Stardom and Celebrity: A Reader

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Sean Redmond & Su Holmes

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    Notes on Contributors

    Theodor W. Adorno (1903–1969) was a German sociologist, philosopher, musicologist and composer. He was a member of the Frankfurt School along with Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin, Herbert Marcuse and Jürgen Habermas. His publications include Aesthetic Theory (University of Minnesota Press, 1998).

    Francesco Alberoni is an Italian sociologist, journalist and professor in Sociology. He was a board member and senior board member (chairman) of Rai, the national Italian Television, from 2002 to 2005.

    Roland Barthes (1915–1980) was a French literary critic, social theorist and semiotician. His publications include Mythologies (Paladin, 1973) and Camera Lucida (Hill and Wang, 1982).

    Jean Baudrillard is a cultural theorist with a special interest in the postmodern. His publications include Simulacra and Simulation (University of Michigan Press, 1995) and Âmerica (Verso, 1989).

    Mary C. Beltrán is Assistant Professor in Communication Arts and Chicana and Latina Studies at the University of Wisconsin. Her publications include, ‘The New Hollywood Racelessness: Only the Fast, Furious (and Multi-Racial) Will Survive’ (Cinema Journal 44:2, Winter 2005: 50–67).

    Walter Benjamin (1892–1940) was a German Jewish Marxist and mystic who was concerned with modernity, industrialization and the role that visual-based technologies, such as photography and film, played in transforming peoples perception of, and access to, art and culture. His publications include Illuminations (Shocken, 1969).

    Leo Braudy is University Professor and Bing Professor of English at the University of Southern California. His publications include The Frenzy of the Renown: Fame and its History (Oxford University Press, 1986), Native Informant: Essays on Film, Fiction and Popular Culture (Oxford University Press, 1992) and From Chivalry to Terrorism: War and the Changing Nature of Masculinity (Alfred Knopf, 2003).

    Nick Couldry is Professor of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of numerous books, including The Place of Media Power: Pilgrims and Witnesses of the Media Age (Routledge, 2000), Inside Culture (Sage, 2000) and Media Rituals: A Critical Approach (Routledge, 2003).

    Richard deCordova (1956–1996) was Lecturer in Film and Television at DePaul University, Chicago. He was the author of the seminal Picture Personalities: The Emergence of the Star System in America (University of Illinois Press, 1990).

    Philip Drake is Lecturer in Film and Media Studies at the University of Stirling. He has published numerous articles on celebrity and stardom, screen performance, memory and film music, and intellectual property rights. He is currently writing a book on the political economy of stardom in Hollywood cinema and is co-editing a forthcoming edition of the journal Cultural Politics on the politics of celebrity.

    Richard Dyer is Professor of Film Studies at King's College, London, UK. His publications include Stars (BFI, 1978) and Heavenly Bodies: Film Stars and Society (Macmillan, 1987).

    John Ellis is Professor of Media Arts and Head of Department at Royal Holloway University of London. He is the author of Seeing Things (I.B. Tauris, 2000) and Visible Fictions (Routledge, 1982).

    Rebecca L. Epstein is a research student at the University of California, Los Angeles.

    Mary Flanagan is an artist; inventor-designer-activist, who presently teaches at Hunter College in Manhattan. Her essays on digital art, cyberculture and gaming have appeared in periodicals such as Art Journal, Wide Angle, Convergence, and Culture Machine, as well as several books. Her co-edited collection, Reload: Rethinking Women and Cyberculture, was published by MIT Press in 2002.

    Joshua Gamson is Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of San Francisco. His publications include Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America (University of California Press, 1994) and Freaks Talk Back: Tabloid Talk Shows and Sexual Nonconformity (Chicago University Press, 1998).

    Christine Geraghty is Professor of Film and Television Studies and Head of Department at the University of Glasgow. She is the author of Women and Soap Opera (Polity, 1991); British Cinema in the Fifties: Gender, Genre and the ‘New Look’ (Routledge, 2000) which takes an historical and cultural approach to textual analysis; and (with David Lusted) The Television Studies Book (Arnold, 1998), a collection of varied essays on contemporary television.

    Lisa Holderman is an Assistant Professor of Communications in the Department of English, Communications and Theater Arts at Arcadia University. She is currently working upon an edited collection titled Common Sense: Intelligence as Presented on Popular Television, Lexington Books, 2008.

    Su Holmes is Reader in Television Studies at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of Coming to a TV Near You!: British TV and Film Culture in the 1950s (Intellect Books, 2005), and Entertaining Television: The BBC and Popular Programme Culture in the 1950s (Manchester University Press, forthcoming 2008). She is the co-editor of Understanding Reality Television (Routledge, 2004) and Framing Celebrity: New Directions in Celebrity Culture (Routledge, 2004).

    Max Horkheimer (February 14, 1895-July 7, 1973) was a Jewish-German philosopher and sociologist, known especially as the founder and guiding thinker of the Frankfurt School of critical theory. His publications include, Critical Theory (Continum, 1975).

    Jo Littler is Senior Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at Middlesex University. Her research primarily focuses on the politics of consumer culture, and she edited the ‘Celebrity’ issue of Mediactive (Lawrence & Wishart, 2003).

    Catharine Lumby is Associate Professor at the University of Sydney. She is the author of Bad Girls: The Media, Sex and Feminism in the 90s (Allen and Unwin, 1997), Gotcha! Life in a Tabloid World (Allen and Unwin, 1999) and co-editor of Remote Control: New Media, New Ethics (Cambridge University Press, 2003).

    Wenche Ommundsen is Associate Dean – Research, Deakin University, Australia. She is the author of Metafictions (1993) and the editor/co-editor of Refractions: Asian/Australian Writing (1995), From a Distance: Australian Writers and Cultural Displacement (1996), Appreciating Difference: Writing Postcolonial Literary History (1998) and Bastard Moon: Essays on Chinese-Australian Writing (2001).

    Sean Redmond is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at Victoria University, Wellington. He is the co-editor of Framing Celebrity: New Directions in Celebrity Culture (Routledge, 2006) and Hollywood Transgressor: the Cinema of Kathryn Bigelow (Wallflower Press, 2003). He has research interests in stars and celebrities, whiteness, film authorship, genre, and black and Asian cinema.

    Chris Rojek is Professor of Sociology and Culture at Nottingham Trent University. He is the author of numerous books, including Stuart Hall (Polity, 2003), Celebrity (Reaktion, 2001) and Frank Sinatra (Polity, 2004).

    Jackie Stacey is Professor in the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University. She is the author of Stargazing: Hollywood Cinema and Female Spectatorship (Routledge, 1994), the co-author (with Sarah Franklin and Celia Lury) of Global Nature, Global Culture: Gender, ‘Race’ and Life Itself in the Late Twentieth Century (Sage, 2000) and the co-editor of books such as Screen Histories: A Screen Reader (Oxford University Press, 1999).

    Graeme Turner is Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of Queensland. His numerous publications include Understanding Celebrity (Sage, 2004), The Film Cultures Reader (Routledge, 2002) and Ending the Affair: the decline of television current affairs in Australia (UNSW Press, 2005).

    Yiman Wang is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies and Comparative Literature at Haverford College. She has published numerous book chapters and articles, invited book reviews, and she has translated books from Chinese into English and from English into Chinese. Wang currently has four papers under review.

    Max Weber (1864–1920) was a German political economist and sociologist who is credited with founding the modern study of sociology. Weber's work was concerned with religion and government in terms of an increasing rationalization of everyday social action. Weber thought that individual actors were trapped in an ‘iron cage’ of rationalized control.

    Rebecca Williams is a PhD student in the Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University. Her research topic is genre, distinction and fan community/hierarchy. She has published work in Slayage: The On-Line Journal of Buffy Studies and Reading Angel: The TV Spin-off with a Soul (ed. by Stacey Abbott, I.B. Tauris, 2005), and co-authored work on celebrity for The European Journal of Cultural Studies.

    Acknowledgements

    The editors wish to thank Julia Hall at Sage for her advice and encouragement throughout the development of this book. Southampton Solent University and Victoria University of Wellington provided much needed grant support to help with research and development. As always, immense gratitude goes to our family friends, students and colleagues for listening to talk about fame.

    SR: to Georgie Best – the Belfast Boy – for your marvellous feet and your way with words. And to Dad for letting me be.

    SH: to Deborah Jermyn and Nick Rumens for providing (as always) intellectual and personal support, and for always listening.

    Permission given by the following copyright holders and authors for the extracts and articles in this collection is gratefully acknowledged.

    Extract from Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, ‘The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception’, Adorno and Horkheimer Dialectic of Enlightenment, London: Verso. Reprinted with permission of the publisher © 1972. Extract from Jean Baudrillard, ‘The Ecstasy of Communication’, Hal Foster (ed) Postmodern Culture, London: Pluto (1983). Reprinted with permission from the publisher © 1983. Extract from Roland Barthes, ‘Myth Today’ and ‘Garbo's Face’, Barthes, Mythologies, London: Paladin (1973). Reprinted with permission of the publisher © and Barthe's Estate. Extract from Roland Barthes ‘Part Two’, Barthes, Camera Lucida, London: Jonathan Cape (1982). Reprinted with permission of the publisher © and Barthe's Estate. Extract from Walter Benjamin, ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’, Benjamin, Illuminations, London: Fontana (1973). Reprinted with permission of the publisher © The Random House Group. Extract from Leo Braudy ‘The Dream of Acceptability’, Braudy. The Frenzy of the Renown: Fame and its History, Oxford: Oxford University Press (1986). Reprinted with permission of the author and the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency © 1986 by Leo Braudy. Extracts from Nick Couldry ‘Media Power: Some Hidden Dimensions’ and ‘The Reality of the Fiction’, Couldry, The Place of Media Power: Pilgrims and Witnesses of the Media Age, London: Routledge (2000). Reprinted with permission of the publisher © 2000 Routledge. Extract from Richard Dyer, ‘Stars’, Dyer, Stars, London: BFI. Reprinted with permission from the publisher © 1979. Extract from Richard Dyer, ‘Introduction’, Dyer, Heavenly Bodies, Basingstoke: Macmillan. Reprinted with permission of the publisher © 1986. Extract from John Ellis, ‘Stars as Cinematic Phenomenon’, Ellis, Visible Fictions, London: Routledge. Reprinted with permission of the publisher © Taylor and Francis Ltd. Extract from Rebecca L. Epstein. ‘Sharon Stone in a Gap Turtleneck’, in David Desser (ed.), Hollywood Goes Shopping, Minneapolis: University of Minneapolis Press. Reprinted with permission of the publisher © 2000 University of Minneapolis Press. Extract from Joshua Gamson, The Assembly Line of Greatness: Celebrity in Twentieth-Century America', Critical Studies in Mass Communication, 9 (1992). Reprinted with permission of the publisher © Taylor and Francis Ltd (1992) (http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals). Christine Geraghty ‘Re-examining Stardom: Questions of Texts, Bodies and Performance’, Christine Gledhill and Linda Williams (eds) Reinventing Film Studies, London: Arbold. Reprinted with permission from the publisher © 2000. Extract from Chris Rojek, ‘Celebrity and Religion’, Rojek, Celebrity, London: Reaktion Books (2001). Reprinted with permission of the publisher © 2001 Reaktion Books. Extract from Jackie Stacey ‘With Stars in Their Eyes: Female Spectators and the Paradoxes of Consumption’, Stacey, Stargazing: Hollywood Cinema and Female Spectatorship, London: Routledge (1994). Reprinted with permission from the publisher © 1994 Routledge. Extract from Graeme Turner, ‘The Economy of Celebrity’, Turner, Understanding Celebrity, London: Sage (2004). Reprinted with permission from the publisher © 2004 Sage. Extract from Max Weber, ‘The Nature of Charismatic Domination’, Weber, From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, Oxford: Oxford University Press (1946). Reprinted with permission of the publisher.

    Whilst every effort has been made to contact owners of copyright material reproduced in this book, we have not always been successful. In the event of a copyright query, please contact the publishers.

    Georgie Best

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