Creatively Teach the Common Core Literacy Standards With Technology: Grades 6-12

Books

Catlin R. Tucker

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  • Copyright

    Acknowledgements

    This book is dedicated to all of the teachers who take risks, embrace failure, and aggressively pursue their own learning.

    To my husband, Darian. I adore you. Thank you for supporting my ambitions, tolerating my Starbucks habit and doing all of the laundry! You’re the reason I can write a book while teaching and being a mom to our children, Cheyenne and Maddox.

    Finally, to my Grandpa Ken who at 88 is one of my biggest fans and my sounding board. This book is exponentially better because of you.

    List of Live Links

    Visit http://bit.ly/CreativelyTeachwithTech (please note that this URL is case sensitive) to access live links used throughout the book.

    Note From the Publisher

    This website provides access to resources and websites that are not maintained, sponsored, endorsed, or controlled by Corwin. Your use of these third-party websites will be subject to the terms and conditions posted on such websites. Corwin takes no responsibility and assumes no liability for your use of any third-party website. Corwin does not approve, sponsor, endorse, verify, or certify information available any third-party resource or website.

    Chapter 2. Transforming Low-Tech Classrooms With BYOD and Mobile Devices
    Chapter 3. The Reading Standards
    Chapter 4. Argumentative Writing
    Chapter 5. Informative Writing
    Chapter 6. Narrative Writing
    Chapter 7. Rethinking Research
    Chapter 9. Speaking and Listening
    Chapter 10. Charging Ahead in the Face of Change

    Preface

    Why Is This Book Essential at This Particular Time in Education?

    Educators today are facing two major shifts—transitioning to the Common Core Standards and increasing pressure to teach students with the technology they’ll be expected to use in their lives beyond high school. Both seasoned educators and those new to the teaching profession must confront these daunting challenges, which demand fundamental changes in the way teachers teach and students learn.

    In my own budget-strapped district, the conversations about the Common Core Standards rarely include mention of technology. I believe this is a missed opportunity. Technology is woven throughout the fabric of the Standards, just as it is increasingly woven throughout the fabric of our lives. This is no mistake. Students today must be capable and proficient users of technology to pursue a degree or apply for a job after high school. In fact, most college applications and job applications are completed online now.

    The Standards attempt to honor these new realities, but districts must support teachers with dedicated, ongoing professional development. Educators must learn how to integrate technology into their teaching practice to cultivate the skills necessary for success in college and careers. Technology cannot be a frill or an afterthought. It must be integrated thoughtfully and with purpose. Unfortunately, many teachers do not get to decide how district money is spent and what the focus of their professional development days will be. My hope is that this book will be useful to educators who want to further their own understanding of both the Standards and technology integration. I’ve included lesson ideas, technology suggestions, and concrete strategies for creatively teaching the Common Core Literacy Standards with technology.

    Most of the conversations about technology on my campus are focused on the hardware needed for the Smarter Balance Assessment. Teachers in other states may be hearing about PARCC, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers—the alternate assessment aligned to the Common Core Standards. The irony is that the assessments are designed to test student achievement in relation to the new Standards, but how can students be successful on these exams, both of which are computerized assessments, if they are not regularly using technology in their classes? Instead, I want the conversation to focus on how educators can use the latest Web 2.0 technology to engage higher-order thinking, foster collaboration, develop communication skills, encourage exploration through research, and drive dynamic problem solving. That is the goal of this book.

    In my own work outside of the classroom as a professional development facilitator and blogger, I’ve realized teachers are hungry for concrete information on both the Common Core Standards and technology integration. Many teachers have told me how grateful they are that I combine practical strategies for using technology with a discussion of the Common Core Standards in my trainings and blog posts. Their positive feedback and request for more information led me to write this second book.

    Although this book is focused on how teachers can use technology to teach the Common Core Standards, I want to be clear that I do not believe technology alone will transform education. Excited, creative, eager-to-learn educators leveraging the newest tools available to actively engage students in learning will change education and blaze the path toward preparing our students for success in a rapidly changing global economy.

    What Will You Get Out of This Book?

    Most teachers are treading water to stay on top of their massive workloads, but the new Standards require change. As a teacher myself, I know how valuable it is to have resources and strategies that I can use with students today. The most valuable professional development is immediately applicable to my work with students. I’ve written this book with that in mind. The ideas in this book are not based on theory or pedagogy alone. They are grounded in my own trial-and-error experience over the last 5 years, working to integrate technology in a meaningful way with my own students.

    This book will

    • provide teachers with a clear explanation of the Common Core Literacy Standards;
    • identify key points of emphasis in the Standards;
    • highlight tech tools that can be used to effectively cultivate the skills identified as necessary to success beyond high school;
    • embed ideas for using technology to differentiate learning, provide scaffolding, and support students at different skill levels; and
    • share concrete strategies and lesson ideas that leverage Web 2.0 technology to encourage students to be active and engaged participants in the learning process.

    In addition to being a practical book for teachers, I hope this text supports the work professional development instructors, instructional designers, curriculum and IT specialists, administrators, and credential programs are doing to help support middle school and high school teachers in effectively shifting to the Common Core Literacy Standards using technology.

    Although the aim of this book is to provide simple, easy-to-understand explanations about the Standards and creative ideas for using technology to improve learning, my focus as an educator is always to create a student-centered classroom. The theme of the student-centered classroom is an undercurrent throughout this text. I believe powerful learning begins when we put students at the center of the learning process, so my approach values autonomy, choice, collective construction, and creativity.

    Acknowledgments

    I want to thank my students. You are the reason this book exists. You challenge me to be a better educator. You have been my teachers as much as I have been yours. Each day I learn something valuable from working with each of you. Thank you for your willingness to take risks and engage with one another. I’m amazed by all you have accomplished and feel so fortunate to have been your teacher.

    Thank you to my students Casey Perez and Cambria Souza who volunteered their time and talents to contribute photographs and artwork to this book.

    I want to acknowledge the unwavering support of my Grandpa Ken Fermoyle, who was the second set of eyes on this book. He read every chapter and provided priceless feedback on this book as it began to take shape. In my moments of doubt, he was there to encourage and guide me. I love you and am so grateful to have had you in my corner while writing this book.

    Publisher’s Acknowledgments

    Corwin gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the following reviewers:

    • Abigail Frost
    • 7th Grade Reading and Writing Teacher
    • Boston Collegiate Charter School
    • Dorchester, MA
    • Danielle Hartman
    • Literacy and Technology Integration Specialist
    • Burlington County Institute of Technology
    • Westhampton, NJ
    • Chris Hubbuch
    • Principal
    • Excelsior Springs Middle School
    • Excelsior Springs, MO
    • Alice Keeler
    • Adjunct Professor
    • California State University, Fresno
    • Fresno, CA
    • Tina Kuchinski
    • English Teacher and Department Chair
    • Gresham High School
    • Gresham, OR
    • Jan McClaren
    • Teacher, Department Head
    • Claremore High School
    • Claremore, OK
    • Michael S. Mills
    • Assistant Professor, Teaching & Learning
    • University of Central Arkansas
    • Conway, AR
    • Ernie Rambo
    • U.S. History Teacher
    • Walter Johnson Jr. High School
    • Las Vegas, NV
    • Michael Stein
    • English Teacher
    • Coffee County Central High School
    • Manchester, TN

    About the Author

    Catlin R. Tucker is an accomplished Google Certified Teacher, CUE Lead Learner, professional development facilitator and trainer, education consultant, speaker, and author. She teaches 9th and 10th grade English language arts at Windsor High School in Sonoma County, where she was named Teacher of the Year in 2010. She has also taught online college level writing courses, which led to her interest in blended learning and technology integration. Corwin published her first book Blended Learning for Grades 4–12 in June 2012, and she authored a blended learning course for ASCD. She coauthored a book titled Creating a Google Apps Classroom, which was published in June 2014. In addition, Catlin has published articles in Educational Leadership, OnCue, and the Teacher Librarian Journal. Catlin earned her bachelor’s degree in English from UCLA and her English credential and master’s degree in education from UCSB. She writes an internationally ranked education technology blog at CatlinTucker.com and is active on Twitter @Catlin_Tucker.

  • Appendix Tools and Strategies for Developing Skills Identified in the Common Core Anchor Standards

    Common Core Anchor Standard

    Tool or Strategy

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.1

    Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

    Audio Recording (for capturing a “think aloud”)

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    Expert Group Investigations

    Grammar Challenges

    Grammarly (for editing writing)

    NoRedInk (for grammar review)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.2

    Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

    Grammar Challenges

    Grammarly (for editing writing)

    NoRedInk (for grammar review)

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.4

    Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.

    Flipped Vocabulary Lesson

    Google Documents (Define tool)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.5

    Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Flipped Vocabulary Lesson

    Lights, Camera, Action

    Visual Vocabulary

    Word Sneak

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.6

    Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.

    Digital Flash Cards

    Flipped Vocabulary Lesson

    Lights, Camera, Action

    Visual Vocabulary

    Word Sneak

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1

    Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

    Diigo

    Expert Group Investigations

    Google Docs (for collaboratively annotating)

    Newsela

    Padlet

    Smithsonian Tween Tribune

    StudySync

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.2

    Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

    Diigo

    Google Docs (for collaboratively annotating)

    Newsela

    Smithsonian Tween Tribune

    StudySync

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.3

    Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

    Diigo

    Google Docs (for collaboratively annotating)

    StudySync

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.4

    Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

    Google Docs (for collaboratively annotating)

    Newsela

    Smithsonian Tween Tribune

    StudySync

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.7

    Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

    Expert Group Investigations

    Student-Designed Infographics

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.10

    Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

    Diigo

    Google Docs (for collaboratively annotating)

    Newsela

    Smithsonian Tween Tribune

    StudySync

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.1

    Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    Creating Digital Stories

    Crowdsourcing

    Expert Group Investigations

    Four-Corner Conversations

    Grammar Challenges

    KQED “Do Now” (for global Twitter chats)

    Recording, Watching, and Critiquing Conversations

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    Voxer

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.2

    Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

    Creating Digital Stories

    Expert Group Investigations

    Four-Corner Conversations

    Grammar Challenges

    Student-Designed Infographics

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.3

    Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

    Four-Corner Conversations

    Recording, Watching, and Critiquing Conversations

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.4

    Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

    Expert Group Investigations

    Four-Corner Conversations

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.5

    Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

    Creating Digital Stories

    Expert Group Investigations

    Student-Designed Infographics

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.6

    Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

    Capturing Ideas With Mobile Devices

    Four-Corner Conversations

    Recording, Watching, and Critiquing Conversations

    Voxer

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.1

    Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

    Argumentative Writing Templates

    Debate.org

    Evernote (for organizing and saving online resources)

    Google Docs (for pro vs. con chart)

    KQED “Do Now”

    Schoology (online debates)

    TED Talks (for information on controversial topics)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.2

    Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

    Audio Recording (for capturing a “think aloud”)

    Digital Notebook

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Google Docs (informative writing template)

    Google Drawing

    Cause and Effect Brainstorm

    Description Mind Map

    Multimedia Timeline

    Problem and Solutions Brainstorm

    Venn Diagram

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.3

    Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

    Creating Digital Stories

    Google Forms and Sheets (for practicing using transitional language in narrative writing)

    Google Maps (for inspiring narrative writing)

    Google Story Builder

    Instagram (for a sensory walk)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.4

    Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

    Creating Digital Stories

    Digital Notebook

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    StudySync (for writing in response to the reading)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.5

    Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

    Audio Recording (for capturing a “think aloud”)

    Creating Digital Stories

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Grammarly (for editing writing)

    StudySync (for anonymous peer editing)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.6

    Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

    Creating Digital Stories

    Digital Notebook

    Evernote

    Expert Group Investigations

    Google Docs (for collaboratively annotating)

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Google Forms and Sheets (for practicing using transitional language in narrative writing)

    Google Maps (for inspiring narrative writing)

    Google Story Builder

    Instagram (for a sensory walk)

    KQED “Do Now” (for global Twitter chats)

    Padlet

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    StudySync (for writing and peer editing)

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.7

    Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

    A Google a Day

    Crowdsourcing

    Digital Notebook

    Expert Group Investigations

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Student-Designed Infographics

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.8

    Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

    A Google a Day

    Crowdsourcing

    Expert Group Investigations

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Student-Designed Infographics

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9

    Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

    Expert Group Investigations

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Newsela

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    Smithsonian Tween Tribune

    Student-Designed Infographics

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.10

    Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    Audio Recording (for capturing a “think aloud”)

    Google Docs (for writing a digital research paper)

    Schoology (for asynchronous online discussions)

    StudySync

    KQED “Do Now” (for global Twitter chats)

    Source: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers. (2010a). Common Core State Standards for English language arts and literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_ELA%20Standards.pdf; National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers. (2015). Common Core Anchor Standards for speaking and listening. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/SL/

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