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Speech-Language Pathology

  • By: Charlotte J. Enns
  • In: The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia
  • Edited by: Genie Gertz & Patrick Boudreault
  • Subject:Physical Disabilities, Otorhinolaryngology (Ears, Nose, & Throat)

Speech-language pathology (SLP) is an accredited profession focusing on the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of communication effectiveness, disorders, differences, and delays in children and adults. Speech-language pathologists work with the full range of communication including speech, listening, language, reading, writing, and cognition; however, assessment and treatment of signed languages are typically not part of their formal training and are a recently emerging part of their role. Speech-language pathologists must earn a graduate degree that includes clinical experiences, and then pass a national examination in order to practice. Speech-language pathologists provide services to a wide range of individuals with communication needs, many of whom are not deaf. Speech-language pathologists often work in a variety of settings including schools, hospitals, community and private clinics, personal ...

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