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IntellIgence Tests

  • By: Stephen Petrina & Paula Rusnak
  • In: Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies
  • Edited by: Craig Kridel
  • Subject:Cultural Studies (general), Curriculum & Content (general), Curriculum Studies

Intelligence testing is the process of measuring cognitive ability using standardized measures and scales. The use of intelligence testing for education purposes, including curriculum differentiation, is controversial. This entry discusses the history and criticisms of intelligence testing, along with the role of intelligence testing in curriculum differentiation.

History

In 1905, Alfred Binet and his medical student, Theodore Simon, developed a diagnostic method for distinguishing abnormal from normal boys in his Sorbonne laboratory and the Perray-Vaucluse asylum. During the late 1910s, Henry Goddard translated the Binet-Simon Scale and administered it to his young Vineland Training School charges and about 2,000 children in local New Jersey schools. Goddard wanted all children to be examined, individual by individual, claiming that 2% of school students were feebleminded or mentally defective. Like ...

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