Group Work with Sexually Abused Children: A Practitioner's Guide

Books

Lynn Grotsky, Carel Camerer & Lynn Damiano

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Chapters
  • Front Matter
  • Back Matter
  • Copyright

    View Copyright Page

    Preface

    We believe it is important for you, the reader, to understand our theoretical framework. This framework is based on our philosophy, which has formed how we work with sexually abused children and their families and is the foundation for the goals and objectives of our groups. The suppositions we are working under are as follows:

    • Child abuse exists.
    • It is atypical for young children to lie about being sexually abused. In fact, children are more apt to omit rather than commit information to avoid negative consequences.
    • In order to treat the symptoms of sexual abuse, the therapist must treat the whole person: the intellectual, emotional, physical, sexual, and spiritual selves.
    • The entire family is affected when a member is sexually abused. Therefore, the entire family needs and deserves treatment.
    • There are no effective quick, short-term treatments for victims of ongoing sexual abuse, and a combination of modalities is needed for treatment to be effective.
    • Society is in various stages of denial about sexual abuse. Society is limited to the discovery and assertion of only that which it sanctions.
    • Abuse is perpetuated by a society that encourages people to be competitive, judgmental, and controlling and where one or more groups of people are considered to be inferior to another. Victims need to be educated about society's imbalance of power to minimize future victimization.
    • Sexual abuse is a socially communicable disease that, if left untreated, is passed from one generation to the next.
    Acknowledgments

    This book, like many good things in life, is the result of a team effort. There are many people we have learned from and been inspired by, and who have greatly influenced us. The first of these, of course, are the incredible children and their families with whom we have worked over the years. To them we extend our gratitude and dedicate this book. May your wounds be transformed into wisdom and the causes of your pain into compassion.

    A special thanks to all the staff and interns at the Center for Individual and Family Counseling who challenged us, developed many of the exercises in this book, and had and continue to have a major influence on our work with children. Our heartfelt thanks to the following staff members: Patricia Godleman, Karen Farber, Gabrielle Clayton, Dawn Larsen, Sandra Hurd, Katy Murray, and Jody Ferguson. We deeply appreciate and admire your creativity, passionate dedication to your work, and impeccable clinical skills. A specific thank-you to the following interns: Margaret Vest, Kendall Wark, Susan Kravit, Sara Vanucci, Mike Holly, Linda Lunow, Christine Auvil, Jesalyn Greenwald, Heather Brown, Elizabeth Marcus, Beth Rogers, and Marsha Zaritsky. Your questioning and wonderment kept us on our toes and forced us to articulate how and why we use the techniques we do. Thank you to Karen McQuivey, Lucy Berliner, Faye Adams, Bev Emery, Melissa Allen, Jill Cooper, St. Peter Hospital's Sexual Assault Clinic, the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs, and the Office of Crime Victim Advocates for your wonderful ideas, help, or grants, which assisted us in providing the therapy. For their great editing abilities, we wish to thank Jon Conte (for sticking with us through so many years!), Georgene Marshman, Wayne Kritzberg, Lisa Brodoff, Jolie Sandoz, Katy Lusson, and Lucy Bayer. And John Konovsky and Don Martin, thank you for opening up your home and computer to us.

    A joyous thank you and appreciation to our cover illustrators, 6-year-old Jesse and 9-year-old Micha Brodoff. Micha drew the loving hands with stamped hearts while Jesse drew children attending group. Jesse, as your mother says, “you are a blessing to her and now a blessing to others who have been hurt like you. You are so strong!” Thank you, Jesse and Micha.

    Most of all, we would like to thank one another for writing this book together. It is said that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Melding three different writing and clinical styles (not to mention egos) is a major challenge and accomplishment. This book is an absolute combination of all three of our voices, beliefs, and styles. Over the years we have worked, taught, learned, laughed, and cried together. The book is much stronger because of this, and so are we.

    LynnGrotsky, CarelCamerer, and LynnDamiano

    I am forever indebted to and in constant awe of Lisa Brodoff, my life partner and soul mate, whose unflinching support, humor, and dedication to me and our children has allowed me to have the courage, confidence, and time to complete this book. In addition, I thank all my friends, my family, my children, Evan and Micha, and the Righteous Mothers, who have always been and continue to be there for me. After two decades of working with sexually abused children and their families, your friendship and support continue to humor, cajole, and cradle me, supplying me with the energy, vision, and compassion to continue with this work.

    L.G.

    I am ever so grateful to Lynn Damiano, my life partner and twin flame, whose light and commitment is an encouragement each day of this journey. Thank you for sharing your kind, gentle spirit and the brilliance of your wisdom. Songs, laughter, and love flow through you like water, soothing me and all the souls you touch. Thank you to my family for believing in me and encouraging me to complete this book, which at times was a daunting task. Old friends and new have offered such gracious support and thoughtful consideration throughout this project. Thank you to my dearest friends for five-element acupuncture and big feelings.

    C.C.

    It isn't everyday that the opportunity arises to profess private gratitudes publicly. I am thankful for the chance. To Carel Camerer, my life partner, best friend, and coauthor of all meaningful things, thank you for being you and loving me. No words are deep enough to express how your presence, love, and courage encourage me and everyone in your path. To my family, thank you for loving me through the hard and silent times and sharing in the good that came from them. To my friends, especially Shannon Osborne, Peggy Zorn, and Cathay Webb, thank you for your loving support, wisdom, and patience, and for listening even when your ears were threatening suicide.

    L.D.
  • Appendix: Sample Group Outlines

    Preschool Support Group (8 Weeks, 60-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Ball Toss” to learn each others' names and other general information (use a teddy bear for a ball)

    “Safety Rules”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    “My Own Safe Place”

    A story about safety or building friendships and snack

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Ball Toss” to relearn names and say one thing you like about yourself

    Review safety rules

    “Group Mascot”

    “London Bridge”

    Draw a picture of yourself big and strong

    Story about feeling good about yourself and snack

    Week 3

    Goals: Self-esteem and boundaries (identifying feelings)

    “Ball Toss” using questions about general feelings

    “Animal Boundaries”

    “If You're Angry and You Know It” (using all feelings)

    Draw pictures of feelings you feel sometimes (happy, mad, sad, confused)

    Story about feelings and snack

    Week 4

    Goals: Boundaries (feelings about the abuse); dynamics of abuse

    “Ball Toss” with questions about feelings about the abuse

    “Revised Cookie Jar Tune”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum” with feelings about the abuse

    “Magic Tricks”

    Draw a picture of your feelings about being touched

    Story about being tricked and snack

    Week 5

    Goals: Triggers; dynamics of abuse

    “Ball Toss” with an explanation of triggers first; then each give an example of a positive and a negative trigger unrelated to abuse

    Read 101 Dalmatians (a short version)

    Draw a picture of a safe place

    “Revised Cookie Jar Tune”

    Week 6

    Goal: Boundaries (regarding feelings about the offender)

    “Ball Toss” with questions about triggers they have and ways they can center themselves

    “Clay Faces”

    “Boundary Line”

    “London Bridge”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 7

    Goals: Self-protection; healthy body image

    “Ball Toss” about parts of your body you like

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    “Safety Plan”

    Story about self-protection or body image and snack

    Week 8

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony”

    “Friendship Medals” while eating and partying

    Preschool Therapy Group (8 Weeks, 60-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Ball Toss” to learn each others' names and other general information (use a teddy bear for a ball)

    “Safety Rules”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    “My Own Safe Place”

    A story about safety or building friendships and snack

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Ball Toss” to relearn names and say one thing you like about yourself Review safety rules

    “Group Mascot”

    “London Bridge”

    Story about feeling good about yourself and snack

    Week 3

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries (identifying feelings)

    “Ball Toss” using questions about general feelings

    “Animal Boundaries”

    “If You're Angry and You Know It” (using all feelings)

    Draw pictures of feelings you feel sometimes (happy, mad, sad, confused)

    Story about feelings and snack

    Week 4

    Goals: Boundaries (feelings about the abuse); dynamics of abuse

    “Ball Toss” with questions about feelings about the abuse

    “Revised Cookie Jar Tune”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum” with feelings about the abuse

    “Magic Tricks”

    “The Trick Hat”

    Story about being tricked and snack

    Week 5

    Goals: Triggers; dynamics of abuse

    “Ball Toss” with an explanation of triggers first, then each give an example of a positive and a negative trigger unrelated to abuse

    Read 101 Dalmatians (a short version); discuss how the puppies might be triggered later in life (eat a snack during the story)

    “Drawing Where Molested”

    “Centering”

    “Revised Cookie Jar Tune”

    Week 6

    Goals: Boundaries (regarding feelings about the offender)

    “Ball Toss” with questions about triggers they have and ways they can center themselves

    “Clay Faces”

    “Boundary Line”

    “Talking to the Offender Psychodrama”

    Eat a snack

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 7

    Goals: Self-protection; healthy body image

    “Ball Toss” about parts of your body you like

    “Prevention Skits”

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    “Safety Plan”

    Story about self-protection or body image and snack

    Week 8

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony”

    “Friendship Medals” while eating and partying

    Boys' Support Group (8 Weeks, 90-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Imaginary Object” to learn each others' names and other general information

    “Safety Rules” (while eating snack)

    “Group Mascot”

    “My Own Safe Place”

    Tag (if you have enough room) or Red Light/Green Light

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Ball Toss” to relearn names and say one thing you like about yourself

    Quick review of safety rules

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    Draw a picture of yourself big and strong (snack while drawing)

    Discussion of the power of our thoughts (positive thoughts help us feel and be stronger)

    Fun closing game, such as Telephone, Freeze Tag, or Duck, Duck, Goose

    Week 3

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries (identifying feelings)

    “Ball Toss” using general questions about identifying feelings

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum” with questions about feelings

    “Sentence Completion” (with snack during the discussion)

    “If You're Angry and You Know It” (using all feelings)

    Draw pictures of feelings you feel sometimes (happy, mad, sad, confused)

    Closing exercise such as passing a hand squeeze around the circle

    Week 4

    Goal: Boundaries (with a focus on anger)

    “Ball Toss” with questions about different feelings they had during the week

    “Target of the Offender”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum” with feelings about situations when they might feel angry and ways they sometimes express that anger

    “Clay Faces” (and snack)

    “If You're Angry and You Know It” (focusing just on anger)

    Closing exercise—a fun game

    Week 5

    Goals: Internal boundaries; dynamics of abuse

    “Ball Toss” with questions regarding feelings about the abuse

    “Revised Cookie Jar Tune”

    “Magic Tricks”

    Write a list of three ways you were tricked by your abuser.

    Using paper taped to the wall, draw a line to represent how tall the abuser was and a line showing how tall the child was. Discuss how difficult it is to stand up to someone larger than you. Do this for each child. (Serve snack during this time)

    Quick discussion of why people abuse others (Include an explanation that they have a touching problem and are drawn to children. Explain that this has nothing to do with homosexuality.)

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 6

    Goals: External boundaries; triggers

    “Ball Toss” with questions about how their abusers tricked them

    “Life Vest”

    “Feelings/Thoughts Mask” (with snack)

    “Centering”

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    Week 7

    Goal: Self-protection

    “Ball Toss” with questions about a time this week they used their vest and one thing they like about another person in group

    “Preventions Skit”

    “Safety Plan” (with snack)

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    Week 8

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony” and party

    Boys' Therapy Group (8 Weeks, 90-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Imaginary Object” to learn each others' names and other general information

    “Safety Rules” (while eating snack)

    “Group Mascot”

    Tag (if you have enough room) or Red Light/Green Light

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Ball Toss” to relearn names and say one thing you like about yourself

    Quick review of safety rules

    “Group Mascot”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    “My Own Safe Place” (snack during the exercise)

    Fun closing game, such as Telephone, Freeze Tag, or Duck, Duck, Goose

    Week 3

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries (identifying feelings)

    “Ball Toss” using general questions about identifying feelings

    “Group Collage”

    “Sentence Completion” (with snack during the discussion)

    “If You're Angry and You Know It” (using all feelings)

    Closing exercise such as passing a hand squeeze around the circle

    Week 4

    Goal: Boundaries (with a focus on anger)

    “Ball Toss” with questions about different feelings they had during the week

    “Target of the Offender”

    “Sentence Completion” (in front of a video camera)

    “If You're Angry and You Know It” (focusing just on anger)

    Snack

    Closing exercise—a fun game

    Week 5

    Goals: Internal boundaries; dynamics of abuse

    “Ball Toss” with questions regarding feelings about the abuse

    “Revised Cookie Jar Tune”

    “Magic Tricks” (one or two tricks)

    “The Trick Hat”

    Using paper taped to the wall, draw a line to represent how tall the abuser was and a line showing how tall the child was. Do this for each child. (Serve snack during this time.)

    Quick discussion on why people abuse others (Include an explanation that they have a touching problem and are drawn to children. Explain that this has nothing to do with homosexuality.)

    Begin “My Own BASK Book”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 6

    Goals: External boundaries; triggers

    “Ball Toss” with questions about how their abusers tricked them

    Begin “My Own BASK Book” (while eating snack)

    “Boundary Line”

    “Centering”

    Week 7

    Goal: Self-protection

    “Ball Toss” with questions about a time this week they used their personal space and one thing they like about another person in group

    Finish “My Own BASK Book”

    “Prevention Skits”

    “Safety Plan” (with snack)

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    Week 8

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony” and party

    Girls' Support Group (14 Weeks, 90-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Imaginary Object” to learn each others' names and other general information

    “Safety Rules”

    “Group Mascot”

    “Sharing Our Stories”

    If there is time, Tag (if you have enough room) or Red Light/Green Light

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; Self-esteem

    “Ball Toss” to relearn names and say one thing you like about yourself

    Quick review of safety rules

    “Group Collage About the Abuse”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    Week 3

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries (identifying feelings)

    “Check-In” (What thoughts or feelings did you have this week regarding the abuse?)

    “Sharing Our Stories” (beginning part: Who touched you? How old were you? Are you safe now?)

    Draw a picture of yourself big and strong

    Closing exercise such as passing a hand squeeze around the circle

    Week 4

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share one great thing and one rotten thing that happened this week.)

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    “Feelings/Thoughts Mask”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Group hug or hand squeeze

    Week 5

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share one time in the past week you showed an inside feeling to someone on the outside.)

    “Friendship Medals”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Red Light/Green Light or Tag

    Week 6

    Goals: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Has being sexually abused changed you in any way? If so, how has it changed you?)

    “Boundary Line”

    “Life Vest”

    Drawing of yourself wearing the life vest

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 7

    Goals: Boundaries; dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Share a time this week that you used your life vest.)

    “Familiar Feelings”

    “Sentence Completion”

    “Letter From Angie”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 8

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Is there anyone you trust? If yes, what about that person helps you to trust him or her?)

    “The Butterfly and the Spider”

    “Personal Butterfly”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Hot Potato with a ball (if time permits)

    Week 9

    Goals: Triggers; self-esteem

    “Check-In” (Name three things you like about yourself.)

    “101 Dalmatians”

    “Centering”

    “Target of the Offender”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 10

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share a trigger you had this past week.)

    “The Alligator River Story”

    “Letter/Video to the Offender”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 11

    Goal: Healthy body image

    “Check-In” (Share one thing you like about your body.)

    “Body Rights and Responsibilities”

    “Body Tracing”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 12

    Goals: Self-protection; healthy body image

    “Check-In” (Name some ways you felt you used your body this week that felt good.)

    Stretches (each person takes a turn leading the group in a body stretch)

    “Healing Image”

    “My Safety and Comforts”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    Week 13

    Goal: Self-protection

    “Check-In” (Share one time you stood up for yourself or protected yourself this week.)

    Roleplay what to do if: (1) you notice a fire; (2) a car pulls up and a driver asks you for directions; (3) you're home alone and someone comes to the door; and (4) your uncle wants you to hug him but you don't because you feel a little bit icky inside.

    Draw a picture of yourself healthy and strong

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 14

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony” and party

    Girls' Therapy Group (15 Weeks, 90-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Imaginary Object” to learn each others' names and other general information

    “Safety Rules”

    “Group Mascot”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (first set of questions)

    If there is time, Tag (if you have enough room) or Red Light/Green Light

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Ball Toss” to relearn names and say one thing you like about yourself

    Quick review of safety rules

    “Group Collage About the Abuse”

    “Yes/No/Maybe Continuum”

    Week 3

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries (identifying feelings)

    “Check-In” (What thoughts or feelings did you have this week regarding the abuse?)

    “Sharing Our Stories” (second set of questions)

    “Me, Through the Years”

    Closing exercise such as passing a hand squeeze around the circle

    Week 4

    Goals: Self-esteem; boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share one great thing and one rotten thing that happened this week.)

    “Internal/External Self”

    “Life Vest”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Group hug or hand squeeze

    Week 5

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share one time in the past week that you used your life vest.)

    “Sentence Completion”

    Begin “My Own BASK Book”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    “Simon Says and I Say”

    Week 6

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Has being sexually abused changed you in any way? If so, how has it changed you?)

    “Why People Sexually Abuse Kids”

    Continue “My Own BASK Book”

    “The Trick Hat”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 7

    Goal: Dynamic of abuse

    “Check-In” (Do you think you could have stopped the sexual assault? If yes, how?)

    “Letter From Angie”

    “Sexual Assault Continuum”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (third set of questions)

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 8

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Is there anyone you trust? If yes, what about that person helps you to trust him or her?)

    Word association

    “The Butterfly and the Spider”

    “Personal Butterfly”

    If there is time, “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 9

    Goals: Dynamics of abuse; boundaries (regarding feelings about the offender)

    “Check-In” (What are some of your feelings toward the abuser?)

    “My Own Safe Place”

    “Talking to the Offender Psychodrama”

    “Letter/Video to the Offender”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 10

    Goal: Triggers

    “Check-In” (Share one way your offender tricked or manipulated you.)

    “Elizabeth's Triggers”

    “Drawing Where Molested”

    “Centering”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 11

    Goal: Triggers

    “Check-In” (Share a time this week that you were triggered. What happened?)

    “Triggered Memories”

    “How We Sabotage Ourselves”

    “Centering”

    Group cheer

    Week 12

    Goals: Self-protection; healthy body image

    “Check-In” (Share one thing you like about your body.)

    “Body Rights and Responsibilities”

    “Boundary Line”

    “My Safety and Comforts”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 13

    Goal: Self-protection

    “Check-In” (Share one time you stood up for yourself or protected yourself this week.)

    “Prevention Skits”

    “Healing Image”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 14

    Goals: Self-protection; dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (What do you need to feel safer in your life now?)

    “Letter/Video to Nonoffending Parent(s)”

    “Safety Plan”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 15

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony”

    “Friendship Medals” while eating and partying

    Teen Support Group (Ages 11+) (15 Weeks, 90-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Check-In” (How are you feeling about being here and what do you hope to get out of the group?)

    Self collage

    “Safety Rules”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Check-In” (What was the most outrageous thing you did this week?)

    Quick review of safety rules

    “Group Mascot”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (first set of questions)

    Hot Potato with a ball

    Week 3

    Goal: Self-esteem

    “Check-In” (Name three things you like about yourself.)

    “Group Collage About the Abuse”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (second set of questions)

    Closing exercise such as passing a hand squeeze around the circle

    Week 4

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share one great thing and one rotten thing that happened this week.)

    “Feelings/Thoughts Mask”

    “Life Vest”

    Group hug or hand squeeze

    Week 5

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Share one time in the past week that you used your life vest.)

    “Letter From Angie”

    “Sexual Assault Continuum”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (third set of questions)

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 6

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Has being sexually abused changed you in any way? If so, how has it changed you?)

    “The Alligator River Story”

    “Clay Faces”

    Week 7

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Do you think you could have stopped the sexual assault? If yes, how?)

    Checklist in “Why People Sexually Abuse Kids”

    “Boundary Line”

    “Lean On Me”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 8

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Is there anyone you trust? If yes, what about that person helps you to trust him or her?)

    “The Butterfly and the Spider”

    “Personal Butterfly”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 9

    Goals: Dynamics of abuse; boundaries (regarding feelings about the offender)

    “Check-In” (What are some of your feelings toward the abuser?)

    “My Own Safe Place”

    Sentence Completion

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 10

    Goal: Triggers

    “Check-In” (Share one way your offender tricked or manipulated you.)

    “Letter/Video to the Offender”

    “Centering”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 11

    Goal: Triggers

    “Check-In” (Share a time this week that you were triggered. What happened?)

    “How We Sabotage Ourselves”

    “Centering”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Group cheer

    Week 12

    Goals: Self-protection; healthy body image

    “Check-In” (Share one thing you like about your body.)

    “Body Rights and Responsibilities”

    “My Safety and Comforts”

    “Healing Image”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 13

    Goal: Self-protection

    “Check-In” (Share one time you stood up for yourself or protected yourself this week.)

    “Date Rape”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 14

    Goals: Self-protection; dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (What do you need to feel safer in your life now?)

    “Body Tracing”

    “Safety Plan”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 15

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony”

    “Friendship Medals” while eating and partying

    Teen Therapy Group (Ages 11+) (15 Weeks, 90-Minute Sessions)

    Week 1

    Goal: Safety and trust

    “Check-In” (How are you feeling about being here and what do you hope to get out of the group?)

    Self collage

    “Safety Rules”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 2

    Goals: Safety and trust; self-esteem

    “Check-In” (What was the most outrageous thing you did this week?)

    Quick review of safety rules

    “Group Mascot”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (first set of questions)

    Hot Potato with a ball

    Week 3

    Goal: Self-esteem

    “Check-In” (Name three things you like about yourself.)

    “Group Collage About the Abuse”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (second set of questions)

    Closing exercise such as passing a hand squeeze around the circle

    Week 4

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Share one great thing and one rotten thing that happened this week.)

    “Internal/External Self”

    “Life Vest”

    Group hug or hand squeeze

    Week 5

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Share one time in the past week that you used your life vest.)

    “Letter From Angie”

    “Sexual Assault Continuum”

    Begin “My Own BASK Book” (if there is time)

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 6

    Goal: Boundaries

    “Check-In” (Has being sexually abused changed you in any way? If so, how has it changed you?)

    “The Alligator River Story”

    Continue “My Own BASK Book”

    Week 7

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Do you think you could have stopped the sexual assault? If yes, how?)

    “Boundary Line”

    Continue “My Own BASK Book”

    “Sharing Our Stories” (third set of questions)

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 8

    Goal: Dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (Is there anyone you trust? If yes, what about that person helps you to trust him or her?)

    “Why People Sexually Abuse Kids”

    “The Butterfly and the Spider”

    “Personal Butterfly”

    If there is time, “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 9

    Goals: Dynamics of abuse; boundaries (regarding feelings about the offender)

    “Check-In” (What are some of your feelings toward the abuser?)

    “My Own Safe Place”

    “Talking to the Offender Psychodrama”

    “Let It All Out/Sound Train”

    Week 10

    Goal: Triggers

    “Check-In” (Share one way your offender tricked or manipulated you.)

    “Letter/Video to the Offender”

    “Elizabeth's Triggers”

    “Centering”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 11

    Goal: Triggers

    “Check-In” (Share a time this week that you were triggered. What happened?)

    “Drawing Where Molested”

    “Triggered Memories”

    “Centering”

    Group cheer

    Week 12

    Goals: Self-protection; healthy body image

    “Check-In” (Share one thing you like about your body.)

    “Body Rights and Responsibilities”

    “My Safety and Comforts”

    “Healing Image”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 13

    Goal: Self-protection

    “Check-In” (Share one time you stood up for yourself or protected yourself this week.)

    “Date Rape”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 14

    Goals: Self-protection; dynamics of abuse

    “Check-In” (What do you need to feel safer in your life now?)

    “Letter/Video to Nonoffending Parent(s)”

    “Safety Plan”

    “Questions and Answers Box”

    Week 15

    Goal: Closure

    “Debriefing and Evaluating Group”

    “Completion of Group Ceremony”

    “Friendship Medals” while eating and partying

    References

    Alexander, P. C. (1993). The differential effects of abuse characteristics and attachment in the prediction of long-term effects of sexual abuse. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 8, 346–362. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/088626093008003004
    Brauns, B. G. (1993). The BASK model of dissociation. Paper presented at the Outcome-Oriented Treatments of Choice Conference, “Psychotherapy Under Managed Care,” San Francisco.
    Browne, A., & Finkelhor, D. (1986). Impact of child sexual abuse: A review of the research. Psychological Bulletin, 99, 66–77. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.99.1.66
    Carozza, P. M., & Heirsteiner, C. L. (1982). A group art therapy model. Clinical Social Work Journal, 10, 165–175. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00756001
    Celano, M. P. (1990). Activities and games for group psychotherapy with sexually abused children. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 40, 419–429.
    Conte, J., Briere, J., & Sexton, D. (1989, August). Mediators of long-term symptomatology in women molested as children. Paper presented at the 97th Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans.
    Davis, N. (1990). Once upon a time: Therapeutic stories to heal abused children. Oxon Hill, MD: Psychological Association of Oxon Hill.
    Deblinger, E., Hathaway, C. R., Lippman, J., & Steer, R. (1993). Psychological characteristics and correlates of symptom distress in nonoffending mothers of sexually abused children. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 8, 155–168. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/088626093008002001
    Deblinger, E., & Heflin, A. (1996). Treating sexually abused children and their nonoffending parents: A cognitive behavioral approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    Everson, M. D., Hunter, W. M., Runyon, D. K., Edelson, G. A., & Coulter, M. L. (1989). Maternal support following disclosure of incest. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 59, 197–207. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-0025.1989.tb01651.x
    Fluegelman, A. (1976). The new games book. Garden City, NY: Dolphin.
    Friedrich, W., Berliner, L., Urquiza, A., & Beilke, R. (1988). Brief diagnostic group treatment of sexually abused boys. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 3, 331–343. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/088626088003003007
    Furniss, T. (1987). An integrated treatment approach to child sexual abuse in the family. Children and Society, 2, 123–135.
    Gomes-Schwartz, B., Horowitz, J. M., & Cardarelli, A. P. (1990). Child sexual abuse: The initial effects. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
    Horney, K. (1991). Neurosis and human growth: The struggle toward self-realization (
    40th ed
    .). New York: W. W. Norton.
    Kelley, S. J. (1990). Parental stress response to sexual abuse and ritualistic abuse of children in day care centers. Nursing Research, 39, 25–29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00006199-199001000-00006
    Leberg, E. (1997). Understanding child molesters: Taking charge. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    Linehan, M. M. (1993). Cognitive-behavioral treatment of borderline personality disorder. New York: Guilford.
    Mandell, J., & Damon, L. (1989). Group treatment for sexually abused children. New York: Guilford.
    McCarthy, B. W. (1990). Treatment of incest families: A cognitive-behavioral model. Journal of Sex Education and Therapy, 16, 101–114.
    Ribordy, S. C. (1989). Treating intrafamilial sexual abuse from a systemic perspective. Journal of Psychotherapy and the Family, 6, 71–82. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J287v06n03_05
    Rossman, M. (1987). Healing yourself: A step-by-step program for better health through imagery. New York: Pocket Books.
    Saunders, B. E., Villeponteaux, L. A., Lipovsky, J. A., Kilpatrick, D. G., & Veronen, L. J. (1992). Child sexual assault as a risk factor for mental disorders among women: A community survey. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 7, 189–204. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/088626092007002005
    Sgroi, S. M., & Dana, N. T. (1982). Individual and group treatment of mothers of incest victims. In S. M.Sgroi (Ed.), Handbook of clinical interventions in child sexual abuse (pp. 191–214). Lexington, MA: Lexington.
    Way, I. F., & Spieker, S. D. (1997). The cycle of offense: A framework for treating adolescent sexual offenders. Notre Dame, IN: Jalice.
    Zaidi, L., & Gutierrez-Kovner, V. (1995). Group treatment of sexually abused latency-age girls. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 10, 215–227. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260595010002006

    About the Authors

    Lynn Grotsky, MSW, CSW, began working with traumatized and abused children in 1979. Through the years, she has combined her background in hospice, play therapy, feminist theory, trauma work, and child development in forming her theories and practice for her work with children. She strongly believes in the importance of advocating for children, and therefore serves on numerous committees and works on policy and legislative changes to benefit children and their families. She is also a trainer and consultant as well as a presenter at conferences throughout Washington State and the nation on such subjects as group work with sexually abused children, the dynamics of sexual abuse, sibling incest, and the mental health professional as expert and fact witness in court. With the staff at the Center for Individual and Family Counseling, she developed the SAFTE (Sexual Abuse Family Treatment and Education) Program, an intensive 6- to 9-month treatment program for all nonoffending family members, including siblings and extended family, that provided individual, group, and family treatment. She is currently in private practice and works with the Providence/St. Peter Hospital Sexual Assault Clinic in Olympia, Washington, developing and organizing sexual abuse therapy groups and supervising graduate-level interns. She also loves parenting her son and daughter and managing the singing group the Righteous Mothers—four funny, philosophical folk-rock musicians.

    Carel Camerer, MA, LMT, has a background as an educator and trainer and has worked with children and families since 1980. She began therapeutic intervention work with abused, traumatized children and nonoffending adults in 1983. She cofounded the Center for Individual and Family Counseling and has led interstate as well as national trainings and workshops on identification and treatment of child sexual assault as well as group therapy as treatment for child sexual abuse. With a passion for the complexity and diversity found throughout all of nature and humankind, she weaves together the principles of two congenial therapeutic partners: Oriental medicine and psychology. Her extensive studies of Jin Shin Jyutsu and Chinese Five-Element Theory dramatically affect her unique treatment style and mind-body work. In her current private practice, she treats sexually abused children and adult survivors as well as individuals with stress management issues, anxiety disorder, psychosomatic and autoimmune disease. She also teaches “Wellness Wise” classes to the staff at Providence/St. Peter Hospital and Jin Shin Jyutsu classes privately in the community. Her practice has grown to include women and couples with fertility and adoption issues, adoptive children, and preadolescent girls coming of age. Her integrated method of practice helps people heal at the subtle level of spirit, which positively influences mental, emotional, and physical health.

    Lynn Damiano, MA, is a state-certified psychotherapist in private practice in Olympia, Washington, and adjunct Associate Professor at St. Martin's College in the Master's of Psychology Program. She began working with chemically dependent adolescents and their families in 1984 and developed one of the first adolescent chemical dependency intensive outpatient programs in the state. During that time, she pioneered efforts to bring early identification and assessment practices into county high schools and middle schools. This early experience laid a foundation for the later cocreative development of the SAFTE (Sexual Abuse Family Treatment and Education) Program at the Center for Individual and Family Counseling, where she became a partner and co-owner in 1988. The current focus of her practice includes group work with women survivors of sexual abuse. Her “Adult Daughters of Not So Functional Families” group has been offered twice a year since 1989 as a powerfully transformative complement to individual therapy. She also treats couples in traditional and alternative marriages and partnerships who are experiencing difficulty or growing pains. She regularly presents workshops, consultation, and supervision groups on a unique assessment and treatment method she developed over years of practice and study called Intra Psychic Mapping (© 1994). This method combines object relations, developmental, and dialectic theories into a powerful and practical tool for exploring behavior and motivation, understanding defensive patterns, and creating change at the core level of personality.

    We would love to hear from you!

    Do you have any feedback for us on exercises in this book that you have tried?

    We may be doing a sequel to this book, so we are also interested to know if you have additional exercises that you have found to be especially effective. If you do, please describe them for us. If we use them in the next book, we want to be sure to give you credit, so remember to include your name.

    Please send responses to

    Lynn Grotsky

    2419 Carpenter Road

    Lacey, WA 98503

    e-mail: rtmom@aol.com

    Or if you have questions and interest in the application of mind/body work for the treatment of psychosomatic symptoms of sexual abuse, curiosity about how to adapt our exercises to adult survivor groups, or have specific questions regarding the treatment of 3–6 year olds, please send inquiries and thoughts to:

    Carel Camerer

    2222 A State Ave NE

    Olympia, WA 98506

    e-mail: MtnMammas@aol.com

    And if you like to wax pyschological about sexual abuse theory or related issues such as treatment protocols for sexual abuse and chemical dependency (in primary or secondary victims), or “family dynamics associated with sibling abuse” and “blaming the victim,” or would like information about “Intrapsychic Mapping” as a tool for assessing and treating sexual abuse and family patterns, please send us your questions, musings, and experience to:

    Lynn Damiano

    2222 A State Ave NE Suite A

    Olympia, WA 98506

    e-mail: MtnMammas@aol.com

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website