Journalism: A Critical History

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Martin Conboy

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    Dedication

    Lara Mathilda

    Für-niemand-und-nichts-Stehen.

    Unerkannt,

    für dich

    allein.

    (Paul Celan)

    Acknowledgements

    This book is the product of a great deal of collective effort which has unselfishly and often, I suspect, unknowingly guided my reading and writing or even, quite simply, created the space necessary. Whether I have made best use of all of this assistance is the task of the reader to judge. It has been a privilege in the course of writing to be able to take the time to involve myself in the study of many specialist texts which deal with the historical aspects of journalism. These include original manuscripts, microfilm and a wide range of published work, both contemporary and out of print. I have been absorbed by the depth and range of material which there is to explore. I hope in return that I have been able to produce not just a synopsis but rather a synthesis which will enable students of journalism to develop an understanding of its historical complexity and wealth. Many cohorts of students both at Potsdam University and the Surrey Institute of Art and Design University College have played their part in contributing their enthusiasms to the long gestation of this work in their listening, questioning and participation, confirming that there can be a genuine link between research and teaching in the interests of students and the wider academic community.

    As a great deal of the research for this book has taken place in libraries, I must thank the many librarians who have assisted by their support and by their meticulous attention to a variety of requests. The librarians at Colindale Newspaper Library and the British Library have been efficient and enormously co-operative. From among all the smiling faces at the library in Farnham, I must single out Gwynneth Wilkey and Lorraine Langdon who have provided a level of expertise which would be the envy of any library in the world.

    A special debt of gratitude is reserved for Jim Beaman, Jane Taylor, Bob Turner and Martin Pover without whose support, in different ways, in the most trying of circumstances, this project could never have been completed. They may not be as aware as they should be of the impact they have had in enabling this book to reach the publication stage. They illustrate not only the truth of Hazlitt's comment that ‘honesty is militant’ but in addition that it always emerges, in institutional terms, from below. Jane Taylor, in particular, has provided inspirational leadership in ways which indicate that there is no incompatibility between managerial excellence and academic integrity, a rare feat these days and one for which she deserves more credit. The sleuth-eyed Delwyn Swingewood has earned a special thanks. The Surrey Institute of Art and Design University College Research Fund has provided support for travel, archival materials and indexing.

    Thanks are also due to Jamilah Ahmed and Julia Hall at Sage whose shared enthusiasm has moved the book from concept to production and who continue to engage creatively in the emergence of this area of the British intellectual environment.

    Finally, to Simone for displaying her characteristically unflinching and unconditional optimism towards this particular project and life in general. Vorwärts, und nicht vergessen…!

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