Previous Chapter Chapter 11: An Overview of Current Research and Best Practices for Training Beginning Group Leaders Next Chapter

By: Rex Stockton, Keith Morran & Seok-Hwan Chang

In: Handbook of Group Counseling & Psychotherapy

Chapter 11: An Overview of Current Research and Best Practices for Training Beginning Group Leaders

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

An Overview of Current Research and Best Practices for Training Beginning Group Leaders
An overview of current research and best practices for training beginning group leaders
Rex StocktonKeith MorranSeok-Hwan Chang

The origin of formal group counseling and psychotherapy is often traced to 1905 when Joseph Pratt, a physician, utilized a group or “class” format to assist patients with tuberculosis (Gazda, Ginter, & Horne, 2001). Throughout the remainder of the 20th century, groups emerged as an increasingly popular mode of intervention in psychotherapy and counseling settings. Today, group methods are popular across a wide variety of settings to assist clients who present with a diverse range of goals and concerns (Corey, 2012). Thus, training models need to provide for this diversity. Group counseling is generally considered to ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website