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Deaf Education History: Post-1880 to 1979

  • By: Russell S. Rosen
  • In: The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia
  • Edited by: Genie Gertz & Patrick Boudreault
  • Subject:Physical Disabilities, Otorhinolaryngology (Ears, Nose, & Throat)

Between 1880 and 1980, American Deaf education underwent a period of rapid growth and diversification. New types of schools appeared with new educational ideologies, policies, and practices. Education was not even solely the province of schools. There were several social organizations that also provided education. The configuration of American Deaf educational institutions included residential schools, private oral schools, day schools and classes, denominational schools, colleges and college programs, and evening and adult programs for the deaf. These schools and programs represented a vast array of ideas, policies, and practices. Administrative structures, hiring criteria for administrators and teachers, instructional methods, curricula, and the student body varied considerably across these schools and programs and in turn determined the kinds of students who would be educated. The schools ...

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