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Jackie Orr

In: Pathology and the Postmodern: Mental Illness as Discourse and Experience

Chapter 3: Performing Methods: History, Hysteria, and the New Science of Psychiatry

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Performing Methods: History, Hysteria, and the New Science of Psychiatry
Performing methods: History, hysteria, and the new science of psychiatry
JackieOrr

The ways in which she struggles in the trap, the disjointed sentences in which she has begun to think herself through from where she is, the tentative experiments with a direction – these come themselves to be described as ‘symptoms’. Lacking adequate formulation, they can have no direction, no outcome, no progressive movement. They abort at the outset. They become merely ‘expressive’, merely a motion or a gesture, a raving, a hysteria, an attack on the dark in the dark.…

(Smith, 1975: 6)

‘I’ is not an interior affair.

(Acker, 1993: 211)

‘I’ begin with three scenes and a bad dream. A few stories set circulating within a theoretical moment ...

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