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Tim May & Jason Powell

In: Cultural Theory: Classical and Contemporary Positions

Chapter Seven: Foucault: Interpretive Analytics and the Constitution of the Social

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Foucault: Interpretive Analytics and the Constitution of the Social
Foucault: Interpretive analytics and the constitution of the social
TimMayJasonPowell
Introduction

My objective has been to create a history of the different modes by which, in our culture, human beings are made subjects.

(Foucault, 1983: 208)

Michel Foucault's work covered an enormous range of topics and has been influential across a variety of disciplines. At the same time it can be puzzling for those wishing to understand its implications for analysing cultural relations. Foucault was a ‘masked philosopher’ who deliberately sought to avoid being aligned with any particular school of thought: ‘It is true that I prefer not to identify myself, and that I'm amused by the diversity of the ways I've been judged and classified’ (1997: 113).

Despite this preference, writers ...

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