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The digital age is also a surveillance age. Today, computerized systems protect and manage our everyday life; the increasing number of surveillance cameras in public places, the computerized loyalty systems of the retail sector, geo-localized smart–phone applications, or smart traffic and navigation systems. Surveillance is nothing fundamentally new, and yet more and more questions are being asked:  • Who monitors whom, and how and why?  • How do surveillance techniques affect socio-spatial practices and relationships?  • How do they shape the fabrics of our cities, our mobilities, the spaces of the everyday?  • And what are the implications in terms of border control and the exercise of political power? Surveillance and Space responds to these modern questions by exploring the complex and varied interactions between ...

Surveillance, Authority and Expertise
Surveillance, Authority and Expertise

The cameras … in Tiananmen Square were sold as advanced traffic control systems by Siemens Plessey. Yet after the 1989 massacre of students, there followed a witch hunt when the authorities tortured and interrogated thousands in an effort to ferret out the subversives. The Scoot surveillance system with USA-made Pelco cameras was used to faithfully record the protests. The images were repeatedly broadcast over Chinese television offering a reward for information, with the result that nearly all the transgressors were identified. (Wright, 1998: 17)

The preceding account of the 1989 Tiananmen massacre highlights a point that is often missing in media narratives of the incidents, by pointing at the Western origin of the cameras used for monitoring and ...

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