Positive Organizational Behavior

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Edited by: Debra L. Nelson & Cary L. Cooper

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    Preface

    Positive Organizational Behavior has a broad reach, from past organizational research streams buried deep by business school ideology, through the present with its pressing needs and emergent opportunities, to the positive institutions that the future can hold – if we act upon POB's principles.

    POB reanimates a substratum of organizational research's ancient history. A long time ago, before business schools were the primary producers of social science research on organizations, personal growth, interpersonal connection, and worker-employer mutuality were some of organizational research's central themes. Consider Harry Levinson's notion of the psychological contract, as a mutual arrangement meeting deep-seated individual and collective needs; Chris Argyris's focus on authenticity and learning in developing functional interpersonal and organizational relationships; and Douglas McGregor's constructive view of leadership as partnership between managers and workers. To these three scholars, and many of their contemporaries, human growth and betterment were de rigueur in an effective organization. The ensuing years witnessed a change in the implicit model of effective organizations guiding scholarly thinking. Recent organizational research has reflected its business school context, falling more closely in line with traditional economic and financial notions of firm performance. The positive psychology movement, of which this book is a part, provides impetus for organizational behavior to revitalize the concern for human growth and relational mutuality as a mainstay of effective organizing.

    Growth and mutuality are human needs of special import in our own times. The re-emergence of this line of inquiry is a healing reaction to the averse, often traumatic experiences to which global organizations have exposed many employees and their families. Individual growth, compelling future, and a just and supportive workplace are the anchors of a positive organization, features which contrast with those typically found in firms focused narrowly on stock holder interests at the expense of other constituents. Principles for designing positive workplaces may be especially valuable in helping to rehabilitate contemporary firms whose erstwhile strategies have left the workforce physically, emotionally, and economically depleted.

    POB may also be about the future, leading to the design of new ways of organizing. As the colleagues who joined forces to write this book make clear, POB points the way for designing work settings that play to people's strengths, where people can be both their best selves and at their best with each other. By combining positive psychology with an organizational perspective, this book helps make the principles of positive psychology actionable.

    Denise M.Rousseau

    Contributors

    Neal M. Ashkanasy, Ph.D., is Director of Research in the Faculty of Business, Economics and Law at the University of Queensland in Australia, and Professor of Management in the UQ Business School. His current research interests are in emotions at work, leadership, organizational culture, and business ethics.

    Claire Ashton-James is a visiting scholar at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of New South Wales. Her current research interests include mood and non-conscious cognitive and interpersonal processes.

    Bruce J. Avolio, Ph.D. is the Clifton Chair in Leadership in the College of Business Administration, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. His current research interest is authentic leadership development.

    Thomas W. Britt, Ph.D. is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Clemson University. His research interests include determinants and consequences of self engagement at work and other locations, the stigma of psychological problems in the workplace, and organizational stress and motivation as predictors of well-being and performance.

    Robyn L. Brouer is a Ph.D. candidate in Management at Florida State University. She has research interests in the areas of the leadership, social effectiveness, multiple dimensions of person-environment fit, work stress, and social influence processes, including impression management and politics.

    Michael E. Brown, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Management in the Sam and Irene Black School of Business at Penn State-Erie. His research interests are positive approaches to leadership with a focus on ethical leadership.

    Kim S. Cameron, Ph.D., is Professor of Management and Organization in the Ross School of Business and Professor of Higher Education in the School of Education at the University of Michigan. His current research focuses on the virtuousness of and in organizations and their relationships to organizational success.

    Cary L. Cooper, CBE, is Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health and Pro Vice Chancellor of the University of Lancaster, UK. His current research interests are in the fields of workplace stress/eustress, work-life balance and the personal/coping factors that create healthy individuals and organizations.

    James M. (Jim) Dickinson is the Strategic Initiatives Coordinator for the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers and part-time Director of Planning and Research for the Marion I. & Henry J. Knott Foundation. His current interests include successful reentry of ex-offenders and collaborations among philanthropic organizations.

    Gerald R. Ferris, Ph.D., is the Francis Eppes Professor of Management and Professor of Psychology at Florida State University. He has research interests in the areas of social influence and effectiveness processes in organizations, and the role of reputation in organizations.

    Janaki Gooty is a Ph.D. candidate in Organizational Behavior in the Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University. Her primary research interests are in the areas of leadership, emotion and trust.

    Tiffany M. Greene-Shortridge, M.S., is an I-O doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology at Clemson University. Her current research interests include the stigma of admitting psychological problems, determinants and consequences of positive organizational behavior, the influence of individual differences on person-environment fit, organizational health, and work-family issues.

    Charlice Hurst is a Ph.D. student in Management at the University of Florida. Her interests include the relationships among personality, workplace social interaction, diversity, and job attitudes and behaviors.

    Timothy A. Judge, Ph.D., is the Matherly-McKethan Eminent Scholar of Management at the University of Florida. His research interests are in the areas of personality, mood and emotions, job attitudes, staffing, careers, and leadership.

    Laura M. Little is a Ph.D. candidate in Organizational Behavior in the Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University. Her primary research interests include the areas of affect and emotional labor.

    Fred Luthans, Ph.D., is Distinguished University Professor at the University of Nebraska and a senior scientist with Gallup. His current research interests include positive organizational behavior, the development and performance impact of psychological capital, and global mindset.

    Marilyn Macik-Frey is the E.F. Faust/Goolsby Doctoral Fellow at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her research interests are in leadership and communication competence, occupational health and positive organizational behavior.

    Eric S. McKibben, BA, is a graduate student in the Department of Psychology at Clemson University. His research interests include determinants and consequences of self engagement at work, aspects of emotional labor, and positive psychological states at work.

    Debra L. Nelson, Ph.D., is Spears School of Business Associates' Professor of Management at Oklahoma State University. Her current research interests are positive organizational behavior, emotions at work, and occupational health.

    Pamela L. Perrewé, Ph.D., is the Distinguished Research Professor and Jim Moran Professor of Management in the College of Business at Florida State University. Dr. Perrewé's current research interests are in job stress, coping, organizational politics, emotion and personality.

    James Campbell (Jim) Quick, Ph.D., is John and Judy Goolsby Distinguished Professor at The University of Texas at Arlington and Visiting Professor, Lancaster University Management School, UK. His current research interests are leadership development, emotional competence, and executive coaching.

    Arie Shirom, Ph.D., is Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Graduate Program of Organizational Behavior of the Faculty of Management, Tel-Aviv University. His current research interests include the effects of vigor on physical health, the impact of work-related stress and burnout on employees' health, and stress and performance.

    Bret L. Simmons, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Management in the College of Business Administration at The University of Nevada, Reno. His research currently focuses on eustress, hope, positive psychology and employee health and performance.

    Gretchen M. Spreitzer, Ph.D., is Professor of Management and Organizations at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on employee empowerment and leadership development, particularly during times of change.

    Jason S. Stoner is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Management at Florida State University. His primary research interests are identification, stress and coping, and the interactive influence of dispositional and situational factors on workplace behaviors.

    Kathleen M. Sutcliffe, Ph.D., is professor of Management & Organizations at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. Her current research interests include team and organizational learning and resilience, high-reliability organizing, and the social and organizational underpinnings of medical mishaps.

    Linda Klebe Treviño, Ph.D., is Professor of Organizational Behavior, Cook Fellow in Business Ethics, and Director of the Shoemaker Program in Business Ethics in the Smeal College of Business at The Pennsylvania State University. Her recent research focuses on managing for ethical conduct in organizations.

    Thomas A. Wright, Ph.D., is a Professor of Organizational Behavior at the University of Nevada, Reno. His current research interests include: optimizing employee performance, sustaining employee commitment, enhancing employee health and well-being, and business ethics.

    Carolyn M. Youssef, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Management at Bellevue University. Her current research interests include positive organizational behavior and psychological capital.


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