• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

This book looks at religion in a transnational and global context and presents a systematic account of the methods undertaken by modern day missionaries to convert people.

The author seeks to understand the outworking of the American phenomenon of televangelism in India, in a new historical, cultural, religious, political and economic setting. He likens global televangelism to ‘McDonaldization’, because of its standardized, ‘one size fits all’ approach. ‘Glocal’ televangelism—the fusion of the American and Indian evangelism—is referred to as ‘Masala McGospel’ because of the overwhelming presence of the global, American grammar and logic in the presentation and style of these programs in India. The author then goes on to show how a disjunction is being created in Hindu televangelism because of such blending of American techniques ...

Hindu Televangelism: The Economics of Orthopraxy
Hindu televangelism: The economics of orthopraxy

In 1912, the film The Life of Christ premiered in Bombay. Dhundiraj Govind Phalke watched this movie and was seized by an urge to produce movies that depicted Hindu mythologies. He left for England to study cinematography and upon his return, on 3 May 1913, he released the Hindu mythological film Raja Harishchandra, India's first full-length, indigenous, silent film. This was to be followed by many Hindu mythologicals on film produced by Phalke, which later earned him the title: The father of Indian cinematography (George, 1989).

This is yet another instance of the interesting interplay between Christianity and Hinduism. In Chapter 1, I made the assertion that Hinduism influenced the Charismatic movement. In this chapter, ...

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