Previous Chapter Chapter 8: Acutely Ill Children and Their Families: Implications for Research, Practice, and Education Next Chapter

Marion E. Broome

In: Children and Families in Health and Illness

Chapter 8: Acutely Ill Children and Their Families: Implications for Research, Practice, and Education

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Acutely Ill Children and Their Families: Implications for Research, Practice, and Education
Acutely ill children and their families: Implications for research, practice, and education
Marion E.Broome

The experience of acute or critical illness and hospitalization has long been acknowledged to be a significant event for children and their families (Thompson, 1985; Vernon, Foley, Sipowicz, & Schulman, 1965). Although institutional practices related to family-centered care have made significant progress this past decade (Johnson, Jeppson, & Redburn, 1992), children and their families are still exposed to multiple stressors during an acute/critical illness. These stressors include separation from friends and family, financial concerns, painful procedures and treatments, uncertainty about their prognosis, and interruption of daily routines that lend structure and predictability to a child's life. Hospitals and other acute care ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website