• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

What progress have African Americans made in corporate America? This book examines the evidence by drawing on studies of almost 200 black corporate managers and their families. A past president of the New York State Council on Family Relations, author Susan D. Toliver, shows that black families have progressed in corporate America, but the inroads are uneven. Toliver takes a penetrating look at how the cultural identity of black families has been influenced by their participation in corporate America. She also suggests that corporations deepen their commitment to cultural diversity, not in name onlyùbut work to emphasize the talents and develop the strengths of the African American community. Black Families in Corporate America explores the following areas: + Shifting gender dynamics within the families of ...

Child Rearing: Black Middle-Class Issues and Concerns
Child rearing: Black middle-class issues and concerns

My mother said we couldn't invite you.

—White classmate of 7-year-old black corporate youngster

Not many paused to think that the cost of social assimilation might be a loss of identity.

—Morgan, 1985, p. 96

In their struggle for equal rights, blacks in the 1950s and 1960s aimed for equal access to education and employment opportunities, and an end to segregation in housing and public accommodations. To a great extent they have achieved these aims, but with this has come a host of new problems for their children. Although the nature of race relations in many ways has changed, the need to adapt to the conditions of racism persists as a survival tactic. As legal discrimination ...

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