome and did postdoctoral research in educational psychology at the University of Michigan. He has served as President of the College Theology Society in the United States and Canada and has taught in various countries at the elementary, secondary, undergraduate, and graduate levels, often offering team-taught courses that integrate theology and anthropology, communication arts, education, management, psychology, and sociology.


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