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In: Organizational Justice and Human Resource Management

Chapter 4: Organizational Justice and Staffing Decisions: On the Horns of a Justice Dilemma?

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Organizational Justice and Staffing Decisions: On the Horns of a Justice Dilemma?
Organizational justice and staffing decisions: On the horns of a justice dilemma?

Historically, organizations have approached staffing from what could be called a “prediction paradigm” (de Wolff, 1993). Under this approach, the human resource practitioner (e.g., an industrial/organizational [I/O] psychologist or a personnel officer) is primarily responsible for administering a valid test. Validity, of course, is seen as the extent to which a test correlates with some relevant criterion, usually job performance. As Arvey (1992) noted, a test is often considered fair if it more or less accurately predicts performance and does not differentially predict the performance of protected subgroups, such as women, minorities, and the disabled. “Fairness,” therefore, reduces to “statistical fairness,” and ...

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