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Rita Takahashi

In: Restorative Justice Today: Practical Applications

Chapter 24: Restorative Justice Almost 50 Years Later: Japanese American Redress for Exclusion, Restriction, and Incarceration

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Restorative Justice Almost 50 Years Later: Japanese American Redress for Exclusion, Restriction, and Incarceration
Restorative justice almost 50 years later: Japanese American redress for exclusion, restriction, and incarceration
RitaTakahashi

In this chapter, Rita Takahashi, professor of social work at San Francisco State University, provides an account of the belated decision by the U.S. government, after almost 50 years, to help compensate surviving Japanese Americans for the gross violation of their civil and human rights when they were restricted in movement and confined in concentration camps during World War II.

Almost 50 years after violating the human and civil rights of Japanese Americans and infringing their fundamental constitutional rights, the U.S government took actions to officially apologize, provide monetary compensation, and establish a community education fund. Although these actions ...

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