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Excluded/Marginalized Voices

  • By: Rubén A. Gaztambide-Fernández & Sarah Switzer
  • In: Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies
  • Edited by: Craig Kridel
  • Subject:Cultural Studies (general), Curriculum & Content (general), Curriculum Studies

The concept of excluded/marginalized voices is rooted in Black feminist thought. Emerging during the late 1960s, the concept of voice has played a central role in Black women's writing. Black female academics aimed at creating a powerful voice that linked the historical subjugation of Black women's knowledge to the way in which knowledge has been produced both within and outside of the academy. By establishing a connection between voice, the personal experiences of marginalization, and political resistance, this work contributed to new methodological approaches that challenged traditional sites of knowledge production. These scholars struggled to give voice to the experiences of communities that were traditionally excluded from, marginalized by, and subjugated to official knowledge.

Feminist scholars joined curriculum theorists to probe how and what knowledge ...

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