Situating Everyday Life: Practices and Places

Books

Sarah Pink

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  • The Natural Home

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    About the Author

    Sarah Pink is Professor of Social Sciences at Loughborough University. Her research, rooted in anthropology and cognate social sciences engages across disciplines to connect with arts practice and applied agendas in design and engineering. In doing so she seeks to make connections between advances in theoretical scholarship, methodology and practical as well as academic research questions and themes. Her work most recently focuses on a range of everyday, activist and mediated contexts and processes, including questions about how these relate to everyday domestic life, digital media, energy, the construction industry and sus-tainability agendas. Most of her work engages visual and sensory methodologies and she has an enduring interest in the development of innovative methods. Her other books include Home Truths (2004), The Future of Visual Anthropology (2006), Visual Interventions (Editor) (2007), Doing Visual Ethnography (2007, 2nd edition), Doing Sensory Ethnography (2009), and Advances in Visual Methodology (2012).

    Acknowledgements

    This book is an outcome of a series of research projects that I have been involved in over a period of 10 or so years. It draws on and develops further ideas first presented in earlier work, including the books Home Truths (Pink 2004) and Doing Sensory Ethnography (Pink 2009a) as well as a good number of articles published between 2000 and 2011. Yet the synthesis and development of the materials, ideas and arguments developed in this book are new.

    My first thanks, as always are to all the participants in my research who have given up their time to work with me, without them this book would have been impossible. Participation for those who have wished to be further involved meant not only taking part the ethnographic stage but also reading and commenting on some of the texts included in this book. I will not mention everyone by name here since some have preferred to remain anonymous and those who have not are named in the chapters where our collaborations are discussed. I am similarly grateful to the organisations that have funded the ethnographic research projects discussed in this book, and colleagues and friends who have commented on the various chapters, as follows.

    Chapter 4 is based on research undertaken as part of a study titled Cleaning, Homes and Lifestyles undertaken with Unilever Research in 1999, with Katie Deverell. I am grateful to both Unilever and the staff I collaborated with there, for their support in this work. Chapter 5 is also based on research done with Unilever Research, in 2000, as part of a study about the use of laundry tablets in the UK, with Jean Rimmer at Unilever and in collaboration with Marie Corbin. I would also like to thank Nicki Morley of Unilever Research for her support at this publication stage. Much of the inspiration for re-thinking laundry through questions of energy and sustainability has, however, come from my work with colleagues in design and engineering at Loughborough University, and I would also like to acknowledge the influence of this environment on my work.

    Chapters 6 and 7 are based on research funded initially by the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities at Loughborough University and following this by a small grant from the Nuffield Foundation. Chapter 6 was first presented as a keynote lecture at the conference ‘Home and urbanity: cultural perspectives on housing and everyday life’ organised by the Center for Housing and Welfare, Copenhagen University in 2008. I am very grateful to the organisers of the conference for giving me the opportunity to present my work at this event and to the conference participants whose comments on my paper and with whom I discussed its ideas have helped me to develop it into its present form. Elements of Chapter 7 were originally published in ‘Urban Social Movements and Small Places’ in the journal City (Pink 2009b) although these have been re-worked in this book, and the section entitled ‘Histories, memories and biographies: the personal and the collective in Cittaslow carnival’ was previously published in a slightly different form in an article titled ‘Amateur documents?: amateur photographic practice, collective representation and the constitution of place in UK slow cities’ in Visual Studies (2011b). I would also like to thank Cittaslow Aylsham, Aylsham Town Council, Broadland District Council and Norfolk County Council for permissions to publish the images included in Chapter 7 (credits are included in the figure captions). My warmest thanks also go to those past and present members of the Cittaslow committees in UK member towns, who have maintained a continuing interest in support of my work.

    Chapter 8 was written during my sabbatical leave from the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough University in 2010–11. I am very grateful to the University for this time to focus on my research, during which I was a Visiting Scholar at the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3) at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya in Barcelona. I would like to thank the IN3 for hosting my work during this academic year and providing a stimulating intellectual environment in which to develop my ideas about the practices and places of digital and social media. I am also grateful to Andrea Mearns, the Cittaslow International Committee UK Representative, for generously reading and commenting on my discussion of the movement's online presence and to John Postill for his several readings of and comments on this chapter as it developed.

    Finally, I would also like to thank Karen O'Reilly and Lydia Martens for giving up their time to read and comment on Chapter 4 at an earlier stage of the development of this work, to Francesco Lapenta who read and commented on the first draft of the manuscript, to SAGE's anonymous reviewer, and to Chris Rojek and Jai Seaman at SAGE.

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