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Hybrid Geographies

  • By: David Havlick
  • In: Encyclopedia of Geography
  • Edited by: Barney Warf
  • Subject:General Geography, Earth & Environmental Science

Geography has long been characterized as an integrative field—a hybrid discipline that combines elements of the natural and social sciences. With contributions from the humanities and social theory, more explicit considerations of hybrid geographies have attracted increasing critical attention. This trend represents both a new set of concepts in response to new technologies and conditions as well as a renewed embrace of one of the oldest ideas in geography—that simultaneous inquiry of social and natural elements can provide important insights.

At their most basic, hybrid geographies are places, organisms, or other entities that cannot or should not be readily characterized by any single category. As the term hybrid denotes, these places or things feature elements from multiple origins to the extent that they can only properly ...

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