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Theodore F. Cohen

In: Men's Friendships

Chapter 6: Men's Families, Men's Friends: A Structural Analysis of Constraints on Men's Social Ties

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Men's Families, Men's Friends: A Structural Analysis of Constraints on Men's Social Ties
Men's families, men's friends: A structural analysis of constraints on men's social ties
TheodoreF.Cohen
Introduction

There are some rather familiar sketches of men's experiences of friendship and intimacy. Men are often described as lacking both an appreciation of and capabilities for intimacy (Bell, 1981; Rubin, 1983, 1985; Stein, 1986). Men are inexpressive, rational, and competitive. In such sketches, men are consistently described as being uncomfortable with or incapable of expressing and confiding intimate thoughts and feelings (Balswick.& Peek, 1971;McGill, 1985; Rubin, 1976,1983,1985). This is especially characteristic of, though not restricted to, the portrait of men's relationships with other men (Bell, 1981; Levinson, 1978; McGill, 1985; Stein, 1986). In such social relationships, men are described as ...

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