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Diversity: First Nation Peoples of North America

  • By: Damara Goff Paris
  • In: The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia
  • Edited by: Genie Gertz & Patrick Boudreault
  • Subject:Physical Disabilities, Otorhinolaryngology (Ears, Nose, & Throat)

American Indians, Alaska Natives, and First Nations people who are deaf often navigate among Native American, Deaf, and Native American Deaf worlds. While the two cultures are distinct, there are parallels between indigenous populations in North America and the Deaf community. Both cultures have experienced a history of oppression and overcome attempted eradication of their cultures. Native Americans who are deaf are overlooked as a viable culture that blends aspects of both indigenous and Deaf cultural mores.

Cultural Identity of Deaf Natives

Native Americans who are Deaf identify themselves in diverse ways as members of indigenous and Deaf communities, and the importance they place in the order of their identification (i.e., Deaf first or Native American first) is affected by a number of factors. These factors include ...

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