Achieving Success with Your Leadership Project

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David Middlewood & Ian Abbott

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  • Education at SAGE

    SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets.

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    • accessible and comprehensive texts for aspiring education professionals and practitioners looking to further their careers through continuing professional development
    • inspirational advice and guidance for the classroom
    • authoritative state of the art reference from the leading authors in the field

    Find out more at: http://www.sagepub.co.uk/education

    Copyright

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    About the Authors

    David Middlewood is a part-time Research Fellow at The University of Warwick, UK, having previously worked for the Universities of Leicester and Lincoln. At Leicester he was Deputy Director of the Centre for Educational Leadership and Management, and Director of school-based Masters Level programmes. He had a successful career in schools before entering Higher Education (HE), including nine years as headteacher of a secondary school.

    David has taught and researched in various countries and been a visiting professor in New Zealand and South Africa. He has published over a dozen books, including several on Human Resource Management (HRM) topics (with Tony Bush) and ones on practitioner research, strategic management, curriculum management, creating a learning school and on extended schools. He was series editor for Sage's ‘Leadership for Social Justice’ series and was co-editor of two practitioner journals in the UK from 1999 to 2006. His research projects have included ones on support staff, programmes for new leaders, successful leadership teams, leadership and diversity in Further Education, and inclusiveness in schools. He also supports student research as a researcher in residence at a group of Leading Edge schools.

    Ian Abbott is an associate professor at the University of Warwick, UK. He was formerly the deputy director of the Institute of Education at the university. He has led a number of programmes there including the MA in Educational Studies and the MA in Business and Enterprise and he has been Director of Teacher Education. He is currently the national co-ordinator at Warwick for the Teach First programme and he is Director of External Relations for the Institute of Education. Prior to joining the university he had a successful career in schools and colleges, including being Head of a Business Studies Department in a secondary school.

    Ian has taught in a number of countries and has been involved in a wide range of major research projects. He has been editor of the journal of the Economics and Business Education Association. He has published a large number of journal articles and books, including a number on Teacher Education. His research projects have included ones on the establishment and development of leadership teams, creative governance in Further Education and school funding.

    David and Ian have worked, taught and tutored together in the UK and other countries on various leadership and management programmes at Masters Level.

    Preface

    The origins of this book lie in a number of informal conversations between the authors, especially during breaks between teaching sessions in a country where the temperatures and the humidity are consistently high. We found ourselves constantly aware of the large number of students studying at Masters Level in Leadership and/or Management–and a certain number of tutors also–who had expressed concern that there was no single text to which reference might be made for practical, straightforward information and guidance about their work, especially their final projects or dissertations. Further, more systematic enquiries later confirmed this need, and the general idea for such a text developed into this book.

    One of the reasons for writing a book such as this is that the majority of the students concerned are part-time, fitting their study into the hours outside their main work as full-time professional practitioners. This leaves these teachers, lecturers, nurses, social workers, accountants, administrative staff, housing officers, retail management trainees and others with too little time to consult some of the detailed texts which the professional researcher is able to access. We have made reference to a number of such texts, especially in our ‘Further Reading’ at the end of chapters, and those readers who are drawn into the complexities of more advanced data analysis or methodological approaches, for example, should refer to such texts to supplement our guidance here. Many students are ‘sponsored’ by employers for part or all of their work, but many are completely self-funding and in all cases are under great pressures of time to successfully complete the programme and the final project report. Sometimes, career advancement can depend on such success.

    The book is intended for those studying at Masters Level in an area with a component of leadership or management involved, in such areas as education, business studies or social studies. With the need for Masters Level qualifications increasing all the time (for example, at Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)), we believe the book will provide an invaluable resource for all such people. It is rooted both in our own experience of teaching, tutoring and supporting many students on a range of programmes in various countries, and in the experiences of those students themselves. This is why we have included a number of Case Examples to illustrate from students' actual experiences the realities of work at this level. (No students' or organisations' real names are used in these.) All the examples of pro-formas used in the book are adapted from ones used at the Institute of Education of the University of Warwick, but they are typical of those used at most Higher Education (HE) institutions in the United Kingdom.

    Whether you are aiming to produce a final piece of work which is called a ‘dissertation’ or a ‘project’, the format of the book is intended to be easily accessible to all readers, with chapter introductions, summaries and the stressing of particularly important points. We examine all those issues raised with us by students, namely:

    • What research is and how to decide on your topic
    • Designing the research
    • How to write a literature review
    • How to decide on your methodology and then apply it
    • Particular issues involved in research as a practitioner
    • How to present and analyse your data
    • How to write up the final report
    • Making the most of the support available
    • Understanding how your work is assessed.

    Practical issues such as how to structure your project and how to reference your work are all included because in some cases the difference between success or failure can depend on very small points. We wish to stress, however, that all readers need to ensure they are aware of the precise requirements of the particular HE institution to which they are submitting their work, as regulations do vary and it is impossible for us to include all such variations in one text. Therefore, please make sure you carefully read the guidance that you are provided with by your particular HE institution. Similarly, this book in no way attempts to replace your most valuable support–your tutor. He or she remains one of the keys to your success and we hope the book will be helpful to tutors as well.

    We would like to thank various people for their invaluable support, especially Kanta Chauhan for her excellent skills in making our work into a coherent whole, those at Sage Publications, especially Marianne Lagrange, and Tony Bush for his statistical assistance. Colleagues at the University of Warwick's Institute of Education and Business School have been helpful in giving feedback, and of course all the students past and present we have worked with have contributed considerably to the book's content and structure. Finally, David thanks Jacqui and Ian thanks Deb for their personal support and tolerance in the writing of this book.

    We wish everyone success in achieving their goal in Leadership and Management at Masters Level and hope that this book will help in some measure.

    DavidMiddlewood and IanAbbott, January 2011
  • Glossary of Terms Used

    • BIS Business, Innovation and Skills
    • CRB Criminal Records Bureau
    • DfE Department for Education
    • Ed.D. Doctor of Education
    • FT Full-time
    • GCSE General Certificate of Secondary Education
    • HE Higher Education
    • HOD Head of Department
    • HOY Head of Year
    • HRM Human Resource Management
    • ID Identity
    • IT Information Technology
    • LA Local Authority
    • MA Master of Arts
    • MBA Master of Business Administration
    • M.Phil. Master of Philosophy
    • NCSL National College for School Leadership and Children's Services
    • Ofsted Office for Standards in Education
    • PE Physical Education
    • PGCE Postgraduate Certificate in Education
    • Ph.D. Doctor of Philosophy
    • PT Part-time
    • QAS Quality Assurance Service
    • SBM School Based Management/Site Based Management
    • SIT School Improvement Team
    • SWOT Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats
    • UK United Kingdom

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    Author Index

    • Adelman, C., Jenkins, D. and Kemmis, S. 24
    • Altrichter, H., Feldman, A., Posch, P. and Somekh, B. 85
    • Bailey, S. 151
    • Bassey, M. 20, 25, 26, 53
    • Bell, J. 51, 67
    • Belbin, M. 142
    • Black, T. 119
    • Boud, D. and Falchicov, N. 169
    • Briggs, A. 135
    • Brooks, V. 154
    • Burnes, B. 7 12
    • Bush. T. 75, 76, 143
    • Bush, T. and Middlewood, D. 27, 28, 143
    • Bush, T., Bell, L. and Middlewood, D. 7, 12
    • Bush, T., Qiang, H. and Fang, J. 28, 29
    • Busher, H. 77
    • Caldwell, B. 143
    • Campbell, A. and Groundwater-Smith, S. 95
    • Coghlan, D. and Brannick, T. 100
    • Cohen, L. and Manion, L. 24
    • Coleman, M. and Briggs, A. 65
    • Cortazzi, M. 111
    • Craswell, G. 151
    • Creswell, J. 65
    • Crotty, M. 20
    • Cuban, L. 7
    • De Laine, M. 83
    • Denscombe, M. 17, 106, 119, 141
    • Denzin, N. and Lincoln, Y. 83
    • Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) 42
    • Dimmock, C. 28
    • Easterby-Smith, M., Thorpe, R., and Lowe, A. 22, 74
    • Elliot, J. 94
    • Fogelman, K. 71, 73
    • Flowerdew, J. 140
    • Fowler, F. 50
    • Giddings, L. 64
    • Glatter, R.
    • Gray, D. 30, 104
    • Hammond, J., Keeney, R. and Raiffa, H. 144
    • Herr, K. and Anderson, G. 75
    • Hyland, K. 148
    • James, E., Milenkiewicz, M. and Bucknam, A. 22, 75, 76, 116
    • Jankowicz, A. 17
    • Johnson, D. 20 24, 49
    • Koshy, V. 85
    • Lewis, J. and Ritchie, J. 76
    • Lichtman, M. 26, 78, 112
    • Lincoln, Y. and Guba, E.
    • Medwell, J. 145
    • McNiff, J. and Whitehead, J. 85
    • Menter, I., Elliott, D., Hall, J., Hall, S.,
    • Hulme, M., Lewin, J. and Lowden, K. 85
    • Middlewood, D. 29, 39
    • Middlewood, D., Coleman, M. and Lumby, J. 85, 100
    • Middlewood, D. and Parker, R. 143
    • Morrison, M. 59, 136
    • Nahavandi, A. 7
    • Nisbett, J. and Watt, J. 25
    • Ofsted, 42
    • Partridge, B. and Starfield, S. 140, 148
    • Pell, A. and Fogelman, K. 109
    • Popper, K. 20, 116
    • Potter, S. 133
    • Reason, P. Bradbury, H. 85
    • Ridely, D. 46
    • Rumsey, S. 46
    • Rog, L. 145
    • Sagor, R.
    • Scott, J. 63
    • Somekh, B. 85
    • Southworth, G. 7
    • Theisen, G. and Adams, D. 27, 29
    • Watling, R. 111
    • Wellington, J. 133
    • Williams, G. 58
    • Wragg, E. 53, 54
    • Wray, D. 145
    • Yin, R. 24, 30
    • Yukl, G. 7
    • Zerubavel, E. 135, 183

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